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  1. #1
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    My Experience with an MLM Rep

    So, I thought I would post my own personal experience with an MLM rep here, you know, as a community service and all. I won't mention the company name here(ok, it was Quixtar :).) Anyway, some guy approaches me in a bookstore, notices I'm reading a business magazine and gives me a line about how I could be getting involved in a "truly unique business opportunity".

    Well, I was just bored enough to be mildly interested, so I thought I would listen to what he had to say. Not five minutes into the conversation, the guy is showing me pictures of the new Mercedes he and his wife are about to buy. :rolleyes: Yeah right. Of course, he evades the question of how much money he's actually making at the time.

    Then, in his dazzling description of the MLM business model, he starts to "draw circles" for me. You know, the " you find 5 people who find 5 people" routine. "And yes, in just a few short years, everyone on the face of the earth will be in your down line, my friend." Ok - I made up that last line, but you get the point. :)

    He says I can start by buying my everyday products from the company. Is this really a convincing sales pitch to anyone? I'm sorry, but if I need a tube of toothpaste, I'll drive to my local Walgreens, thank you. Why pay twice the price at your website just so I can receive a paltry "commission" that would never make up the difference?

    Overall, I thought the presentation was pretty transparent and not very convincing. Are all MLM presentations this lame? I'm interested in hearing about the experiences of others. Did the rep actually get you excited about the "opportunity" or was it a waste of your time?
    I'm not selling anything at the moment, but thanks for viewing my signature!

  2. #2
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    Re: My Experience with an MLM Rep

    Sounds right to me. They are all pretty lame!
    Yes, I know I can't spell. I just type to fast, don't care and don't have enough time to spell check.
    So please judge my post on content, not spelling.

  3. #3
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    Re: My Experience with an MLM Rep

    I guess what I'm really trying to figure out here is, what actually convinced people to "sign on the dotted line" so to speak, for the first time? Despite all of the hype that seems to fly around this board, there really do seem to be some reasonably thoughtful people here that are active in MLM.

    Is this kind of presentation all it took to win them over?
    I'm not selling anything at the moment, but thanks for viewing my signature!

  4. #4
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    Re: My Experience with an MLM Rep

    Quote Originally Posted by Darth Cheney
    I guess what I'm really trying to figure out here is, what actually convinced people to "sign on the dotted line" so to speak, for the first time? Despite all of the hype that seems to fly around this board, there really do seem to be some reasonably thoughtful people here that are active in MLM.

    Is this kind of presentation all it took to win them over?
    I'm a Quixtar rep. So sorry to hear of your rather boring evening. He must have been fairly new, he couldn't figure out in 5 minutes that you weren't interested. LOL

    I like the products, that is what convinced me to get involved, I had sold some of them before when I was in Amway 20 years ago and made money at it without recruiting, it hasn't been that hard to repeat that process. I couldn't care less about recruiting that's a lot of extra work. Though I wouldn't do circles if I did want to recruit, I'm way too high tech oriented for that.

    It's not hard, just time consuming.


    Lady Mod

  5. #5
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    Re: My Experience with an MLM Rep

    Thanks for your response, soju. Sounds like it was a decision you pretty much made on your own, without much influence from the existing reps.

    I have to admit, I was a little surprised to learn you were involved in MLM. Just based on your post history, you don't seem like the type of person that would be easily swayed by one of these sales pitches.

    Its good to hear that you would at least try to be more straight with people if you did play the recruiting game, though. Best of luck to you.
    I'm not selling anything at the moment, but thanks for viewing my signature!

  6. #6
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    Re: My Experience with an MLM Rep

    Quote Originally Posted by Darth Cheney
    Thanks for your response, soju. Sounds like it was a decision you pretty much made on your own, without much influence from the existing reps.

    I have to admit, I was a little surprised to learn you were involved in MLM. Just based on your post history, you don't seem like the type of person that would be easily swayed by one of these sales pitches.
    Why would that surprise you? We are surrounded every day by sales pitches of one sort or another on television, by salespeople, on the radio, in the store both subtle and blatant in your face and every day people make the decision not to be swayed by that pitch or to be sold on that one. There's no one pitch that is better than another. It's called advertising and we can choose which one's to heed and which ones to believe all day long. There is no difference in what it is, only in the approach. If you can't resist an MLM sales pitch without getting all the facts and the products, then check out of life, you are doomed. You probably can't resist infomercials and store displays either. :rolleyes: :D

    Its good to hear that you would at least try to be more straight with people if you did play the recruiting game, though. Best of luck to you.
    It's easier to tell the truth than to fabricate a lie. And you will find here that the People who cry they have been scammed aren't any more honest or straight with people than those who paint easy income pictures via their business plans. It's all going to depend on which sales pitch you'd rather believe. ;)


    Namaskar,

    Lady Mod

  7. #7
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    Re: My Experience with an MLM Rep

    Quote Originally Posted by sojustask
    Why would that surprise you? We are surrounded every day by sales pitches of one sort or another on television, by salespeople, on the radio, in the store both subtle and blatant in your face and every day people make the decision not to be swayed by that pitch or to be sold on that one. There's no one pitch that is better than another.
    Yes, I understand that and agree to a certain extent. I merely meant that, in my own personal experience, those who are swayed by the MLM pitch tend to be the somewhat naive, starry eyed dreamers who believe that the path to wealth will be an easy one. Why else would these pitches so often involve the images of huge mansions, luxury cars, yachts..etc? They're selling the dream.

    Just by reading your previous posts, you did not strike me as the sort of person that would buy into that sort of thing. That's all I was saying, really. No insult was intended.


    Quote Originally Posted by sojustask
    You probably can't resist infomercials and store displays either.
    How could anyone resist those? Have you seen that new Ronco Showtime Rotisserie?? I mean, it cooks a whole chicken in less than an hour! And what about the miracle of Billy Mays and his Oxiclean stain remover? It cuts straight through the grease! Unbelievable! Where's my credit card? :)


    Quote Originally Posted by sojustask
    It's easier to tell the truth than to fabricate a lie. And you will find here that the People who cry they have been scammed aren't any more honest or straight with people than those who paint easy income pictures via their business plans. It's all going to depend on which sales pitch you'd rather believe.
    I do think you have a point, in that people sometimes tend to "pile on" with their criticisms without much real investigation, even when those criticisms are ultimately justified. But, this being an anti-scam site, I personally believe that skepticism should be the rule rather than the exception. I'd rather this site not turn into one giant ad for MLM( although I do love buying so much).

    I had a few other points I wanted to make, but I just found out QVC is having it's "today's special value" on a new big screen TV, so I gotta go. Where did I leave that checkbook....
    I'm not selling anything at the moment, but thanks for viewing my signature!

  8. #8
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    Re: My Experience with an MLM Rep

    Quote Originally Posted by Darth Cheney
    Yes, I understand that and agree to a certain extent. I merely meant that, in my own personal experience, those who are swayed by the MLM pitch tend to be the somewhat naive, starry eyed dreamers who believe that the path to wealth will be an easy one. Why else would these pitches so often involve the images of huge mansions, luxury cars, yachts..etc? They're selling the dream.
    They also believe that if they show up to work they have earned their pay. What they don't realize is that they are not paid to work, they are paid by the value they bring to their work. Lazy people tend to be low earners or get laid off. They are expendable.

    Those images are testimonials. Someone's dream that became a reality because of MLM. You look at it as something evil. It's not more evil than muscle car or luxury car commercials with sexy women dressed to the nine's showing off their features. Does anyone really believe that the car suddenly makes them "Babe magnets?" It's surprising how many men have fallen for that line and how many women seeing a man drive one just assume the guy must be loaded and a player. ;)

    Just by reading your previous posts, you did not strike me as the sort of person that would buy into that sort of thing. That's all I was saying, really. No insult was intended.
    Darlin' I didn't "buy into" anything except good products that I was already familiar with, an affiliate site that I can shop from and get paid a commission on my purchases (since most of my shopping involves the Internet anyway it was a perfect match) and a means to earn some money on the side and the ability to share the same deal with others. ;)

    How could anyone resist those? Have you seen that new Ronco Showtime Rotisserie?? I mean, it cooks a whole chicken in less than an hour! And what about the miracle of Billy Mays and his Oxiclean stain remover? It cuts straight through the grease! Unbelievable! Where's my credit card? :)
    Yes I have, LOL. I find them to be great entertainment.

    I do think you have a point, in that people sometimes tend to "pile on" with their criticisms without much real investigation, even when those criticisms are ultimately justified. But, this being an anti-scam site, I personally believe that skepticism should be the rule rather than the exception. I'd rather this site not turn into one giant ad for MLM( although I do love buying so much).
    I've been moderating here for two years, I don't wish to change the site. I would like to see more honesty from both sides but the minute you are honest around here it seems to be the "kiss of death". So the site is more entertaining than informative with the exception of a few regulars on both sides.

    I had a few other points I wanted to make, but I just found out QVC is having it's "today's special value" on a new big screen TV, so I gotta go. Where did I leave that checkbook....
    Oh QVC. It's been years since I got something from them. One of the best digital cameras I ever had I got from them 8 years ago. It's been that long since I've watched that station. Maybe I should take a stroll down memory.

    Lady Mod

  9. #9
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    Re: My Experience with an MLM Rep

    Quote Originally Posted by sojustask
    They also believe that if they show up to work they have earned their pay. What they don't realize is that they are not paid to work, they are paid by the value they bring to their work. Lazy people tend to be low earners or get laid off. They are expendable.
    That's a bit of a generalization. There are lazy people at all levels of employment, including top executives at corporations who are compensated tremendously well, but do not always add a lot of value to their company. You might make the same argument for the guys who start up these MLMs. They really do not have to add any value to the company once their down line network has been established. They merely sit back and watch the little guy do all the work. Much like the aforementioned executives.

    Quote Originally Posted by sojustask
    Those images are testimonials. Someone's dream that became a reality because of MLM.
    It's the MLM business model that allows for much of that sort of hype. Overzealous, independent reps go forth into the marketplace and make all sorts of unfounded and incredible claims in order to sign people up. It's certainly not the only industry that's guilty of it, but definitely one of the biggest offenders, IMO.

    Quote Originally Posted by sojustask
    Does anyone really believe that the car suddenly makes them "Babe magnets?" It's surprising how many men have fallen for that line and how many women seeing a man drive one just assume the guy must be loaded and a player. ;)
    Wait a minute....are you suggesting that my new car does not make me a babe magnet?? That's not what the guy at the dealership said. He promised me that the women would be all over me in this! What am I supposed to do with this thing now? :(

    And, lastly, I would never argue that "sexy women showing off their features" is evil. :)
    I'm not selling anything at the moment, but thanks for viewing my signature!

  10. #10
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    Re: My Experience with an MLM Rep

    Quote Originally Posted by Darth Cheney
    That's a bit of a generalization. There are lazy people at all levels of employment, including top executives at corporations who are compensated tremendously well, but do not always add a lot of value to their company. You might make the same argument for the guys who start up these MLMs. They really do not have to add any value to the company once their down line network has been established. They merely sit back and watch the little guy do all the work. Much like the aforementioned executives.
    And the MLMers get bashed and called scammers but the aformentioned executives do not. Rather ironic isn't it?

    It's the MLM business model that allows for much of that sort of hype. Overzealous, independent reps go forth into the marketplace and make all sorts of unfounded and incredible claims in order to sign people up. It's certainly not the only industry that's guilty of it, but definitely one of the biggest offenders, IMO.

    I can agree with that. There needs to be more honesty in the MLM industry about products and income claims. But as of yet, we can't regulate what an individual says. And those big rallies are geared to showing what was already done by someone else. Can anyone else achieve it? Absolutely. Give anyone 10 -20 years in their particular MLM business and they can be making millions of dollars a year too. But not in a few months or even a few years in most cases.

    If you lead with product you don't need to make big income claims. My upline teases me, he said I am awfully picky about who I want to work with. LOL. I guess so, if it's my business I should have some say in who I partner with. This stemmed from someone requesting information about a product and the business that clicked on one of my links below, from this site. This site is the only place I advertise those particular websites. In my emails I use the site in my profile. It's not as product exclusive, more general. Well, I called the number the person gave me and got voicemail and I've sent an email in response. He thought I should send the overview, I told him I haven't determined if the person is really looking or is just kicking tires. LOL. I don't waste my energy with the tire kickers. I should have to convince anyone to join me in my business if they are seriously looking. That is what we are taught. I'm not desparate to build a downline. I only want to work with people who really want to build a business in affiliate marketing or MLM. Then I'll be serious about helping them achieve their business goals. I haven't been in an MLM that didn't teach that so it boggles my mind why reps deviate from it so badly.


    Wait a minute....are you suggesting that my new car does not make me a babe magnet?? That's not what the guy at the dealership said. He promised me that the women would be all over me in this! What am I supposed to do with this thing now? :(
    Drive it. I hope it gets decent gas mileage. LOL.

    And, lastly, I would never argue that "sexy women showing off their features" is evil. :)
    Apparently not, you fell for it right? ;)

    Lady Mod

  11. #11
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    Re: My Experience with an MLM Rep

    Quote Originally Posted by sojustask
    And the MLMers get bashed and called scammers but the aformentioned executives do not. Rather ironic isn't it?
    Not really. MLMers get called scammers because people perceive them to be running dishonest businesses that are attempting to scam people. Traditional businesses are not viewed that way because people are much less likely to feel ripped off by them. And it's generally the fault of the MLM reps themselves that the business is seen in such a bad light to begin with.


    Quote Originally Posted by sojustask
    I can agree with that. There needs to be more honesty in the MLM industry about products and income claims.
    I knew it....you're finally starting to come around to my side. It was inevitable, really. Walk toward the light, sojustask. You're almost there, just a few more steps....:)

    Quote Originally Posted by sojustask
    If you lead with product you don't need to make big income claims. My upline teases me, he said I am awfully picky about who I want to work with.
    Your upline sounds more like the type of MLM rep I'm used to. The kind that would take an allowance away from a child if it meant generating another sale.

    If you really are hesitant to go out there and actively recruit others, then you are definitely a rarity in the industry. Even "tire kickers" are enough to get most MLMers pretty worked up.
    I'm not selling anything at the moment, but thanks for viewing my signature!

  12. #12
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    Re: My Experience with an MLM Rep

    Darth Cheney I'll tell one of the problems I have with MLM

    It's not just people spouting false claims of earning potential. A very big problem in multi level marketing is loss of good relationships.

    Poeple start to take advantage of there friends and family by pestering them to buy products or join a downline. A problem you'll hear often is people getting a call from an old friend they haven't seen for a long time asking them if they would like to meet up for a coffee. They are pleased to see their old buddy after such a long time but are very disapointed when they find out they where only contacted because the friend wanted to tell them about a great "business opertunity".

    This practise was banned in China becasue of this very reason. It began to get very out of control. Communities throughout the US have suffered because of it and there have even been claims of church goers having to listen to the local priest telling his followers what a wonderfull opertuntiy he has for them.

    So although people tent to concentrate on the financial loss people go through with these schemes, I don't think they really lose that much money. What I really dislike about these companies is the reason I gave above. If a person is willing to speak to a total stranger reading a business magazine, you can be sure he's already exuasted his resorses that are friends and family, who knows? maybe he would never push a scheme like that on his own family, he just waits for the next mug to come along.
    Last edited by Steady; 05-23-2007 at 12:43 PM.
    THIS USERS ACCOUNT IS NOW CLOSED

  13. #13
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    Re: My Experience with an MLM Rep

    Quote Originally Posted by Darth Cheney
    Not really. MLMers get called scammers because people perceive them to be running dishonest businesses that are attempting to scam people. Traditional businesses are not viewed that way because people are much less likely to feel ripped off by them. And it's generally the fault of the MLM reps themselves that the business is seen in such a bad light to begin with.
    Actually, I'm not so sure that is accurate. I think that people who get ripped off by traditional businesses just stop doing business with them. They may talk to a few friends and stuff but they don't get on forums and go balistic.

    MLM is so much on the Internet and recruiting is done over it for the most part as well as having forums, blogs and websites being much easier to have these days, it was inevitable that you would hear more about it than a traditional business.

    I knew it....you're finally starting to come around to my side. It was inevitable, really. Walk toward the light, sojustask. You're almost there, just a few more steps....:)
    Coming around? I've been there for the last 10 years when I first got on the Internet and started making an income from it. I saw how many liars there were and determined that I would always be the voice of honesty and reason.
    I have never strayed from that.

    Your upline sounds more like the type of MLM rep I'm used to. The kind that would take an allowance away from a child if it meant generating another sale.
    LOL, no, he's not quite that bad. He's new. He just didn't realize that even with the Internet I want to make sure that the person who is interested is someone who I am going to want to work with. I'll be the one doing the training after all.

    If you really are hesitant to go out there and actively recruit others, then you are definitely a rarity in the industry. Even "tire kickers" are enough to get most MLMers pretty worked up.
    I've had downlines. I've conducted training calls for several companies showing 30 -50 people at a time how to get over their fear of cold calling on the phone. I used to call out of the phone book to prove a point. But I don't like wasting my time with people who aren't really looking. They are not going to say yes and if they happen to, they aren't going to really do anything because they got in simply because I was a good convincer, not because they were wanting a business.

    It's only logical to work with those who are genuinely concerned with having a business.

    Lady Mod

  14. #14
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    Re: My Experience with an MLM Rep

    Hey you know what sojustask I think I'm starting to see where everybody gets there wires crossed with you.

    You often say that the multi level marketing is a business that requires hard work and dedication. Even then you may not earn enough money to leave your job but maybe cut down on the hours. You even tell us that you dont push people into it if you feel they aren't getting into it for the right reasons.

    I wouldn't argue with any of the above because I think its all true. Unfortunatly you seem to be a very small minority that practice such integrity. Maybe many years ago the majority of people that where in this business thought like you but those times have all but disappeared. The MLM system is now being used to give false hope, use peoples relationships, inspire greed and get allot of money as quickly as possible.

    When I say I hate the MLM system I'm not talking about the small minority that use it to get a little money on the side. I'm talking about the large minority that have been programmed by exaggerated seminars to get out there and SIGN PEOPLE UP.

    This is glaringly obvious when you look at most MLM companies.
    THIS USERS ACCOUNT IS NOW CLOSED

  15. #15
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    Re: My Experience with an MLM Rep

    Quote Originally Posted by Steady
    Hey you know what sojustask I think I'm starting to see where everybody gets there wires crossed with you.

    You often say that the multi level marketing is a business that requires hard work and dedication. Even then you may not earn enough money to leave your job but maybe cut down on the hours. You even tell us that you dont push people into it if you feel they aren't getting into it for the right reasons.

    I wouldn't argue with any of the above because I think its all true. Unfortunatly you seem to be a very small minority that practice such integrity. Maybe many years ago the majority of people that where in this business thought like you but those times have all but disappeared. The MLM system is now being used to give false hope, use peoples relationships, inspire greed and get allot of money as quickly as possible.

    When I say I hate the MLM system I'm not talking about the small minority that use it to get a little money on the side. I'm talking about the large minority that have been programmed by exaggerated seminars to get out there and SIGN PEOPLE UP.

    This is glaringly obvious when you look at most MLM companies.
    Well thank you. :o

    I think Steady we do see the same way on several levels. We just do not agree I think, with the solution. I think the solution is two fold.

    First people need to take some responsibility for their own behavior. Both as a seller and as a buyer. When did we become such a brainless, gullible society? I'm just floored by it, quite frankly. I think it started happening with the onset of credit cards. I'm talking generally here. Easy money, small payments, and if it didn't work out, stop paying them or declare bankruptcy. LOL, come to think of it, our own politicians run the government that way, it's not a long stretch to understand why the average citizen does as well. :eek:

    So first off, we have to educate consumers how to be responsible for their purchasing decisions. Whether that purchase is a product, service or in the case of MLM, a business venture. Budgets and sticking to them works wonders in this area.

    Set a financial budget, how much can you spend each month on product?
    How much can you afford to spend on business expenses? These need to be planned for and written down.
    I.E.
    Phone/long distance
    Gas/travel
    Hotels/ if you must go overnight
    Meals/if eating out
    samples, literature, personal educational materials.


    Set a time budget, how much time will you realistically devote to your business? You can burn through family and friends in an hour and then what? Seriously now, how much time will you put into these activities every day?

    Cold calling
    Emailing
    Training meetings or calls (yours or companies, upline)
    Reading
    Listening to motivational stuff.
    Meeting with prospects if applicable

    Set a time frame and stick with it.

    ************************************

    When you get realistic and honest about it, you can see, you are going to be spending some time and money to build your business. IF you aren't going to be consistent in any of these areas, DON'T get into a business. You need more personal development first.

    Secondly, set a goal. 30 days, 60 days, 90 days, 6 months, a Year.

    I'm not talking financial here necessarily. Let the financial goals take care of themselves, they are a direct result of your activity goals. If you do the activities involved to build a business, the financial goals will eventually be met. They teach this stuff in Business 101. It works for any kind of business, but is especially helpful in an MLM environment.

    Third, Make sure whatever business you involve yourself in isn't emphasizing, ground floor, state of art, limited time, whatever. All opportunities say the same thing. ALL of them. So, gear your questions and inquiries and research to the products. These are ultimately what you represent. These are what you are going to be basing your best testimony on. And look, if it's a good product you don't need to exaggerate about it. I go to Alternative practitioners, I don't use regular doctors. I know more than enough about nutritionals and stuff. Vitamins will not grow limbs. Any good vitamin, regardless of the method of delivery will assist the body to heal itself if all other aspects are being addressed as well, such as exercise, getting detoxed, eating non processed foods, getting enough sleep. I eliminated cancer from my system 6 years ago with a change in diet, exercise and rest and using vitamins (not even sold by an MLM company) so I know first hand what it can mean.

    So educate, YES. But don't hype. It's not necessary and destroys your credibility.

    It is up to the consumer to change the attitudes of the industry. The consumer has the most leverage to do that. So don't fall for the Income hype, DEMAND that you become convinced a different way. If you want to see changes in the industry, you have to change first.

    NOW, that brings me to the MLM industry as a whole.

    Don't blame it on the company. It's rather pointless.

    New Reps, do yourself a favor. If you met all the criteria I outlined above, then YOU make sure not to fall in the trap of using someone else's hype to build your business. You want to be around 10, 20 years from now. In fact, you want the company you represent to be around to keep supplying you and your customers and downlines with product, so it's up to you, the NEW Rep to make sure that above everything else, that you present yourself and your business opportunity honestly and ethically.

    And frankly, it's up to all of us MLM reps these days to turn the trend and bad press around. And we can ONLY do that by refusing to fall into the traps already established to build our businesses.

    It's great to be enthusiastic, to build a downline, to want it all and talk about it. But what kind of foundation are you building your business on? What are you using that you can recommend. What steps are you doing every day to establish your business and it's credibility.

    Everyone holds that first glow for the first 30 days or so. I call that the "Honeymoon" period. But how long do you plan to build? Follow the steps above and you'll be in at least a year. If you follow the time budget you established for the first year, you shouldn't have any problems remaining in your business for many years. But don't consider that 3 months is a good trial. I hope you did your homework better than that. In 3 months you have barely established a habit. Be serious, give yourself at least a year, and look for people who will be serious about that too.

    Those budget items I mentioned above. They are one of the first things I want to know from a potential partner. I want them to be real with themselves. I'm looking for a few good people, not masses of drop-outs. What are you looking for in your business?

    When you start slowing your roll, becoming credible and honest with others, the industry will start looking credible and honest. It's up to us to overcome the bad reputation it's gotten and establish a better one in it's place.

    ************************************************** *****
    I hope I made a point here. I'm being constantly interupted this morning so LOL, I lose my train of thought.

    Namaste'

    Lady Mod

  16. #16
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    Re: My Experience with an MLM Rep

    Quote Originally Posted by Steady

    When I say I hate the MLM system I'm not talking about the small minority that use it to get a little money on the side. I'm talking about the large minority that have been programmed by exaggerated seminars to get out there and SIGN PEOPLE UP.
    I do understand, have always understood what you mean. But you do generalize which does get ethical MLMers trying to change the way the industry operates irked as well as sidetracked trying to defend themselves.

    In a way, you contribute to keeping the minority a minority by using so many generalities. Not just you, but a lot of naysayers and skeptics.

    If you could perhaps be more specific and honest that not everyone operates in the manner that most do, and give a little support to the minority, you might be instrumental in helping us turn things around. ;)
    Praise what is being done right and you will find more people will start doing the right thing. Praise is much more powerful in the long run than criticism.


    Namaste'

    Lady Mod

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