+ Reply to Thread
Results 1 to 5 of 5

  1. #1
    sojustask's Avatar
    sojustask is offline The Late, Great Lady Mod - Retired User Rank
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Posts
    12,866

    Nicrosoft -Windows Vista's Nasty Surprises

    Windows Vista's Nasty Surprises


    http://www.playfuls.com/news_06076_W...Surprises.html


    Windows Vista is out. And by now, almost everyone knows three things about Microsoft's first major operating system release in five years: it has enhanced security features, a snazzy interface, and better search capabilities.

    But there's more to Vista than these three features - and the news is not all good. While some of Vista's secrets are bound to surprise you pleasantly, others could make you question your decision to upgrade altogether.

    --- Registration lockdown

    With Vista, Microsoft has gotten stricter than ever on acceptable use of its software. The company's Genuine Software Initiative has been picking up steam over the past year, forcing users to "validate" their version of Windows when a critical patch or desirable new feature is made available over the Internet. If, through this check, the software is deemed invalid, access to the download is denied. Complaints from paying customers of Microsoft's software are not rare under this system.

    But with Vista, Microsoft has taken the Genuine Software Initiative to a new level. If you fail to "activate" - or register - your version of Vista with Microsoft within 30 days, the operating system goes into a "reduced functionality mode," which essentially cripples the operating system.

    Once in reduced functionality mode, you'll be able to log on to Vista for only one hour. After that, Vista will force a system shutdown. Even during the hour you're logged on, Vista will disable the Aero interface and several other key features that make Vista what it is. About the only thing you'll be able to do is activate the product using one of the acceptable methods.

    When Microsoft tried a similar scheme in the early days of Windows XP, there were so many complaints from legitimate users who were blacklisted that Microsoft published a workaround. Unless the program has been significantly improved, a number of users may again find themselves blacklisted - and this time, the complaints will be louder, since reduced functionality mode renders your PC virtually useless.

    --- User accounts

    Part of Vista's emphasis on security alters the way users of a PC are handled. Vista's new User Account Control (UAC) is at the heart of these security enhancements, and it's a feature that's bound to cause frustrations for a large number of people.

    Here's why. By default, Vista monitors a user's actions and throws up a dialog box requiring administrator credentials before allowing any action that has a potential impact on system security.

    UAC is designed to prevent malicious software from infiltrating your PC, and it goes some way toward achieving that goal. The downside, however, is that most users will have to deal with annoying dialog boxes whenever they run a program that requires access to sensitive locations. Many beta testers of Vista complained that UAC prompts showed up even when performing seemingly harmless activities.

    To avoid such annoyances, Vista owners will have to become thoroughly familiar with the concept of UAC and configure their user account appropriately - no lightweight task.

    --- Performance

    Windows Vista requires more computing horsepower than any previous version of Windows. While that's not necessarily surprising, what may be is that Vista's visually impressive Aero interface won't even be available to you if your computer does not contain a dedicated graphics card. Roughly half of today's computers will need to be upgraded to run Vista adequately, according to U.S.-based Jon Peddie Research.

    Notebook users will be especially hard hit by Vista's hardware requirements. That's because many lower-cost notebooks over the past couple of years were sold with low-cost integrated graphics controllers that work fine when displaying the standard business applications and Web pages in Windows XP. But for Vista, these machines will be inadequate.

    Even worse, notebook users with integrated graphics won't be able to upgrade their machines just by purchasing a new video card. Most notebook computers would require an entire motherboard upgrade to work effectively with Vista. In other words, it will make more sense to buy a completely new machine.

    Those who do have a dedicated graphics card with at least 64 megabytes of memory will have make sure their systems meet the other unspoken requirement of Vista: at least 1 gigabyte (GB) of system memory. Anything less will have you tapping your fingers far too often - or reducing the number of tasks you can undertake simultaneously.

    By Jay Dougherty, Dpa

    .

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Posts
    127

    Re: Nicrosoft -Windows Vista's Nasty Surprises

    It reminds me about Windows Millenium. Just a huge advertising campaign for something that wasn't worth to upgrade at that time.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Posts
    369

    Re: Nicrosoft -Windows Vista's Nasty Surprises

    not surprisingly, the vista release has been a disaster. most industry analysts expected as such...

    i was talking to the IT guy here at the company that i work at.... and he was talking about what a disaster this thing is..... he was saying that most "experts" (whatever that means) have concluded that this thing was released too early..... my IT guy says that the OS was probably about 2 years away from being at a level that is considered highly functional. i guess MS was overzealous in announcing a release date years ago (vista was supposed to be released 2 years ago)...

    anyways... i am staying away from it for a couple of years anyway.... i am lobbying for Macs where i work...

    most of what vista has upgraded to has been available on Macs for years anyway. Macs are a bit more expensive than PCs, so i doubt that the company will switch over, but you know what they say.... you get what you pay for!

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Posts
    5

    Re: Nicrosoft -Windows Vista's Nasty Surprises

    Quote Originally Posted by sojustask
    Windows Vista's Nasty Surprises


    http://www.playfuls.com/news_06076_W...Surprises.html


    Windows Vista is out. And by now, almost everyone knows three things about Microsoft's first major operating system release in five years: it has enhanced security features, a snazzy interface, and better search capabilities.

    But there's more to Vista than these three features - and the news is not all good. While some of Vista's secrets are bound to surprise you pleasantly, others could make you question your decision to upgrade altogether.

    --- Registration lockdown

    With Vista, Microsoft has gotten stricter than ever on acceptable use of its software. The company's Genuine Software Initiative has been picking up steam over the past year, forcing users to "validate" their version of Windows when a critical patch or desirable new feature is made available over the Internet. If, through this check, the software is deemed invalid, access to the download is denied. Complaints from paying customers of Microsoft's software are not rare under this system.

    But with Vista, Microsoft has taken the Genuine Software Initiative to a new level. If you fail to "activate" - or register - your version of Vista with Microsoft within 30 days, the operating system goes into a "reduced functionality mode," which essentially cripples the operating system.

    Once in reduced functionality mode, you'll be able to log on to Vista for only one hour. After that, Vista will force a system shutdown. Even during the hour you're logged on, Vista will disable the Aero interface and several other key features that make Vista what it is. About the only thing you'll be able to do is activate the product using one of the acceptable methods.

    When Microsoft tried a similar scheme in the early days of Windows XP, there were so many complaints from legitimate users who were blacklisted that Microsoft published a workaround. Unless the program has been significantly improved, a number of users may again find themselves blacklisted - and this time, the complaints will be louder, since reduced functionality mode renders your PC virtually useless.

    --- User accounts

    Part of Vista's emphasis on security alters the way users of a PC are handled. Vista's new User Account Control (UAC) is at the heart of these security enhancements, and it's a feature that's bound to cause frustrations for a large number of people.

    Here's why. By default, Vista monitors a user's actions and throws up a dialog box requiring administrator credentials before allowing any action that has a potential impact on system security.

    UAC is designed to prevent malicious software from infiltrating your PC, and it goes some way toward achieving that goal. The downside, however, is that most users will have to deal with annoying dialog boxes whenever they run a program that requires access to sensitive locations. Many beta testers of Vista complained that UAC prompts showed up even when performing seemingly harmless activities.

    To avoid such annoyances, Vista owners will have to become thoroughly familiar with the concept of UAC and configure their user account appropriately - no lightweight task.

    --- Performance

    Windows Vista requires more computing horsepower than any previous version of Windows. While that's not necessarily surprising, what may be is that Vista's visually impressive Aero interface won't even be available to you if your computer does not contain a dedicated graphics card. Roughly half of today's computers will need to be upgraded to run Vista adequately, according to U.S.-based Jon Peddie Research.

    Notebook users will be especially hard hit by Vista's hardware requirements. That's because many lower-cost notebooks over the past couple of years were sold with low-cost integrated graphics controllers that work fine when displaying the standard business applications and Web pages in Windows XP. But for Vista, these machines will be inadequate.

    Even worse, notebook users with integrated graphics won't be able to upgrade their machines just by purchasing a new video card. Most notebook computers would require an entire motherboard upgrade to work effectively with Vista. In other words, it will make more sense to buy a completely new machine.

    Those who do have a dedicated graphics card with at least 64 megabytes of memory will have make sure their systems meet the other unspoken requirement of Vista: at least 1 gigabyte (GB) of system memory. Anything less will have you tapping your fingers far too often - or reducing the number of tasks you can undertake simultaneously.

    By Jay Dougherty, Dpa

    .

    I really hate to break it to you, but this is nothing but biased propaganda.
    1) Your first issue is really no different than windows XP. It's MS's way of protecting itself and requiring the same activation that everyone has been doing already.
    2) This is very easy to turn off. Doing a simple search for UAC will give you instructions on doing it. There is a legitimate reason for this access control however. It does lock the system down, and makes the user aware of when a program is using administrator rights. This (in theory anyway) should greatly reduce viruses and spyware. Or at the very least it will make the user aware of such programs attempting to run on their system.
    3) You don't need a dedicated video card to run aero. As long as you have the required about of system memory it'll run fine. That aside you don't even need to have aero running in order to be able to use Vista. In fact, most of the functionality of aero is nothing but eye candy and pointless anyway.

    That being said, vista does have some issues, as does most new software of this magnitude. I'm not a fan of microsoft as a company. It just disturbs me when people spew worthless garbage and others eat it up as gospel without knowing any better.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Posts
    3

    Re: Nicrosoft -Windows Vista's Nasty Surprises

    TRASH from the biggest thief in the world!

    Thank God I'm free of windows trash, I use what 'intelligent' governments and individuals are going to: Linux.

    What about that the stuoid idiotic vista not being able to interface with Quickbooks.

    What do those mickey-mouse programmers smoke?

Similar Threads

  1. "Windows Repair" Virus- BEWARE Its Nasty
    By Ian58654 in forum Mail Order Scams
    Replies: 5
    Last Post: 04-01-2011, 07:23 PM
  2. AP Fact Checks Award-Winning Liar: No Surprises
    By pwrone in forum Political Scams
    Replies: 6
    Last Post: 02-01-2010, 07:37 PM
  3. Vista Print! Is it a scam?
    By AXJ in forum Mail Order Scams
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: 07-13-2008, 03:04 PM
  4. NERD FIGHT! Global Warming Debate Gets Nasty
    By yossarian in forum Science Scams
    Replies: 34
    Last Post: 07-29-2007, 01:17 PM
  5. Vista Soft LABS on careerbuilder.com
    By flovering@charter.net in forum Corporate Scams
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 01-03-2007, 02:32 AM

Tags for this Thread

Bookmarks

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may post new threads
  • You may post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may edit your posts
  •