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  1. #1
    sojustask's Avatar
    sojustask is offline The Late, Great Lady Mod - Retired User Rank
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    First the Bees, NOW the Birds, what next?

    Maybe a connection? An early warning if nothing else...Will we heed the warning though?
    **********************************************

    Millions of Missing Birds, Vanishing in Plain Sight
    By VERLYN KLINKENBORG
    Published: June 19, 2007

    Last week, the Audubon Society released a new report describing the sharp and startling population decline of some of the most familiar and common birds in America: several kinds of sparrows, the Northern bobwhite, the Eastern meadowlark, the common grackle and the common tern. The average decline of the 20 species in the Audubon Societyís report is 68 percent.

    Forty years ago, there were an estimated 31 million bobwhites. Now there are 5.5 million. Compared to the hundred-some condors presently in the wild, 5.5 million bobwhites sounds like a lot of birds. But what matters is the 25.5 million missing and the troubles that brought them down ó and are all too likely to bring down the rest of them, too. So this is not extinction, but it is how things look before extinction happens.

    The word ďextinctĒ somehow brings to mind the birds that seem like special cases to us, the dodo or the great auk or the passenger pigeon. Most people would never have had a chance to see dodos and great auks on their remote islands before they were decimated in the 17th and 19th centuries. What is hard to remember about passenger pigeons isnít merely their once enormous numbers. Itís the enormous numbers of humans to whom their comings and goings were a common sight and who supposed, erroneously, that such unending clouds of birds were indestructible. We recognize the extraordinary distinctness of the passenger pigeon now because we know its fate, killed off largely by humans. But we have moralized it thoroughly without ever really taking it to heart.

    The question is whether we will see the distinctness of the field sparrow ó its number is down from 18 million 40 years ago to 5.8 million ó only when the last pair is being kept alive in a zoo somewhere. We love to finally care when the death watch is on. It makes us feel so very human.

    Like you, Iíve been reading dire reports of declining species for many years now. They have the value of causing us to pay attention to species in trouble, and the sad fact is that the only species likely to endure are the ones we humans manage to pay attention to. There was a time when it was better, if you were a nonhuman species, to be ignored by humans because we trapped, shot or otherwise exploited all of the ones that got our attention. But in the past 40 years, we have killed all those millions of birds or, let us say, unintentionally caused a dramatic population loss, simply by going about business as usual.

    Agriculture has intensified. So has development. Open space has been sharply reduced. We have simply pursued our livelihoods. We knew it was inimical to wolves and mountain lions. But we somehow trusted that all the innocent little birds were here to stay. What they actually need to survive, it turns out, is a landscape that is less intensely human.

    The Audubon Society portrait of common bird species in decline is really a report on who humans are. Let me offer a proposition about Homo sapiens. We are the only species on earth capable of an ethical awareness of other species and, thus, the only species capable of happily ignoring that awareness. So far, our economic interests have proved to be completely incompatible with all but a very few forms of life. Itís not that we believe that other species donít matter. Itís that, historically speaking, it hasnít been worth believing one way or another. I donít suppose that most Americans would actively kill a whippoorwill if they had the chance. Yet in the past 40 years its number has dropped by 1.6 million.

    In our everyday economic behavior, we seem determined to discover whether we can live alone on earth. E.O. Wilson has argued eloquently and persuasively that we cannot, that who we are depends as much on the richness and diversity of the biological life around us as it does on any inherent quality in our genes. Environmentalists of every stripe argue that we must somehow begin to correlate our economic behavior ó by which I mean every aspect of it: production, consumption, habitation ó with the welfare of other species.

    This is the premise of sustainability. But the very foundation of our economic interests is self-interest, and in the survival of other species we see way too little self to care.

    The trouble with humans is that even the smallest changes in our behavior require an epiphany. And yet compared to the fixity of other species, the narrowness of their habitats, the strictness of their diets, the precision of the niches they occupy, we are flexibility itself.

    We look around us, expecting the rest of the worldís occupants to adapt to the changes that we have caused, when, in fact, we have the right to expect adaptation only from ourselves.

    .

  2. #2
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    Re: First the Bees, NOW the Birds, what next?

    Quote Originally Posted by sojustask
    Maybe a connection? An early warning if nothing else...Will we heed the warning though?
    **********************************************

    Millions of Missing Birds, Vanishing in Plain Sight
    By VERLYN KLINKENBORG
    Published: June 19, 2007

    Last week, the Audubon Society released a new report describing the sharp and startling population decline of some of the most familiar and common birds in America: several kinds of sparrows, the Northern bobwhite, the Eastern meadowlark, the common grackle and the common tern. The average decline of the 20 species in the Audubon Societyís report is 68 percent.

    Forty years ago, there were an estimated 31 million bobwhites. Now there are 5.5 million. Compared to the hundred-some condors presently in the wild, 5.5 million bobwhites sounds like a lot of birds. But what matters is the 25.5 million missing and the troubles that brought them down ó and are all too likely to bring down the rest of them, too. So this is not extinction, but it is how things look before extinction happens.

    The word ďextinctĒ somehow brings to mind the birds that seem like special cases to us, the dodo or the great auk or the passenger pigeon. Most people would never have had a chance to see dodos and great auks on their remote islands before they were decimated in the 17th and 19th centuries. What is hard to remember about passenger pigeons isnít merely their once enormous numbers. Itís the enormous numbers of humans to whom their comings and goings were a common sight and who supposed, erroneously, that such unending clouds of birds were indestructible. We recognize the extraordinary distinctness of the passenger pigeon now because we know its fate, killed off largely by humans. But we have moralized it thoroughly without ever really taking it to heart.

    The question is whether we will see the distinctness of the field sparrow ó its number is down from 18 million 40 years ago to 5.8 million ó only when the last pair is being kept alive in a zoo somewhere. We love to finally care when the death watch is on. It makes us feel so very human.

    Like you, Iíve been reading dire reports of declining species for many years now. They have the value of causing us to pay attention to species in trouble, and the sad fact is that the only species likely to endure are the ones we humans manage to pay attention to. There was a time when it was better, if you were a nonhuman species, to be ignored by humans because we trapped, shot or otherwise exploited all of the ones that got our attention. But in the past 40 years, we have killed all those millions of birds or, let us say, unintentionally caused a dramatic population loss, simply by going about business as usual.

    Agriculture has intensified. So has development. Open space has been sharply reduced. We have simply pursued our livelihoods. We knew it was inimical to wolves and mountain lions. But we somehow trusted that all the innocent little birds were here to stay. What they actually need to survive, it turns out, is a landscape that is less intensely human.

    The Audubon Society portrait of common bird species in decline is really a report on who humans are. Let me offer a proposition about Homo sapiens. We are the only species on earth capable of an ethical awareness of other species and, thus, the only species capable of happily ignoring that awareness. So far, our economic interests have proved to be completely incompatible with all but a very few forms of life. Itís not that we believe that other species donít matter. Itís that, historically speaking, it hasnít been worth believing one way or another. I donít suppose that most Americans would actively kill a whippoorwill if they had the chance. Yet in the past 40 years its number has dropped by 1.6 million.

    In our everyday economic behavior, we seem determined to discover whether we can live alone on earth. E.O. Wilson has argued eloquently and persuasively that we cannot, that who we are depends as much on the richness and diversity of the biological life around us as it does on any inherent quality in our genes. Environmentalists of every stripe argue that we must somehow begin to correlate our economic behavior ó by which I mean every aspect of it: production, consumption, habitation ó with the welfare of other species.

    This is the premise of sustainability. But the very foundation of our economic interests is self-interest, and in the survival of other species we see way too little self to care.

    The trouble with humans is that even the smallest changes in our behavior require an epiphany. And yet compared to the fixity of other species, the narrowness of their habitats, the strictness of their diets, the precision of the niches they occupy, we are flexibility itself.

    We look around us, expecting the rest of the worldís occupants to adapt to the changes that we have caused, when, in fact, we have the right to expect adaptation only from ourselves.

    .
    I'm pretty sure you won't count this as irrelevant, LM (the other posters do), but the Lord is cutting off our food supply. He's forcing an economic collapse, in His timing. A recession+famine=depression.

    Too many father's have cursed their children (not just by abortion). Our Presidents have forced the Israeli's to divide up their land too many times (which Jehovah hates, and has promised to punish). And now our current politicians are forcing laws that were unthinkable (morally speaking) in the previous century.

    The 1-generation (40 years) after Israel got Jerusalem just went by, without a change of repentance. And now, the Lord will give them what they want; peace by means of a leader other than the first Messiah.

    We're going by way of Ancient Egypt, during the time of Pharaoh and Joseph.

  3. #3
    BVR USA Liaison Guest

    Re: First the Bees, NOW the Birds, what next?

    Quote Originally Posted by EveryKnee
    I'm pretty sure you won't count this as irrelevant, LM (the other posters do), but the Lord is cutting off our food supply. He's forcing an economic collapse, in His timing. A recession+famine=depression.

    Too many father's have cursed their children (not just by abortion). Our Presidents have forced the Israeli's to divide up their land too many times (which Jehovah hates, and has promised to punish). And now our current politicians are forcing laws that were unthinkable (morally speaking) in the previous century.

    The 1-generation (40 years) after Israel got Jerusalem just went by, without a change of repentance. And now, the Lord will give them what they want; peace by means of a leader other than the first Messiah.

    We're going by way of Ancient Egypt, during the time of Pharaoh and Joseph.
    amen brother :D

  4. #4
    BVR USA Liaison Guest

    Re: First the Bees, NOW the Birds, what next?

    Quote Originally Posted by sojustask
    Maybe a connection? An early warning if nothing else...Will we heed the warning though?
    **********************************************

    Millions of Missing Birds, Vanishing in Plain Sight
    By VERLYN KLINKENBORG
    Published: June 19, 2007

    Last week, the Audubon Society released a new report describing the sharp and startling population decline of some of the most familiar and common birds in America: several kinds of sparrows, the Northern bobwhite, the Eastern meadowlark, the common grackle and the common tern. The average decline of the 20 species in the Audubon Societyís report is 68 percent.

    Forty years ago, there were an estimated 31 million bobwhites. Now there are 5.5 million. Compared to the hundred-some condors presently in the wild, 5.5 million bobwhites sounds like a lot of birds. But what matters is the 25.5 million missing and the troubles that brought them down ó and are all too likely to bring down the rest of them, too. So this is not extinction, but it is how things look before extinction happens.

    The word ďextinctĒ somehow brings to mind the birds that seem like special cases to us, the dodo or the great auk or the passenger pigeon. Most people would never have had a chance to see dodos and great auks on their remote islands before they were decimated in the 17th and 19th centuries. What is hard to remember about passenger pigeons isnít merely their once enormous numbers. Itís the enormous numbers of humans to whom their comings and goings were a common sight and who supposed, erroneously, that such unending clouds of birds were indestructible. We recognize the extraordinary distinctness of the passenger pigeon now because we know its fate, killed off largely by humans. But we have moralized it thoroughly without ever really taking it to heart.

    The question is whether we will see the distinctness of the field sparrow ó its number is down from 18 million 40 years ago to 5.8 million ó only when the last pair is being kept alive in a zoo somewhere. We love to finally care when the death watch is on. It makes us feel so very human.

    Like you, Iíve been reading dire reports of declining species for many years now. They have the value of causing us to pay attention to species in trouble, and the sad fact is that the only species likely to endure are the ones we humans manage to pay attention to. There was a time when it was better, if you were a nonhuman species, to be ignored by humans because we trapped, shot or otherwise exploited all of the ones that got our attention. But in the past 40 years, we have killed all those millions of birds or, let us say, unintentionally caused a dramatic population loss, simply by going about business as usual.

    Agriculture has intensified. So has development. Open space has been sharply reduced. We have simply pursued our livelihoods. We knew it was inimical to wolves and mountain lions. But we somehow trusted that all the innocent little birds were here to stay. What they actually need to survive, it turns out, is a landscape that is less intensely human.

    The Audubon Society portrait of common bird species in decline is really a report on who humans are. Let me offer a proposition about Homo sapiens. We are the only species on earth capable of an ethical awareness of other species and, thus, the only species capable of happily ignoring that awareness. So far, our economic interests have proved to be completely incompatible with all but a very few forms of life. Itís not that we believe that other species donít matter. Itís that, historically speaking, it hasnít been worth believing one way or another. I donít suppose that most Americans would actively kill a whippoorwill if they had the chance. Yet in the past 40 years its number has dropped by 1.6 million.

    In our everyday economic behavior, we seem determined to discover whether we can live alone on earth. E.O. Wilson has argued eloquently and persuasively that we cannot, that who we are depends as much on the richness and diversity of the biological life around us as it does on any inherent quality in our genes. Environmentalists of every stripe argue that we must somehow begin to correlate our economic behavior ó by which I mean every aspect of it: production, consumption, habitation ó with the welfare of other species.

    This is the premise of sustainability. But the very foundation of our economic interests is self-interest, and in the survival of other species we see way too little self to care.

    The trouble with humans is that even the smallest changes in our behavior require an epiphany. And yet compared to the fixity of other species, the narrowness of their habitats, the strictness of their diets, the precision of the niches they occupy, we are flexibility itself.

    We look around us, expecting the rest of the worldís occupants to adapt to the changes that we have caused, when, in fact, we have the right to expect adaptation only from ourselves.

    .
    It is as prophesied in Matthew 24 and it is a rehash of the times of Noah and no one will notice until the doors to the "Ark" clang shut and the "Rain" starts to pour! Excellent article btw I will use it in other forums!!! :D

  5. #5
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    Re: First the Bees, NOW the Birds, what next?

    I sure hope the crabs aren't high on the list...

  6. #6
    sojustask's Avatar
    sojustask is offline The Late, Great Lady Mod - Retired User Rank
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    Re: First the Bees, NOW the Birds, what next?

    Quote Originally Posted by EveryKnee
    I'm pretty sure you won't count this as irrelevant, LM (the other posters do), but the Lord is cutting off our food supply. He's forcing an economic collapse, in His timing. A recession+famine=depression.

    Too many father's have cursed their children (not just by abortion). Our Presidents have forced the Israeli's to divide up their land too many times (which Jehovah hates, and has promised to punish). And now our current politicians are forcing laws that were unthinkable (morally speaking) in the previous century.

    The 1-generation (40 years) after Israel got Jerusalem just went by, without a change of repentance. And now, the Lord will give them what they want; peace by means of a leader other than the first Messiah.

    We're going by way of Ancient Egypt, during the time of Pharaoh and Joseph.

    Well, about 30.5 years until total extinction of the sparrows. Of course, that's just sparrows and only losing them at the current rate.

    Lose sparrows, then birds of prey. We don't eat them either. But we need them to spread stuff around.

    We still have mammals to go. I figure eventually we'll be overrun with rodents, cockroaches and vultures.

    I'm not discounting what you say, I just don't think it has anything to do with the end times. I think this is more of a result of reaping what we sow. We were to tend the earth and make it fruitful. Not rape it and destroy it's inhabitants. Every sin has a built in consequence.

    Lady Mod
    Last edited by sojustask; 06-20-2007 at 06:23 AM.

  7. #7
    BVR USA Liaison Guest

    Re: First the Bees, NOW the Birds, what next?

    Quote Originally Posted by sojustask
    Well, about 30.5 years until total extinction of the sparrows. Of course, that's just sparrows and only losing them at the current rate.

    Lose sparrows, then birds of prey. We don't eat them either. But we need them to spread stuff around.

    We still have mammals to go. I figure eventually we'll be overrun with rodents, cockroaches and vultures.

    I'm not discounting what you say, I just don't think it has anything to do with the end times. I think this is more of a result of reaping what we sow. We were to tend the earth and make if fruitful. Not rape it and destroy it's inhabitants. Every sin has a built in consequence.

    Lady Mod
    good point :D

  8. #8
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    Re: First the Bees, NOW the Birds, what next?

    Quote Originally Posted by BVR USA Liaison
    It is as prophesied in Matthew 24 and it is a rehash of the times of Noah and no one will notice until the doors to the "Ark" clang shut and the "Rain" starts to pour! Excellent article btw I will use it in other forums!!! :D
    I'm amazed that people are oblivious to the droughts in this country. No one is noticing.
    But yes, people will continue to marry and be given in marriage...things will continue on as if it's any other day like yesterday.

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    Re: First the Bees, NOW the Birds, what next?

    Quote Originally Posted by Blue Crab of PAIN!!!
    I sure hope the crabs aren't high on the list...
    The brown, red, orange and green crabs will survive. The rest are doomed.

  10. #10
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    Re: First the Bees, NOW the Birds, what next?

    Quote Originally Posted by sojustask
    Well, about 30.5 years until total extinction of the sparrows. Of course, that's just sparrows and only losing them at the current rate.

    Lose sparrows, then birds of prey. We don't eat them either. But we need them to spread stuff around.

    We still have mammals to go. I figure eventually we'll be overrun with rodents, cockroaches and vultures.

    I'm not discounting what you say, I just don't think it has anything to do with the end times. I think this is more of a result of reaping what we sow. We were to tend the earth and make it fruitful. Not rape it and destroy it's inhabitants. Every sin has a built in consequence.

    Lady Mod
    I think what you've written has merit, although things seem to be accelerating at a pace that is alarming scientists.

  11. #11
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    Re: First the Bees, NOW the Birds, what next?

    Quote Originally Posted by EveryKnee
    I think what you've written has merit, although things seem to be accelerating at a pace that is alarming scientists.
    I wonder if it's alarming them because it's really happening so fast, there is a political statement to be made OR because they just finally decided to notice it?

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    Re: First the Bees, NOW the Birds, what next?

    I live in the same home I was raised in. My father, brother and I used to bird hunt all around here. We followed all the hunting regs and bag limits. We rarely got enough between the three of us to meet the bag limit for 1 person. Not because they were hard to find, we just were not that great at hitting them. And Pop always taught us to take what you need to feed the family and maybe put enough in the freezer for one more meal. If that was less than the bag limit, then you didn't go for the bag limit, and never to hunt outside of the season so the birds could reproduce and replenish their numbers. There was always plenty..more than enough. And we never took more than enough. That was 25 to 30 years ago.

    Now there are so many apartments, stores, and the like built up around the land, that we never even hear a bobwhite much less see one anymore. I'll take credit for the birds I hunted, but I seriously believe it was the loss of the habitat that made them disappear. It's a really shame, I always enjoyed just going out and watching the wildlife as much as I enjoy hunting.

    But Pop's gone now and so are those days of old, along with much of the woods I plundered in when growing up. I miss them all. Now before I tear up..
    Is it God's wrath? Maybe.
    A sign of the end of times and revelations coming to pass? Could be.
    Humans disregard for nature and the results of our actions? Most likely.
    An intermingling of the aforementioned? Very likely as man will cause his own destruction. Believe in God or not, the evidence that humans will cause their own destruction is there; has been for awhile now.
    These are just my observations and opinions. I'm just a dumb southern redneck, and ought not be taken seriously. :D
    Last edited by carolinahound; 06-20-2007 at 07:34 AM.

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    Re: First the Bees, NOW the Birds, what next?

    A lot of mindless yapping here from the fundies fails to recognize one important point.
    The wrong headedness that caused most of this environmental destruction stems from one demented Christian Belief, Dominionism.
    All the early settlers in North America were afflicted with this form of mental illness.
    They were convinced that they could reshape the land massacre the Buffalo, Passenger Pigeon and any creature they deemed useless to replace them with pigs. Cattle and fowl.
    This delusional behavior lead to many extinctions some we may never know about because few early settlers bothered to catalog native species .
    If there is a just and righteous god his wrath will be felt by them.
    This has nothing to do with Israel or abortion.
    This destruction was caused by Christians who used the bible to justify their greed. and stupidity.
    Last edited by Phinnly Slash Buster; 06-20-2007 at 06:46 PM.

  14. #14
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    Re: First the Bees, NOW the Birds, what next?

    Quote Originally Posted by Phinnly Slash Buster
    A lot of mindless yapping here from the fundies fails to recognize one important point.
    The wrong headedness that caused most of this environmental destruction stems from one demented Christian Belief, Dominionism.
    All the early settlers in North America were afflicted with this form of mental illness.
    They were convinced that they could reshape the land massacre the Buffalo, Passenger Pigeon and any creature they deemed useless to replace them with pigs. Cattle and fowl.
    This delusional behavior lead to many extinctions some we may never know about because few early settlers bothered to catalog native species .
    If there is a just and righteous god his wrath will be felt by them.
    This has nothing to do with Israel or abortion.
    This destruction was caused by Christians who used the bible to justify their greed. and stupidity.
    I think I said something similar, just not in the "in your face" manner. ;)

    Quote Originally Posted by sojustask
    I think this is more of a result of reaping what we sow. We were to tend the earth and make it fruitful. Not rape it and destroy it's inhabitants. Every sin has a built in consequence.

    Namaste'

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    Re: First the Bees, NOW the Birds, what next?

    i think PSB just said he believes in god!?either that or he is just looking for a scapegoat!?it's obvious that man has dominion over the earth!?thanks to science anyway!?and yet PSB wants to CREDIT religion for this ability!?cant have it both ways!?it's like saying,without christianity/religion,abuse or greed would not exist!?or you could say,without science,abuse and greed would not be so ALL THREATENING!?hehe!!.....just askn...
    i do not endorse/recommend any advertising on scam.com associated with my name /posts or otherwise. thank you

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    Re: First the Bees, NOW the Birds, what next?

    Nooooo! Not the birds! The ecosystems will be f'ed up without them! :(

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