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  1. #1
    tommywho70x Guest

    America's Top Black Women

    Shirley Chisholm
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    Shirley Chisholm in 1972Shirley Anita St. Hill Chisholm (November 30, 1924 - January 1, 2005) was an American politician, educator and author. She was a Congresswoman representing New York's 12th District from 1969-1983. In 1968, she became the first African-American woman elected to Congress. In 1972, she became the first African-American and the first woman to make a serious bid to be President of the United States.

    Born in Brooklyn, New York as Shirley St. Hill, she spent part of her childhood in Barbados with her grandmother, benefiting from the British school system. She later attended Brooklyn College and graduated with a Bachelor of Arts degree in 1949. While working as a teacher, Chisholm earned a Master's degree in elementary education from Columbia University. From 1953-1959, she was director of the Hamilton-Madison Child Care Center, and from 1959-1964 was an educational consultant for the Division of Day Care.

    In 1964, Chisholm ran and was elected to the New York State Legislature. She then ran as the Democratic candidate for New York's 12th District congressional seat and was elected to the House of Representatives in 1968. She defeated Republican candidate James Farmer, to become the first African-American woman elected to Congress.

    As a freshman, Chisholm was assigned to the House Forestry Committee. Given her district, she felt the placement was a waste of time and shocked many by demanding reassignment. She was placed on the Veterans' Affairs Committee. Soon after, she voted for Hale Boggs as Majority Leader over John Conyers, even though Boggs was white. As a reward for her support, Boggs assigned her to the much-prized Education and Labor Committee; she was the third-highest ranking member when she retired.

    Chisholm joined the Congressional Black Caucus in 1969 as one of its founding members. In 1972, Chisholm made a bid for the Democratic Party's presidential nomination, and received 152 delegate votes, but ultimately lost the nomination to South Dakota Senator George McGovern. Chisholm's base of support was ethnically diverse and included the National Organization for Women. Among the volunteers who were inspired by her campaign was Barbara Lee, who would go on to become a congresswoman some 25 years later. Chisholm said she ran for the office "in spite of hopeless odds," "to demonstrate the sheer will and refusal to accept the status quo."

    Chisholm created controversy when she visited rival and ideological opposite George Wallace in the hospital soon after his shooting during that campaign. Several years later, when Chisholm worked on a bill to give domestic workers the right to a minimum wage, Wallace got her the votes of enough southern congressmen to push the legislation through the House. Throughout her tenure in Congress, Chisholm would work to improve opportunities for inner-city residents. She was a vocal opponent of the draft and supported spending increases for education, healthcare and other social services, and reductions in military spending. She announced her retirement from Congress in 1982, and was replaced by a fellow Democrat in 1983. After leaving Congress, Chisholm was named to the Purington Chair at Mount Holyoke College in South Hadley, Massachusetts, where she taught for four years. She was also very popular on the lecture circuit.

    Chisholm was married to Conrad Chisholm from 1949-1977. Upon their divorce, she married Arthur Hardwick, Jr., who died in 1986.

    Shirley Chisholm was a member of Delta Sigma Theta Sorority, Incorporated. In 1993, she was inducted into the National Women's Hall of Fame. Chisholm also authored two books, Unbought and Unbossed (1970) and The Good Fight (1973).

    Chisholm retired to Florida and passed away on January 1, 2005. In February 2005, Shirley Chisholm '72: Unbought and Unbossed, a documentary film chronicling Chisholm's 1972 bid for the Democratic presidential nomination, was aired on U.S. public television. Directed and produced by independent, black woman filmmaker Shola Lynch, the film was featured at the Sundance Film Festival in 2004.

    [edit]
    External link
    Chisholm speech on the Equal Rights Amendment
    Retrieved from "http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Shirley_Chisholm"
    Categories: 1924 births | 2005 deaths | African American politicians | New York politicians | American professors | American academics

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  2. #2
    tommywho70x Guest

    Re: America's Top Black Women

    Even after her death...

    The Ella Fitzgerald Charitable Foundation, working with the University of Virginia health care system, has made the lead gift to establish diabetes care for refugees from Hurricane Katrina

    09-22-2005

    The University of Virginia will be establishing a mobile medical clinic, and they estimate that 30-40% of the refugees will suffer from Diabetes and its complications. In memory of Miss Fitzgerald and her lifetime efforts to help others, the Foundation has made the first monetary gift to help UVA purchase and transport needed supplies and medications. If you would like to help, please contact the Foundation or Dr. Jerry Nadler at www.virginia.edu.

    http://www.ellafitzgerald.com/viewheadline.php?id=3418

  3. #3
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    Re: America's Top Black Women

    Tommy....aren't you gonna add Oprah to the list?....LOL :D

  4. #4
    tommywho70x Guest

    Re: America's Top Black Women

    The Turiya Alice Coltrane Page
    Born Alice MacLeod, Alice Coltrane married John Coltrane in 1965. One of the rare female instrumentalists in jazz, she was also (along with Dorothy Ashby) one of the few harpists in jazz. She performed in the early 1960s with vibist Terry Gibbs, appearing on one of his recordings. Eventually she replaced McCoy Tyner as the Coltrane group's pianist in 1966.

    John Coltrane's work became a spiritual wellspring for her, but she surely developed her own style on piano, organ, harp, and later, Indian instruments such as the tamboura. After John Coltrane's death Alice began recording under her own name, like John for Impulse! records. She collaborated numerous times with Pharoah Sanders and Carlos Santana.

    Her own recordings started out as small group settings, but eventually added elaborate Stravinsky-esque string orchestrations. She also helped coordinate a number of posthumously released John Coltrane recordings in the early 1970s, especially "Infinity" with its psychedelic kaleidoscope album cover. She recorded her own version of his "A Love Supreme" complete with invocation from her Hindu guru. In the later 1970s her music became highly infused with Hindu religious music, whole sides of her albums being devoted to arrangements of religious chants.

    She was a devotee of Swami Satchidananda, and eventually adopted the Hindu name of Turiya. In 1975 she formed the Vedanta Center in California as a center for her spiritual activities. In her spiritual life she is now a devotee of living Hindu saint Satya Sai Baba, and goes by the name Swamini Turiyasangitananda. In the 1980s and 1990s she made a number of recordings of devotional music that are not very widely distributed, but are now listed herein.

    She was for a long while the executor of John Coltrane's estate, though her own recording career seems to have ended in the late 1970s. She moved from the Impulse! label to Warner Brothers in the mid-1970s. Eventually control over John Coltrane's still extant recordings passed to her son--himself a wonderful saxophonist--Ravi Coltrane. In 1998 she emerged from jazz retirement to play two New York City concert dates. Follow this link for a review.

    Her recent spiritual, devotional recordings outside of a jazz context (as well as many of her writings) are distributed by the Avatar Book Institute, PO Box 1503, Agoura Hills, CA 91376-1503.

    Follow this link for an Alice Coltrane Select Discography



    --------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    Back to Ian's Guide To The Ecstatic Spirit In Jazz.
    Updates, corrections, and friendly comments may be mailed to [email protected].



    http://members.aol.com/ishorst/love/alice.html

  5. #5
    tommywho70x Guest

    Re: America's Top Black Women

    Mahalia Jackson
    From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia.
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    Mahalia JacksonMahalia Jackson (October 26, 1911–January 13, 1972) was an African American gospel singer, widely regarded as one of the best in the history of the genre. She grew up in the "Black Pearl" section of the Carrollton neighborhood of uptown New Orleans, Louisiana and began singing in a Baptist church. She moved to Chicago, Illinois in 1927 where she sang with The Johnson Brothers, one of the earliest professional gospel groups.

    The Johnson Brothers broke up in the mid 1930s, and Jackson began her solo career, recording for Decca in 1937. The result, God's Gonna Separate the Wheat from the Tares was only a moderate success, but Jackson became a popular concert draw. She experienced a recording hiatus until 1946 when she signed with Apollo Records, releasing several singles that are now highly regarded, though sales were sluggish at the time. Move on up a Little Higher (1948) became a huge success however, and stores couldn't stock enough of it to meet demand. Jackson rocketed to fame in the US, and soon after in Europe. I Can Put My Trust in Jesus won a prize from the French Academy, while Silent Night was one of the best-selling singles in the history of Norway. She began a radio series on CBS, and signed to Columbia Records in 1954. With her mainstream success came an inevitable backlash from gospel purists who felt she had watered down her sound for popular accessibility.

    Jackson's career in the late 1950s and early 1960s continued to rise when she recorded with Percy Faith, and performed at the 1958 Newport Jazz Festival and the inauguration of John F. Kennedy. She also sang at the funeral of her friend, Martin Luther King, Jr. The late 1960s saw a downturn in her popular success. She ended her career with a concert in Germany in 1971; when she returned, she made one of her final television appearances on The Flip Wilson Show.

    Jackson died in 1972 in Chicago and was buried in Providence Memorial Park, Metairie, Louisiana. She was posthumously inducted into the Gospel Music Association's Gospel Music Hall of Fame in 1978.

    [edit]
    External links
    Biography at FemBio – Notable Women International
    [edit]
    Further readings
    Tony Heilbut, The Gospel Sound: Good News and Bad Times Limelight Editions, 1997, ISBN 0879100346.
    Horace Clarence Boyer, How Sweet the Sound: The Golden Age of Gospel Elliott and Clark, 1995, ISBN 0252068777.
    Retrieved from "http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mahalia_Jackson"
    Categories: 1911 births | 1972 deaths | African Americans | Female singers | Gospel singers | New Orleanians | Hollywood Walk of Fame | Rock and Roll Hall of Fame inductees

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  6. #6
    tommywho70x Guest

    Re: America's Top Black Women

    http://www.civilwarhome.com/tubmanbio.htm

    Harriet Tubman
    1820(?)-l913


    Reverently called "Moses" by the hundreds of slaves she helped to freedom and the thousands of others she inspired, Harriet Tubman became the most famous leader of the Underground Railroad to aid slaves escaping to free states or Canada.
    Born into slavery in Bucktown, Maryland, Tubman escaped her own chains in 1849 to find safe haven in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. She did so through the underground railroad, an elaborate and secret series of houses, tunnels, and roads set up by abolitionists and former slaves. "When I found I had crossed the [Mason-Dixon] line, I looked at my hands to see if I were the same person, " Tubman later wrote. ". . . the sun came like gold through the tree and over the field and I felt like I was in heaven." She would spend the rest of her life helping other slaves escape to freedom.
    Her early life as a slave had been filled with abuse; at the age of 13, when she attempted to save another slave from punishment, she was struck in the head with a two-pound iron weight. She would suffer periodic blackouts from the injury for the rest of her life.
    After her escape, Tubman worked as a maid in Philadelphia and joined the large and active abolitionist group in the city. In 1850, after Congress passed the Fugitive Slave Act, making it illegal to help a runaway slave, Tubman decided to join the Underground Railroad. Her first expedition took place in 1851, when she managed to thread her way through the backwoods to Baltimore and return to the North with her sister and her sister's children. From that time until the onset of the Civil War, Tubman traveled to the South about 18 times and helped close to 300 slaves escape. In 1857, Tubman led her parents to freedom in Auburn, New York, which became her home as well.
    Tubman was never caught and never lost a slave to the Southern militia, and as her reputation grew, so too did the desire among Southerners to put a stop to her activities; rewards for her capture once totaled about $40,000. During the Civil War, Tubman served as a nurse, scout, and sometime-spy for the Union army, mainly in South Carolina. She also took part in a military campaign that resulted in the rescue of 756 slaves and destroyed millions of dollars' worth of enemy property.
    After the war, Tubman returned to Auburn and continued her involvement in social issues, including the women's rights movement. In 1908, she established a home in Auburn for elderly and indigent blacks that later became known as the Harriet Tubman Home. She died on March 10, 1913, at the approximate age of 93.
    Source: The Civil War Society's "Encyclopedia of the Civil War"

    RETURN TO CIVIL WAR BIOGRAPHY PAGE

  7. #7
    tommywho70x Guest

    Re: America's Top Black Women

    This one will draw some photon torpedos from the mighty white right write wrong number ZZZ CUT&BASTE, DRAG&DUMP On: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Angela_Davis

    Angela Yvonne Davis (born January 26, 1944) is an African American radical activist, primarily working for racial and gender equity and for prison abolition.


    Childhood
    Angela Davis was born in 1944 in Birmingham, Alabama, in the days of Jim Crow. Her father, a graduate of St. Augustine's College, a traditional black college in Raleigh, North Carolina, was briefly a high school history teacher. Leaving teaching due to the low salary, he owned and operated a service station in the black section of Birmingham. Her mother, also college educated, was an elementary school teacher with a history of political activism. Using their modest income, the family purchased a large home in a mixed neighborhood where Angela spent most of her youth. The neighborhood, called locally "Dynamite Hill," was marked by racial conflict. She was occasionally able to spend time on her uncle's farm and with friends in New York City.

    During her childhood, Angela experienced the humiliations of racial segregation. She was bright and begged to enter school early, attending Carrie A. Tuggle School, a Black elementary school in dilapidated facilities and later Parker Annex, a similarly dilapidated annex of Parker High School devoted to middle school education. Angela read voraciously. By her junior year, at 14, she applied for and was accepted to both an early admission program at Fisk University and a program of the American Friends Service Committee which placed Black students from the South in integrated schools in the north. She wavered between the two, finally choosing to attend high school at Elizabeth Irwin High School, also known as the Little Red School House, in Greenwich Village in New York City. This was a small private school favored by the radical community. There Angela was exposed to study of socialism and communism and recruited to the Communist youth group, Advance, where she became acquainted with children of the leaders of the Communist Party including her lifelong friend, Bettina Aptheker.

    Education and early career
    Upon graduation from high school, Davis was awarded a full scholarship to Brandeis University in Waltham, Massachusetts, where she was one of three Black students in her freshman class. Initially alienated by the isolation of the campus (at that time she was into Camus and Sartre), she soon made friends with the foreign students on campus. She first encountered Herbert Marcuse at a rally during the Cuban Missile Crisis and later became his student. She worked at part-time jobs earning money to spend her summer in Europe and attend the eighth World Festival for Youth and Students in Helsinki. That summer she spent time in Paris and Switzerland before going on to the Festival in Finland, where she and the other young people were strongly impressed by the energetic Cuban delegation. She returned home to an FBI interview about her attendance at the Festival which the government considered communist sponsored.

    During her second year, she decided to major in French and continued her intensive study of Sartre. Malcolm X appeared at the Brandeis campus that year and strongly castigated his mostly White audience. Davis was accepted for the Hamilton College Junior Year in France Program and managed to talk Brandeis into extending support with her scholarship to cover the expenses. Classes were initially at Biarritz and later at the Sorbonne. In Paris, she lived together with other students with a French family. It was at Biarritz that she received news of the Birmingham church bombing which deeply affected her as she was personally acquainted with the four young victims. Again, as at Brandeis, she was socially isolated; all the other students were Whites who could offer sympathy but did not share her grief. That year President Kennedy was assassinated and there were two Têt, Vietnamese New Year, festivals in Paris, one sponsored by supporters of the South, one by supporters of the North. Davis attended the festival sponsored by the North which featured a clown dressed as an American GI.

    Nearing completion of her degree in French language, she realized her major interest was philosophy. Herbert Marcuse had been at the Sorbonne the year before she attended and there was a good buzz about him. On return to Brandeis, she audited his course (required French courses precluded enrollment). Marcuse turned out to be approachable and helpful; Davis began making plans to attend the University of Frankfurt for graduate work in philosophy. In 1965 she graduated, magna cum laude, a member of Phi Beta Kappa.

    In Germany, having only a stipend of $100 a month to work with and facing the unreconstructed social attitudes of the West Germans, she had great difficulty finding lodging, but after much looking finally found a place with a sympathetic family, later moving with a group of students into a sort of loft in an old factory building. At the University, weak in German, she had great difficulty following the lectures of Adorno but soon found that her fellow students, native Germans, shared her difficulty. Visiting East Berlin during the May Day celebration, she felt that the East German government was dealing better with the residual effects of fascism than the West Germans. Many of her roommates were active in the German Socialist Student League, SDS, a radical student group. Davis participated in actions with them; but things were happening back in the United States, for example, the Black Panther Party, and she was eager to get back. Marcuse in the meantime had moved to the University of California at San Diego. With the permission of Adorno, she followed him there after two years in Frankfurt.

    On her way to California, she stopped off in London to attend a conference centered on the theme of "The Dialectics of Liberation." The small Black contingent included Stokely Carmichael and Michael X a local West Indian activist. Davis was sporting her trademark natural hairstyle by then and was thus identifiable as a sympathizer with the Black Power movement. Although moved by Stokely Carmichael's fiery rhetoric, she was disappointed by the Black nationalist sentiments of the Black contingent and their rejection of communism as a "white man's thing." She held the view that nationalism was a barrier to grappling with the underlying issue, capitalist domination of working people of all races.

    Once in San Diego, she earned a master's degree from the University of California, San Diego, returning to Germany for her Ph.D. in Philosophy from the Humboldt University of Berlin, GDR Davis worked as a philosophy lecturer at the University of California, Los Angeles, during the 1960s, during which time she also was a radical feminist and activist, a member of the Communist Party USA and associated with the Black Panther Party. In a controversial decision, the University of California fired her from her job in 1969 because of her membership in the Communist Party. She was later rehired after community uproar over the decision. Davis ran for Vice President on the Communist ticket in 1980 and 1984 along with Gus Hall.

    Notoriety

    Cuban poster saying: "Freedom for Angela Davis.", 1971In 1970 Davis became the third woman to appear on the FBI's Most Wanted List when she was charged with conspiracy, kidnapping, and homicide, due to her alleged participation in an escape attempt from Marin County Hall of Justice. She evaded the police for two months before being captured, tried, and acquitted of all charges eighteen months later. Allegedly, Johnathan Jackson, younger brother of prison inmate and cause célèbre, George Jackson, had stolen the guns from Angela's home to use in the escape attempt. While being held in the Women's Detention Center in New York City, Davis got on well with other inmates and with the help of her outside supporters was able to mobilize the prisoners, in particular, helping to initiate a bail program for indigent prisoners. Initially, she was segregated from the general population in deplorable conditions, but with the help of her excellent legal team was able in short order obtain a Federal court order squashing that practice. The excuse was that prisoners might be hostile to her, but, in fact, most of the other prisoners were friendly and supportive. In 1972, she was exonerated on all charges.

    In 1972 John Lennon and Yoko Ono released the song "Angela" about her and Rolling Stones released "Sweet Black Angel" which chronicled her legal problems and agitated for her release.

    Later career
    She has continued a career of activism, and has written several books. A principal focus of her current activism is the state of prisons within the United States. She considers herself an abolitionist, not a "prison reformer," and refers to the United States prison system as the "prison-industrial complex." Her solutions include abolishing prisons and addressing the class, race, and gender factors that have led to large numbers of blacks and Latinos being incarcerated. She has lectured at San Francisco State University, Stanford University and other schools. She is currently a UC Presidential Chair and professor with the History of Consciousness department at the University of California, Santa Cruz and director of the Women's studies department. She states that in her teaching, which is mostly at the graduate level, she concentrates more on posing questions which encourage development of critical thinking than on imparting knowledge.

    .

  8. #8
    tommywho70x Guest

    Re: America's Top Black Women

    Quote Originally Posted by PAYEK
    Tommy....aren't you gonna add Oprah to the list?....LOL :D
    got to your grocery store and read all about her in the tabloids.

    i'm a Producer/Director/Performing Artist; dOprah Winfrey is a talk show hostess with an eating disorder.

    this is between me and CV. This is my list of African-American Women who did socially SIGNIFICANT things and were REAL performing artists; not a photogenic OREO.

    Are you taking rudeness lessons from your old man now?
    Last edited by tommywho70x; 10-26-2005 at 10:13 AM.

  9. #9
    tommywho70x Guest

    Re: America's Top Black Women

    Sarah Vaughan
    From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia.
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    Sarah Lois Vaughan (March 27, 1924 – April 3, 1990) is considered by some to be one of the greatest female jazz singers in the history of the genre, along with Billie Holiday and Ella Fitzgerald. Originally from Newark, New Jersey , she began performing with Earl Hines in the early 1940s, but soon broke away with Billy Eckstine. Eckstine and Vaughan, along with Dizzy Gillespie and Charlie Parker stayed together for a time, though she went solo in 1945. "Tenderly" and "It's Magic" became popular during the late 1940s, and she continued to build on her fanbase in the 1950s with songs like "Misty" and "Broken-Hearted Melody." She continued playing with some of the biggest names in the business, including Miles Davis and Jimmy Jones.

    Vaughan was married four times: to bandleader George Treadwell, to professional football player Clyde Atkins, to Las Vegas restaurateur Marshall Fisher, and to jazz trumpeter Waymon Reed; all ended in divorce.

    Nicknamed "Sassy", Vaughan continued recording jazz and pop material on a variety of labels in the 1950s, 60s, 70s and early 80s. She died in 1990.

    Retrieved from "http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sarah_Vaughan"
    Categories: 1924 births | 1990 deaths | African Americans | American singers | American jazz singers | New Jersey musicians

    This page was last modified 12:10, 23 October 2005. All text is available under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License (see Copyrights for details).
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  10. #10
    tommywho70x Guest

    Re: America's Top Black Women

    Coretta Scott King
    From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia.
    Jump to: navigation, search

    Coretta Scott KingCoretta Scott King (born April 27, 1927 near Marion, Alabama) is the widow of the slain civil rights activist Martin Luther King, Jr. and a noted community leader in her own right.

    The Kings were married on June 18, 1953. The wedding ceremony took place in Scott's parents' house in Marion and was performed by King's father.

    King and Scott had four children:

    Yolanda Denise King (November 17, 1955, Montgomery, Alabama)
    Martin Luther King III (October 23, 1957, Montgomery, Alabama)
    Dexter Scott King (January 30, 1961, Atlanta, Georgia)
    Bernice Albertine King (March 28, 1963, Atlanta, Georgia)
    The four children all have one thing in common: They have followed their father's footsteps as civil rights activists, although pet issues and opinions differ among the King children.

    She has been vocal in her opposition to capital punishment and the 2003 Invasion of Iraq, thus drawing criticism from conservative groups. Mrs. King is also a vocal advocate of women's rights, lesbian and gay rights and AIDS/HIV prevention.

    There is a medal named after Mrs. King that is awarded for excellence in children's literature.

    Over the years, she has not only been active in preserving the memory of her husband, but also active in other political issues. After her husband was assassinated, she began attending a commemorative service at Ebenezer Baptist Church in Atlanta to mark her husband's birth every January 15 (now on the third Monday in January since Martin Luther King Day was proclaimed). She also has honored presidents in different occasions. Some of them include being at the state funeral of former president Lyndon Johnson, in 1973, being present when President Ronald Reagan signed legislation establishing Martin Luther King Day, and being present at the first inauguration of George W. Bush in 2001.

    On August 16, 2005, Mrs. King was hospitalized after suffering a stroke and a mild heart attack. Initially,she was unable to speak and move her right side. She was released from Piedmont Hospital in Atlanta on September 22, 2005, after regaining some of her speech and will continue physical therapy at home.

    [edit]
    External links
    Coretta Scott King's political donations
    About.com Profile of Coretta Scott King, Human Rights Advocate
    Retrieved from "http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Coretta_Scott_King"
    Categories: 1927 births | African Americans | Martin Luther King, Jr. | People from Alabama | Vegetarians


    This page was last modified 06:07, 22 October 2005. All text is available under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License (see Copyrights for details).
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  11. #11
    Join Date
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    Re: America's Top Black Women

    I know, I know...she can't sing and she is not for the "abolition of prisons", she has not been on the FBI's most wanted list nor has she been dead for a hundred years...but she has twice been named the world's most powerful woman. And not just by me.



    Condoleezza Rice, Ph.D. (born November 14, 1954), is the 66th and current United States Secretary of State, and the second in the administration of President George W. Bush. She replaced Colin Powell on January 26, 2005 to become the first African American woman, second African American (after Powell), and second woman (after Madeleine Albright) to serve in that post.

    Condoleezza Rice was previously Bush's National Security Advisor during his first term (2001–2005). Before joining the Bush administration, she was a Professor of Political Science at Stanford University and served as Provost from 1993 to 1999.

    In August 2004 [1] and again in August 2005 [2], Forbes magazine named Rice the world's most powerful woman.

    [edit]
    Childhood
    Condoleezza Rice was born in Birmingham, Alabama, the only child of Angelena Rice and the Reverend John Wesley Rice (Jr.). Her father was a minister at Westminster Presbyterian Church, and her mother was a music teacher. The name "Condoleezza" is a derivation of the Italian music-related expression, "Con dolcezza", meaning "with sweetness". [3]


    She was born the same year as the landmark Brown v. Board of Education decision. Rice was eight when her schoolmate Denise McNair was killed in the bombing of the primarily African-American Sixteenth Street Baptist Church by white supremacists on September 15, 1963. Rice states that growing up during racial segregation taught her determination against adversity, and the need to be "twice as good" as non-minorities [5].

    [edit]
    Education
    After studying piano at an Aspen music camp, Rice enrolled at the University of Denver, where her father both served as an assistant dean and taught a class called "The Black Experience in America." [6]

    At age 15, Rice began classes with the goal of becoming a concert pianist. Her plans changed when she attended a course on international politics taught by Josef Korbel, the father of former Secretary of State Madeleine Albright. This experience sparked her interest in the Soviet Union and international relations and led her to call Korbel, "one of the most central figures in my life" [7].

    In 1974, at age 19, Rice earned her B.A. in political science (cum laude) and Phi Beta Kappa, from the University of Denver. In 1975, she obtained her Master's Degree from the University of Notre Dame. In 1976 she switched her party registration/affiliation to the Republican Party. She first worked in the State Department in 1977, during the Carter administration, as an intern in the Bureau of Educational and Cultural Affairs. In 1981, at age 26, she received her Ph.D. from the Graduate School of International Studies at the University of Denver. In addition to English, she speaks Russian, French, and Spanish.

    [edit]
    Academic career
    NOTE: This comment is attached to a picture of Ms. Rice by the previously respected wikipedia website.:
    Condoleezza Rice has been praised for her fashion sense.

    At Stanford University, Rice was an Assistant Professor, Political Science (1981-1987), Associate Professor (1987-1993), tenured Professor of Political Science (1993-July 2000), (see [8]], Senior Fellow of the Institute for International Studies, and a Senior Fellow (by courtesy) of the Hoover Institution. She was a specialist on the former Soviet Union and gave lectures on the subject for the Berkeley-Stanford joint program led by U.C. Berkeley's George Breslauer in the mid-1980s. She was regarded as moderately conservative at the time. However, she kept her political opinions out of her scholarship. She also was an avid reader of Leo Tolstoy and Dostoyevsky, and once told a friend she leaned toward the latter in her world view. She was quietly cerebral, friendly but decorous, and always popular among students. They often saw her exercising in the gym. From 1993 to 1999 she served as the Stanford Provost, the chief budget and academic officer of the university. Yet, she managed to maintain friendly contact with various student associations, such as the Venezuelan Student Organization. After departing to enter government service, she returned to Stanford in June 2002 to deliver the commencement address.

    Rice is a Fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences and has been awarded honorary doctorates from Morehouse College in 1991, the University of Alabama in 1994, the University of Notre Dame in 1995, the Mississippi College School of Law in 2003, the University of Louisville and Michigan State University in 2004.

    Rice has written or collaborated on several books, including Germany Unified and Europe Transformed (1995), The Gorbachev Era (1986), and Uncertain Allegiance: The Soviet Union and the Czechoslovak Army (1984).

    [edit]
    Business career
    Rice has served on the board of directors for the Chevron Corporation, the Charles Schwab Corporation, the William and Flora Hewlett Foundation, Transamerica Corporation, Hewlett Packard, The Carnegie Corporation, The Carnegie Endowment for International Peace, The Rand Corporation, and KQED, public broadcasting for San Francisco.

    She was also on the Board of Trustees of the University of Notre Dame, the International Advisory Council of J.P. Morgan, and the San Francisco Symphony Board of Governors.

    Chevron honored Rice by naming an oil tanker Condoleezza Rice after her, but controversy led to its being renamed Altair Voyager [9],[10], and [11]

    She also headed Chevron's committee on public policy until she resigned on January 15, 2001, to become National Security Advisor to President George W. Bush.

    Rice has also been active in community affairs. She was a founding board member of the Center for a New Generation, an educational support fund for schools in East Palo Alto, California and East Menlo Park, California, and was Vice President of the Boys and Girls Clubs of America of the San Francisco Bay Area.

    In addition, her past board service has encompassed such organizations as the National Council for Soviet and East European Studies, and the Mid-Peninsula Urban Coalition.



    wikipedia

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Location
    Nunya
    Posts
    996

    Re: America's Top Black Women

    Cannot forget


    Janice R. Brown, Anne Wortham, Eileen Gardener and Claudia Butts.

  13. #13
    Lenny Loosejocks Guest

    Re: America's Top Black Women

    Quote Originally Posted by tommywho70x
    got to your grocery store and read all about her in the tabloids.

    i'm a Producer/Director/Performing Artist; dOprah Winfrey is a talk show hostess with an eating disorder.

    this is between me and CV. This is my list of African-American Women who did socially SIGNIFICANT things and were REAL performing artists; not a photogenic OREO.

    Are you taking rudeness lessons from your old man now?
    Been away taking care of biz for a while! When did you turn into a Completely Uncaring Nasty Turd?

    :confused:


  14. #14
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Location
    tornado alley
    Posts
    132

    Re: America's Top Black Women

    Quote Originally Posted by Lenny Loosejocks
    Been away taking care of biz for a while! When did you turn into a Completely Uncaring Nasty Turd?

    :confused:

    That's what I was thinking too.... :rolleyes:

  15. #15
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Posts
    3,088

    Re: America's Top Black Women

    Thanks... AMAZING women.. ALL of them. :)

    One of my favorite poets/authors is Maya Angelou. I sometimes listen to her recordings when I'm driving - her voice is very calming....

  16. #16
    tommywho70x Guest

    Re: America's Top Black Women

    Quote Originally Posted by Lenny Loosejocks
    Been away taking care of biz for a while! When did you turn into a Completely Uncaring Nasty Turd?

    :confused:

    Go read the Rosa Parks thread. Oprah Winfrey pulled a NIMBY move on hemp activists several years ago that impacted my colleagues in a C.U.N.T.ish way that cost them a lot of money, time in jail and court cases.

    She purchased property in a depressed northern Indiana agricultural community and used the local sheriffs as her private paramilitary security service to prevent them from holding a hemp education music festival on their land.

    Their farm was kept under siege for several weeks -- there were a lot of arrests for petty garbage (no drugs) and the festival never happened.

    Also, I have been on the fringes of the entertainment industry all of my life and for the past 20 years, deep in the underground music and thespian scene; there are a lot of bodies buried -- some of them close friends and to me that whole talk TV scene is a major part of the general malaise that is television in the role it plays in brainwashing the dumbed down kept sheeple.

    I don't think that there's anything about my attitude about Ms. Winfrey that is especially turdish and that my distaste for her is well-founded. Payek's question was intentionally rude and she knows it.

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