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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jul 2015
    Posts
    5

    Scamming a 15 year old on Craigslist?

    So I'm 15 and since the minimum age for most jobs is 16, I decided to put a resume on Craigslist. (Please don't lecture me)
    I got a message from a man named Curtis Burgess. He asked me to speak to him via Google Hangouts, so I did. Here's the conversation:


    Curtis Burgess: Hello; How are you doing today
    Me: I'm doing well, how are you?
    Curtis Burgess: fine thank you; I am I am Mr Curtis Burgess ,and you?
    Me: I'm Jenna, nice to meet you.

    Curtis Burgess: you too; I believe you are ready to proceed with the job briefing and interview..You will get to know what the responsibilities entails..
    Me: Okay, please continue.
    Curtis Burgess: Kindly Introduce yourself by indicating your full name, cell#,age,location..Thank you!
    Me:
    Curtis Burgess: Good; The name of the company is ITC INFOTECH!! Limited and i will need to open the company profile so i can copy and provide you our company's detail so you will get to know little about the company.; Next would be the briefing about the Job and the company. I advise you read with care. Just follow the briefing and you can ask questions when i am through. Let me know when you have finished reading and understanding every line. You will be allowed to ask questions later. Is that clear ?
    Me: Crystal clear.
    Curtis Burgess: ITC Infotech, a global IT services company, is a fully-owned subsidiary of ITC Limited, the US$ 8 billion diversified conglomerate. ITC Limited is rated among the ‘World's Most Reputable Companies’ by Forbes magazine and among ‘India's Most Valuable Companies’ by Business Today. The working hours are flexible where you could choose to work from anywhere of your choice (Home/Office). The pay is $26.7 per hour training is $13.4 per hour. Paycheck would be bi weekly via direct deposit or paycheck working 40-45 hours weekly, If you are employed you are going to be working as a full employee and not an independent contractor. MISSION : To Enhance the living standards of the customers through innovative products VISION: We wish to grow at 33% CAGR
    VALUES :

    *) Commitment towards interests of all Stakeholders-customers, employees, Shareholders and community.
    *) We never compromise in our ethics and this is reflected in all our actions
    *) We strive to provide a culture that accepts new ideas, embraces change and rejects bureaucracy and small mindedness.
    The Position Offered Is "Administrative Assistant"


    Then we had a long conversation about the job, the requirements, etc... Everything he said seemed like it was copied & pasted. He listed the requirements, which I said I did not meet but he didn't care, which was weird. I answered a 12 question interview and he hired me, a 15 year old girl who completed bs'd any work experience (I didn't lie, I just made eBay and Fiverr.com seem more glorious than it is), just like that! Fishy...

    He asked for more detailed information about myself , which I provide and now regret a bit. I doubt someone's gonna come to my house an rape/murder me, but I will definitely be receiving some fraudulent checks. (Can I just cover them in sharpie, tear it up, and throw them out? Is that how checks work?)

    Then he listed the programs I need, which lead me to this site through Google:
    Here are the name's of the software you will need to start working with BS 1 Accounting software ,myob business essentials software 2012,For Peach Tree premium 2012 US Patent Single Users Pack, simply accounting 2012,Apple Final Cut Express 3.5 HD Upgrade,Norton Ghost 9.0, Microsoft Office XP 2009 Standard Upgrade,Peachtree Premium Accounting 2009.

    I think there's a group of scammers doing this under the names of different companies.

    I was promised a check to pay for these programs, and I ing hate checks. The only ones I've ever cashed were from Paypal. Today I was also promised a check for $1600 by some other guy. Seems real fishy! I said no to him, even after he insisted. I'm still probably gonna end up with it though.

    I'm beginning to think Craigslist was a terrible idea. Or at least putting up a resume was. I'm desperate, okay?

    Anyway, I'm gonna tell him tomorrow that I did some research and don't want to continue working with him.

    I need some advice though - what do I do with the checks if I receive them? Burn them? How should I end communication with these guys? Should I contact ITC Infotech? What the hell do I do???

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Posts
    2,626

    Re: Scamming a 15 year old on Craigslist?

    Thanks for posting up that information on a scam.

    I think there's a group of scammers doing this under the names of different companies.
    You are correct, there are thousands of scammerss sending out fake checks via Craigslist and other sites.

    I was promised a check to pay for these programs, and I ing hate checks. The only ones I've ever cashed were from Paypal. Today I was also promised a check for $1600 by some other guy. Seems real fishy! I said no to him, even after he insisted. I'm still probably gonna end up with it though.
    Yes, that scammer and a dozen more will probably send you fake checks.

    Anyway, I'm gonna tell him tomorrow that I did some research and don't want to continue working with him.
    Don't bother, it isn't worth your effort. Simply stop emailing him and the others, block their email address and move on with your life.

    I need some advice though - what do I do with the checks if I receive them? Burn them? How should I end communication with these guys? Should I contact ITC Infotech? What the hell do I do???

    Burn or shred the fake checks. In some areas it is illegal to possess fake checks even if you mark them "void" and/or "fake".

    To end communication with those guys, simple stop responding to their emails. As tempting as it is to "tell them off", don't. They are criminals, they know what they are doing is illegal and they don't care. They have your real life information, you have nothing on them. Just ignoring them is best, it leaves them wondering what went wrong, what "tipped you off" and why you won't do what they want. Leaving a scammer confused and upset by you not responding is the best way to leave a scammer.

    The next email will be from another of the scammer's fake names and free email addresses pretending to be the "manager/accountant" and will demand you cash that large fake check sent on a stolen UPS/FedEx billing account number and send most of the "money" via Western Union or moneygram back to the scammer posing as the "computer supplies person" while you "keep" a small portion. When your bank realizes the check is fake and it bounces, you get the real life job of paying back the bank for the bounced check fees and all the bank's money you sent to an overseas criminal.

    Western Union and moneygram do not verify anything on the form the sender fills out, not the name, not the street address, not the country, not even the gender of the receiver, it all means absolutely nothing. The clerk will not bother to check ID and will simply hand off your cash to whomever walks in the door with the MTCN# and question/answer. Neither company will tell the sender who picked up the cash, at what store location or even in what country your money walked out the door. Neither company has any kind of refund policy, money sent is money gone forever.

    When you refuse to send him your cash he will send increasingly nasty and rude emails trying to convince you to go through with his scam. The scammer could also create another fake name and email address like "FBI@ gmail.com", "police_person @hotmail.com" or "investigator @yahoo.com" and send emails telling you the job is legit and you must cash the fake check and send your money to the scammer or you will face legal action. Just ignore, delete and block those email addresses. Although, reading a scammer's attempt at impersonating a law enforcement official can be extremely funny.

    Now that you have responded to a scammer, you are on his 'potential sucker' list, he will try again to separate you from your cash. He will send you more emails from his other free email addresses using another of his fake names with all kinds of stories of great jobs, lottery winnings, millions in the bank and desperate, lonely, sexy singles. He will sell your email address to all his scamming buddies who will also send you dozens of fake emails all with the exact same goal, you sending them your cash via Western Union or moneygram.

    You could post up the email address and the emails themselves that the scammer is using, it will help make your post more googlable for other suspicious potential victims to find when looking for information.

    Do you know how to check the header of a received email? If not, you could google for information. Being able to read the header to determine the geographic location an email originated from will help you weed out the most obvious scams and scammers. Then delete and block that scammer. Don't bother to tell him that you know he is a scammer, it isn't worth your effort. He has one job in life, convincing victims to send him their hard-earned cash.

    Whenever suspicious or just plain curious, google everything, website addresses, names used, companies mentioned, phone numbers given, all email addresses, even partial sentences from the emails as you might be unpleasantly surprised at what you find already posted online. You can also post/ask here and every scam-warner-anti-fraud-busting site you can find before taking a chance and losing money to a scammer.

    6 "Rules to follow" to avoid most fake jobs:

    1) Job asks you to use your personal bank/paypal account and/or open a new one.
    2) Job asks you to print/mail/cash a check or money order.
    3) Job asks you to use Western Union or moneygram in any capacity.
    4) Job asks you to accept packages and re-ship them on to anyone.
    5) Job asks you to pay visas, travel fees via Western Union or moneygram.
    6) Job asks you to sign up for a credit reporting or identity verification site.

    Avoiding all jobs that mention any of the above listed 'red flags' and you will miss nearly all fake jobs. Only scammers ask you to do any of the above. No. Exceptions. Ever. For any reason.

    If you google "fake check cashing job", "fraud Western Union car wrap scam", "checkmule moneygram scam" or something similar you will find hundreds of posts from victims and near-victims of this type of scam.

    Making a scammer's scam googlable on every scam-warner-anti-fraud-busting site you can find is a great way to slow that scammer down when a suspicious potential victim goes looking for information, finds your post containing the name the scammer is using, his email address, phone number and the emails themselves and then that potential victim does not become a scam victim because you took the time "get the word out".

    Wasting a scammer's time legally and safely is called "scambaiting". If you google that word, you will find sites where you can read scambaits, post up the emails and email addresses of scammers, post up a fake website, read up on how to alert a hosting company that they are hosting a fake website, ask questions and learn all about the hobby of scambaiting.

    Since that scammer intended to steal your money, he did not give you his real life information. All you have is one of his fake names, one of his free email addresses, one of his fake stories and one of his paid-for-in-cash cell phone numbers. None of that information is going to help your local law enforcement agency track down that anonymous scammer sitting in a cyber cafe half way around the world from you.
    Found a scam or scammer's email address? Post it at scamwarners.com
    Found a romance scam? Post it at romancescam.com

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jul 2015
    Posts
    5

    Re: Scamming a 15 year old on Craigslist?

    Quote Originally Posted by Meri Widow View Post
    Thanks for posting up that information on a scam.


    You are correct, there are thousands of scammerss sending out fake checks via Craigslist and other sites.


    Yes, that scammer and a dozen more will probably send you fake checks.


    Don't bother, it isn't worth your effort. Simply stop emailing him and the others, block their email address and move on with your life.


    Burn or shred the fake checks. In some areas it is illegal to possess fake checks even if you mark them "void" and/or "fake".

    To end communication with those guys, simple stop responding to their emails. As tempting as it is to "tell them off", don't. They are criminals, they know what they are doing is illegal and they don't care. They have your real life information, you have nothing on them. Just ignoring them is best, it leaves them wondering what went wrong, what "tipped you off" and why you won't do what they want. Leaving a scammer confused and upset by you not responding is the best way to leave a scammer.

    The next email will be from another of the scammer's fake names and free email addresses pretending to be the "manager/accountant" and will demand you cash that large fake check sent on a stolen UPS/FedEx billing account number and send most of the "money" via Western Union or moneygram back to the scammer posing as the "computer supplies person" while you "keep" a small portion. When your bank realizes the check is fake and it bounces, you get the real life job of paying back the bank for the bounced check fees and all the bank's money you sent to an overseas criminal.

    Western Union and moneygram do not verify anything on the form the sender fills out, not the name, not the street address, not the country, not even the gender of the receiver, it all means absolutely nothing. The clerk will not bother to check ID and will simply hand off your cash to whomever walks in the door with the MTCN# and question/answer. Neither company will tell the sender who picked up the cash, at what store location or even in what country your money walked out the door. Neither company has any kind of refund policy, money sent is money gone forever.

    When you refuse to send him your cash he will send increasingly nasty and rude emails trying to convince you to go through with his scam. The scammer could also create another fake name and email address like "FBI@ gmail.com", "police_person @hotmail.com" or "investigator @yahoo.com" and send emails telling you the job is legit and you must cash the fake check and send your money to the scammer or you will face legal action. Just ignore, delete and block those email addresses. Although, reading a scammer's attempt at impersonating a law enforcement official can be extremely funny.

    Now that you have responded to a scammer, you are on his 'potential sucker' list, he will try again to separate you from your cash. He will send you more emails from his other free email addresses using another of his fake names with all kinds of stories of great jobs, lottery winnings, millions in the bank and desperate, lonely, sexy singles. He will sell your email address to all his scamming buddies who will also send you dozens of fake emails all with the exact same goal, you sending them your cash via Western Union or moneygram.

    You could post up the email address and the emails themselves that the scammer is using, it will help make your post more googlable for other suspicious potential victims to find when looking for information.

    Do you know how to check the header of a received email? If not, you could google for information. Being able to read the header to determine the geographic location an email originated from will help you weed out the most obvious scams and scammers. Then delete and block that scammer. Don't bother to tell him that you know he is a scammer, it isn't worth your effort. He has one job in life, convincing victims to send him their hard-earned cash.

    Whenever suspicious or just plain curious, google everything, website addresses, names used, companies mentioned, phone numbers given, all email addresses, even partial sentences from the emails as you might be unpleasantly surprised at what you find already posted online. You can also post/ask here and every scam-warner-anti-fraud-busting site you can find before taking a chance and losing money to a scammer.

    6 "Rules to follow" to avoid most fake jobs:

    1) Job asks you to use your personal bank/paypal account and/or open a new one.
    2) Job asks you to print/mail/cash a check or money order.
    3) Job asks you to use Western Union or moneygram in any capacity.
    4) Job asks you to accept packages and re-ship them on to anyone.
    5) Job asks you to pay visas, travel fees via Western Union or moneygram.
    6) Job asks you to sign up for a credit reporting or identity verification site.

    Avoiding all jobs that mention any of the above listed 'red flags' and you will miss nearly all fake jobs. Only scammers ask you to do any of the above. No. Exceptions. Ever. For any reason.

    If you google "fake check cashing job", "fraud Western Union car wrap scam", "checkmule moneygram scam" or something similar you will find hundreds of posts from victims and near-victims of this type of scam.

    Making a scammer's scam googlable on every scam-warner-anti-fraud-busting site you can find is a great way to slow that scammer down when a suspicious potential victim goes looking for information, finds your post containing the name the scammer is using, his email address, phone number and the emails themselves and then that potential victim does not become a scam victim because you took the time "get the word out".

    Wasting a scammer's time legally and safely is called "scambaiting". If you google that word, you will find sites where you can read scambaits, post up the emails and email addresses of scammers, post up a fake website, read up on how to alert a hosting company that they are hosting a fake website, ask questions and learn all about the hobby of scambaiting.

    Since that scammer intended to steal your money, he did not give you his real life information. All you have is one of his fake names, one of his free email addresses, one of his fake stories and one of his paid-for-in-cash cell phone numbers. None of that information is going to help your local law enforcement agency track down that anonymous scammer sitting in a cyber cafe half way around the world from you.

    Thank you so much. I think I just dodged a bullet on that one. I will definitely keep this in mind in the future. I really appreciate it.

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