+ Reply to Thread
Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 16 of 22

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Posts
    3

    Why don't more people complain publicly?

    In my twenty-some years experience as a sales consultant with various corporations, I've seen some pretty shady tactics used to increase sales at the expense of consumers. It's happening more and more, it's getting worse and worse as public companies compete in the stock market, and it's got me so disillusioned at this point I have to release it ... or I'll release it in my workplace and lose my career. Obviously, I don't want to lose my source of income or blacklist myself out of ever working again. What I want to see is reform so I can feel good about the work I do again. Sales.

    Why don't more people complain publicly about the increased rates they're paying along with the reduced customer service they're receiving? I'm talking about complaining to the media. If more people do this, it might encourage law reform to prevent average, every-day North Americans from being screwed over again and again by corporate money-grubbers.

    There is a section on this site dedicated to MLM / Pyramid Scams and how shady they are in their dealings with staff and customers. They don't give all the information upfront, yadda, yadda, yadda. The funny thing is, neither do most so-called "reputable" corporations. Some of their tactics can be as shady as an MLM.

    I'm going to post a couple of examples here without listing the names of the companies. I encourage discussion about these examples. I also encourage anyone, as a consumer or client who has experienced this kind of treatment, to report it to the media. Lawyers are too expensive for most people and you won't get too far in a David vs. Goliath lawsuit anyway. So the media is the next best thing. Let's stop the shady tactics here and now.

    Example 1:

    You receive a "complimentary newspaper" on your doorstep with a letter attached that says you will receive it for free for two weeks. If, after two weeks, you no longer want the subscription, it's up to you to call the newspaper to cancel, otherwise you will begin being billed.

    If this is you, and you have bill-collectors calling you because you received this promotional subscription you didn't ask for, and you forgot to cancel it, call the media. Chances are you're not the only one this happened to. Help others by making them aware that, as a consumer, you are not in the wrong. A company cannot legally charge you for something you didn't ask for in the first place.

    Example 2:

    You are asked to prepay the full year for an advertisement in your local directory. You agree to these conditions and pay for twelve months upfront, for the shelf-life of that directory: May through next April. Unfortunately, the following March, you receive a bill in the mail stating the company won't be distributing the newest directory until next June, so you are responsible for an additional 2 months of advertising you weren’t counting on, simply because the old directory will stay on the streets for 2 months longer than originally intended. The company representative insists you must pay and threatens to send you to collections if you don’t.

    If this is you, and you have bill collectors calling you because the company has tried to get another 2 months of payment out of you due to their own negligence at getting their next directory out on time, call the media. This is extortion and, chances are, you're not the only one this has happened to. Help others by making them aware that this is wrong, and they are not liable to pay for these extra 2 months.

    Example 3:

    You bought a new cell phone program based on a promotion where you were told you had unlimited evening and weekend minutes with two people of your choice. Six months into the program, you receive a bill for $1000 and you can't believe your eyes! You call the store where you bought the program to question the bill, and they tell you that the unlimited minutes were only a temporary promotion for the first three months. They tell you it was a part of the contract. What contract, you ask? You didn’t sign anything, nor were you given a copy of this contract to take home with you. You go down to the store to view this so-called contract, but they don't have a copy either. Regardless, they say their hands are tied and you must pay the bill.

    If this is you, and you have a huge cell phone bill you were not expecting, and you have no recollection of anyone telling you it was a temporary promotion, and there is no signed contract to be found, call the media. Chances are, you're not the only one this has happened to. Help others by making them aware of this shady business practice. Make corporations accountable to giving you all the information upfront and making sure you fully understand the program you’re buying into ahead of time. That is their responsibility.

    I have no doubt there are many, many other examples of shady corporate tactics that can be added to my list. Please post them as a reference for consumers so these people can hold them accountable in public once and for all. It's the only way to make change.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Posts
    55

    Re: Why don't more people complain publicly?

    In addition to calling the media, call your local consumer and coprporate affairs office. Some of those tactics may be illegal where you are. This wouldn't require a lawsuit, since the company would have no legal right to demand payment and could be shut down if they keep trying to get it.

    A similar event to the newspaper thing happened with a local cable company in my hometown. They were going to set up a new set of premium channels, and anyone who didn't want them had to phone in to tell them not to include them on next month's package, or they would be billed.

    The practice was called negative billing and it was illegal, so the cable company lost quite a bit of money when they were told that legally they had no right to bill anyone who had not specifically asked to receive the premium service. Anyone they just sent it to got a free trial.

    I imagine the directory scheme and the cell phone scheme are also illegal and that neither company would have any legal right to bill anyone under those circumstances in most jurisdictions. When you think you have been scammed it's usually best to find out what your legal rights are and then go to the media.

    Colin Neilson

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Posts
    3

    Re: Why don't more people complain publicly?

    Quote Originally Posted by cneilson
    A similar event to the newspaper thing happened with a local cable company in my hometown. They were going to set up a new set of premium channels, and anyone who didn't want them had to phone in to tell them not to include them on next month's package, or they would be billed.
    I knew it. I knew if I posted on here, someone else would confirm this sort of thing is happening all over the place, all the time. Why don't more people go to the media with these types of things? I think it's because most people trust that the so-called reputable corporations would never think to do anything illegal. Also, most people simply aren't aware of their rights.

    I want to change that and stop these kinds of things from happening once and for all. I'm one of the front-line men at my corporation who is supposed to feed this kind of bull**** and lies to my customers. This reflects negatively on me and I resent it. It's wrong of my company to expect me to do these kinds of things. They are putting me in a terrible position, making me choose between my livelihood and my ethics. I'm sure there are other employees out there who feel the same way I do. Enough is enough.

    Quote Originally Posted by cneilson
    The practice was called negative billing and it was illegal, so the cable company lost quite a bit of money when they were told that legally they had no right to bill anyone who had not specifically asked to receive the premium service. Anyone they just sent it to got a free trial.
    You see? Look what happens when even one customer comes forward and complains. The company is forced not only to pay that individual back, but also everyone else they tried to extort money from.

    One customer can make a difference and help so many other people.

    Quote Originally Posted by cneilson
    When you think you have been scammed it's usually best to find out what your legal rights are and then go to the media.
    Also, your local media may have a consumer advocate on staff who can research this type of thing for you, to save you in legal fees. It might be worth asking.
    :)

  4. #4
    Rusted's Avatar
    Rusted is offline Gold Scams Member User Rank
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Posts
    645

    Re: Why don't more people complain publicly?

    These tend to backfire after awhile. A customer that gets shabby treatment has many friends.

    I myself had no hesitation about sending customers to the competition if they had what we didn't. I knew the customer would go there anyway, and would at least be inclined in the future to get something we had.

    Go with the ethics. Pays off in the long run.

    Bad karma does exist.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Posts
    127

    Re: Why don't more people complain publicly?

    I believe people complain and try to involve the media. The problem is that the media is afraid of being sued by big corporations.
    Another reason is that corporations also put a lot of money in adds. They are afraid to loose the bucks they make by advertising big (and sometimes bad) corporations.

    My favourite example of a bad corporation is EXPEDIA (since they tried to scam me using dirty tricks).
    A simple search in Google about EXPEDIA complaints will give you hundreds of awful stories.
    But if you make the same search in "Google News" you will find none.
    Sometimes, some negative reports about big companies are released but they dissapear soon.


    Is the media silencing stories from consumers? Is there a secret pact between the media and corporations? If the media a silent accomplice by doing nothing to help consumers the only solution is to post blogs trying to alert people.

  6. #6
    maran91 Guest

    Re: Why don't more people complain publicly?

    The media is corporations.

    Newspapers, tv stations, and radio stations are corporations - their job is to make money not to protect consumers.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Posts
    3

    Re: Why don't more people complain publicly?

    Quote Originally Posted by Doe3001
    Is the media silencing stories from consumers? Is there a secret pact between the media and corporations? If the media a silent accomplice by doing nothing to help consumers the only solution is to post blogs trying to alert people.
    Quote Originally Posted by maran91
    The media is corporations.
    Newspapers, tv stations, and radio stations are corporations - their job is to make money not to protect consumers.
    Valid point. If newspapers, TV stations (cable companies), directories, phone companies ... EVERYONE is doing it ... they're most likely going to look out for each other. A television station would look hypocritical if it reported a newspaper even though it's doing the exact same thing, and vice versa.

    Doe3001, I think you're right. Blogs like this one are probably the only way to make change. If people recognize any of the above scenarios, they should post here to invite others into a class action suit.

  8. #8

    Re: Why don't more people complain publicly?

    My name is Vincent Wan and I am the Vice President of Customer Service at Expedia. It has been brought to our attention about DOE3001 and the concerns he addressed about our company. We would like to apologize to him and the members of scam.com and are willing to offer him 2 free round trip tickets anywhere in the world plus a check for 500.00 dollars to show how much his business means to Expedia. We hope we can close this matter and help Expedia grow through our mistakes.

    Thank You
    Vincent Wan
    V.P Customer Service
    Expedia.com

  9. #9
    Rusted's Avatar
    Rusted is offline Gold Scams Member User Rank
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Posts
    645

    Re: Why don't more people complain publicly?

    Last poster just full of it.

    Word of mouth is what works. I have friends. I have a bad experience, I tell my friends. They tell their friends. Scam.com or whatever works.

    Also repeat customers, if any organization wants to last awhile, they need people to come back. What happens when they don't come back?

    Media, very ill-used word. Proper word is the press. True there are corporations but there are independents as well.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Posts
    127

    Re: Why don't more people complain publicly?

    Quote Originally Posted by C.S.Expedia
    My name is Vincent Wan and I am the Vice President of Customer Service at Expedia. It has been brought to our attention about DOE3001 and the concerns he addressed about our company. We would like to apologize to him and the members of scam.com and are willing to offer him 2 free round trip tickets anywhere in the world plus a check for 500.00 dollars to show how much his business means to Expedia. We hope we can close this matter and help Expedia grow through our mistakes.

    Thank You
    Vincent Wan
    V.P Customer Service
    Expedia.com
    Nice Joke but EXPEDIA has my personal e-mail address and phone number.
    Who are you? Someone else trying to "improve" EXPEDIA's reputation?
    What does it mean "close" this matter? I guess you want me to stop alerting people so EXPEDIA can freely cheat more customers?

  11. #11

    Re: Why don't more people complain publicly?

    I share the same view with you that so many companies especially people adpat shady tactics to increase their sales at the expense of consumers. Here's one true to life experience I'd like to share which I read in the Internet some years ago...

    BE CAREFUL of searching the Internet for your swimming goods, you just might be victimized by this swindler Malaysian national who is based in Hong Kong, like what happened to this certain company.

    DO NOT BUY your swimming pool equipments from RICHARD TEH a.k.a. TEH KOK LEONG, a HongKong based "employee" of Colorado Time Systems a US based company in Colorado USA.

    This is a scam/unfair business practice which happened to this victim company years ago and remains unresolved until to date, this victim company was constructing its pool and needed to purchase swimming pool equipments, while browsing the internet, it came across a US company named Colorado Time Systems (Swimming Equipments)

    This victim company sent a enquiry and got a reply from this US company to contact its HongKong branch office represented its by Mr. Richard Teh – VP Asia Pacific

    So this victim company sent its enquiry again but this time to this RICHARD TEH who is the Vice President for Asia Pacific of this US company. Since the victim company was in a hurry to get its pool ready, it requested for a personal meeting with this Richard Teh. Teh agreed and so both parties met in Teh's HongKong office and came into an agreement to purchase the swimming pool equipments, no contract was written since Teh was hesitant and even said that there is no need since it will take time to prepare but a sales invoice was prepared by Teh

    The agreement was the goods were to be shipped from the US to the victim's country by CIF basis (cost, freight, insurance, services of a technician to properly install the equipment). Teh informed victim company that Colorado Time System would not start production unless full payment is received by them in advance, so as not to delay the arrival of the much needed equipments, victim company decided to wire the full payment to Teh's company.

    Several months had passed but no shipment came in, victim company was so worried that it sent several communications with Teh but were unanswered by Teh. So victim company decided to go to HongKong and personally meet Teh but when victim company went to its HK office, victim found out that it was a secretarial services kind of office and not a real office, the building was not owned by Colorado Time Systems as what Teh informed victim. Finally victim was able to find Teh after calling its mobile and leaving word with the virtual office/secretarial services office because victim didn't want to leave said virtual office unless Teh shows up which eventually Teh did show up and talks resumed.

    Upon the arrival of the goods several months after receiving victim's 100% full payment, victim learned that the freight was not paid by US Company because the forwarder gave its bill to victim and would not release the goods unless freight is paid. Victim had no choice but to pay the freight so goods were delivered, upon checking of the goods, victim found out that the goods was incomplete and turned out was only partial of the complete set.

    Very frustrated, victim contacted Teh again, after several days of no reply, Teh finally sent an email to victim saying some parts were missing because it was still under production. Once it is finished it will be delivered, victim waited for another 2 months before shipment arrived. Again, victim was surprised to learn that freight was not paid again by US company so it had no choice but to pay again the freight for the goods to be released.

    Victim's warehouse called up and informed victim that the manuals were missing and not in the boxes so they didn't know how to operate or assemble the items. Victim contacted Teh and asked why the manuals were not included, Teh was unable to give any reason and offered to send the manuals. After several months, manuals were received by victim.

    Victim suspected Teh's action so it made inquiry with other swimming pool equipment companies and victim found out that the items sold by US Company through its agent Richard Teh was overpriced!! It was higher than the other companies' prices for the same equipments. Victim went back to question Teh re the price but Teh was no where to be found, Teh was not answering emails, phone calls & fax messages and when victim went to HongKong, the victim found out that the branch office turned out to be a VIRTUAL OFFICE and the lady receptionist said Teh was not in the country etc. etc. Victim contacted the US Company but the president/owner claimed he cannot give any refund as he was fully unaware of what their Vice President in Asia Pacific (RICHARD TEH) was doing and how he got the deal!! The owner of this US Company, however, denied the allegation that their equipments were over-priced!

    Victim was unable to get any refund for the overpriced equipments and is currently still looking for RICHARD TEH a.k.a. TEH KOK LEONG

  12. #12
    maran91 Guest

    Re: Why don't more people complain publicly?

    Final Answer why people don't complain

    This is from time magazine - Spammers Revenge

    Imagine that a message plops unbidden into your e-mail In box. Imagine that 10 just like it soon follow, all with a fake return address, none from a name you recognize. You take umbrage. You let it be known on your website that the sender is a scurrilous spammer, a clogger of In boxes, a violator of the right to privacy. It is a small gesture yet one you believe is important in the war on spam, and besides, it makes you feel good.
    Until, of course, you get sued.
    With pornography, sleazy offers and other unsolicited junk filling In boxes at record rates, revenge has blossomed into a righteous cause. But as Mark Mumma, an Internet-services provider and antispam crusader from Oklahoma City, Okla., will tell you, spats over spam can get messy. The recipient's privacy comes into play, but so does the sender's free speech. What states call spam the feds may consider innocuous commercial e-mail. And when spam rage takes over, you, like Mumma, can get sued for calling a spammer a spammer.
    Mumma's problems began two years ago with a simple e-mail message: How about a relaxing cruise? Labeled an "E-deal," it came from a nonworking address and included bogus information in its header, the section that says where an e-mail has been. Mumma got the message, the e-deal falsely claimed, because he had asked for it.
    Unfortunately for the sender, Mumma was an Internet pro. Since 1997 he had hosted Web pages, run e-mail services and maintained an antispam website that listed hundreds of addresses whose owners did not want unsolicited mail. He knew Oklahoma and federal law generally banned e-mails that lied about their origin or their paths through the Internet, and he wasn't shy about using the law to make a point. The text of the offending e-deal revealed that it had come from Cruise.com a subsidiary of Omega World Travel in Fairfax, Va. Mumma called Omega's general counsel, the curiously named John Lawless, and got him to promise that neither Mumma nor any of the addresses listed on Mumma's website would receive more mail.
    But on the very next day, a second e-deal arrived. This time Mumma threatened to sue Omega for $150,000 under antispam laws unless it agreed to settle for $6,250, an arbitrary amount that Mumma considered reasonable. Omega refused to pay, and before it removed Mumma from the Cruise.com mailing list, nine more e-deals landed in his box. Then things got ugly.
    Mumma posted photos of the company's founders on his website and called them Cruise.com spammers." They sued Mumma in Virginia federal court for besmirching their reputations, and he countersued for violations under state and federal antispam laws. Much to Mumma's shock, the trial judge dismissed his suit, ruling that the e-deals weren't misleading enough to be spam. In November the U.S. court of appeals in Richmond agreed. But the founders' case survived, and as it heads for trial before the federal district in Virginia, Mumma faces the possibility of owing $3.8 million in damages for speaking his mind.
    And you wondered why spam was so hard to stop.

    Truth be told, companies like Omega aren't the real problem. Sure, Cruise.com sent Mumma unsolicited e-mails with a funky return address. And it sent 11 of them. But Mumma might have stopped future messages by clicking on a highlighted link, something he refused to do because, he says, "that just gets you on more spam lists." Maybe so. It's clear, though, that unlike some Nigerian scam artist bent on fooling e-mail filters, the company didn't try to hide its identity.
    Still, dramatic increases in spam reported by Ironport and other e-mail-- security firms show that antispam activists like Mumma are overmatched, and the law is not helping. Since Nevada adopted the nation's first antispam statute in 1997, 37 other states have provided the legal basis for dinging spammers that send misleading e-mails. But in 2003 the feds trumped most of those laws by enacting a statutory mouthful, the Controlling the Assault of Non- Solicited Pornography and Marketing Act.
    As its unfortunate acronym suggests, the CAN-SPAM Act did not so much prohibit spamming as show companies how to do it. That's because Congress bungled an attempt to balance two constitutional interests: a privacy right (freedom from unwanted e-mails) and a free-speech right (freedom to send advertising--a type of speech--by e-mail). Instead of guarding privacy by allowing commercial e-mail only when people asked for it, Congress favored the speech rights of e-mailers: consumers bear the burden of telling spammers to stop. Congress also said e-mail couldn't be "materially" misleading about its source, but other than that, spam away.
    It was the word "materially" that tripped up Mumma. The appeals court ruled that bogus return addresses and header information didn't make e-deals "materially" misleading; after all, Mumma was able to track down the messages' source. The court's decision further weakens privacy in favor of free speech--at least for spammers. For their critics, the message is harsher: keep your mouth shut, or you could get sued.

  13. #13
    maran91 Guest

    Re: Why don't more people complain publicly?

    I know for a fact that Defrawy filed several siuts against people on this board. He now has three in house attorneys.

  14. 01-11-2007, 04:25 PM

    Reason
    FORUM VIOLATION

  15. #14
    maran91 Guest

    Re: Why don't more people complain publicly?

    Wasn't Jesus tried and convicted of a crime and sentenced to death?

    If he was alive today people on this site would be calling him a scammer.

    Maybe in 2000 years we will be praying to Alec?

    Scary, huh?

  16. #15
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Posts
    1

    Re: Why don't more people complain publicly?

    I was in a band in the 60's called the Beatles and one of my band mates John said something to the same effect it got us in to a bit of trouble I say. Listen I have had the pleasure of working with Alec and he is a fun guy, he really helped me with some hard times. We sometimes wish he could have been in the band with us. Alec is you are reading this get your chin up like you used to tell me.

    Paul M

  17. #16

    Re: Why don't more people complain publicly?

    The guy hangs with the Back Street Boys, Lou Pearlman, Hollywood Actors, Models, The Dallas Cowboys and their Cheerleaders and now you are saying he is friends with the Beatles? Come on now who is this guy, why don't I see him on E Television every night?

Similar Threads

  1. Replies: 28
    Last Post: 11-22-2012, 10:00 PM
  2. Get healthy people and complain less.
    By theme in forum Political Scams
    Replies: 4
    Last Post: 10-18-2009, 06:44 PM
  3. publicly funded Islamic classes
    By Thorgrimm in forum Political Scams
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 04-12-2008, 10:39 AM
  4. The Right has NO ROOM to complain ....
    By Long Time Austinite in forum Political Scams
    Replies: 23
    Last Post: 07-31-2007, 12:55 PM
  5. Saudi Arabia publicly warns US/Israel
    By Americanadian in forum Political Scams
    Replies: 6
    Last Post: 07-28-2006, 03:39 PM

Tags for this Thread

Add / Edit Tags
$100, acted, action, address, affairs, agen, agreed, agreement, alert, allowing, another, arrival, artist, aware, balance, banned, based, ben, bit, bogus, bomb, boxes, building, bull, bullshit, bunch, cable, call, cancel, care, careful, cer, chan, chea, class, close, collectors, company., complain, complete, corporate, cost, couldn, counting, cowboys, cruise, customer, dallas, david, day, dead, death, decision, demand, deserve, district, doe, don, due, ends, evening, examples, experience, extort, extra, fake, federal, feds, free, front, future, google news, hands, held, helped, helping, hey, hide, higher, house, huge, hypocritical, identity, imagine, important, include, information, insurance, internet, job, john, joke, judge, karma, kidnapping, lady, law, legal, lied, line, lis, listed, listen, local, long, long run, longer, los, loves, mail, mails, make money, manuals, mark, market, marketing, mea, media, meeting, members, million, mind, misleading, money, named, nation, national, needed, newest, newspaper, north, office, opportunity, organization, owned, owner, owners, part, passed, pay, payment, pays, people, person, personal, phone number, photos, pos, post, posted, prepared, presiden, prevent, prices, privacy, pro, problems, production, protection, provider, public, pyramid, question, rea, real, reason, reasonable, receiving, record, reform, refund, refused, release, released, removed, representative, reputations, research, responsible, scam, scam artist, search, secure, security, sen, sender, service, services, shipment, shows, shut, sign, site, small, soo, source, specifically, start, states, stop, stories, street, sued, systems, talking, threatened, tied, times, told, tortured, track, treatment, trial, trumped, types, ugly, unlimited, unwan, url, usa, vice, victimized, view, vince, virtual, wanted, warehouse, website, weeks, wire, won, working, workplace, world

View Tag Cloud

Bookmarks

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may post new threads
  • You may post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may edit your posts
  •