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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Posts
    3

    MLC Capital & friends - bad news

    Since I have posted on this site regarding MLC Capital, i have received several responces and all of them have been negative experiences. People losing their deposits and unable to contact anyone from the company. They put on a good show but they will not follow through. I had my attorney review the contract they sent me and he told me there are some big loopholes in it and they could take my $$$ without any problems. My advise, which is free so consider the source, is watch out for these companies. They took me and several others for a ride and we lost; some of us a lot of money. One company called me and said they wanted to take this to the FBI. I was able to pull out fast enough and stop the wire transfer so I dont have a case but it sounds like they do.

    The network of business names are: MCL Capital, Worldwide Business Limited, Asia Pacific Global Project Underwriters, and A-Z Investments. I am sure there are more of them, but these are just what I know of. Also Larry Marsella, based out of Northern florida will take your retainer fee and promise big things but not follow through.

    Good luck and becareful

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Posts
    3

    Re: MLC Capital & friends - bad news

    I want to clarify, MLC Capital is based out of England, but they put there contracts through other countries. If there are US based firms named MLC capital, I am not refering to those groups. The MLC Capital generally are unavailable and you can not get a responce from their principles.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Posts
    3

    Re: MLC Capital & friends - bad news

    Well I can't say if Larry would get to you are not.
    But I can say if he had a chance he would.
    I done some dealing with him and his lender, and they wanted their up front cost or fees.
    I call the SEC, and the FBI, and talk to them about this, and this is what they said to me.
    If you run into any Brokers or Lenders that want to charge you a up front fee run the other way.
    By the law this is illlegal.
    They can demand a fee after the loan has gone through, but before look and run the other way.
    The person that I talk to said that 99 ot 100 lenders and brokers that demand a fee before the loan, is out to get your money, and you get screw.
    So yes if you give a Broker or a Lender any money up front your going to get it in the shorts.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Posts
    1

    Re: MLC Capital & friends - bad news

    I have used MLC [Larry Marcella] for two different projects and had no trouble with him getting me funded. The First project it took him 64 days to get funded and the second took only 45 days. Both loans were for over 15 million dollars. I can only say good things about him. he was very professional and kept me informed. I would highly recommend him to anybody

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Posts
    2

    Re: MLC Capital & friends - bad news

    Forum Rules
    SCAM.COM contains information that is miss-leading and is no better then the Trash Magazines all FICTION .
    Although the administrators and moderators of scams will attempt to keep all objectionable messages off this forum, it is impossible for us to review all messages. All messages express the views of the author, and neither the owners of scams, nor Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd. (developers of vBulletin) will be held responsible for the content of any message.
    By agreeing to these rules, you warrant that you will not post any messages that are obscene, vulgar, sexually-oriented, hateful, threatening, or otherwise violates of any laws.
    The owners of scams reserve the right to remove, edit, move or close any thread for any reason.
    SCAM.COM contains information that is miss-leading and is no better then the Trash Magazines all FICTION .:

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Posts
    2

    Re: MLC Capital & friends - bad news

    Re: Worldwide Business Limited (WWB Limited)

    NOTICE TO ALL VIEWERS

    All these postings are fraudulent and not verifiable. Anyone can post and say anything without it being validated. These posting are no better then the trash magazines at your local grocery store all fiction. All deals fund on their own merit and timeframe. Business plans that need further review and are questionable cause’s delays in any transaction. Not following the direction of the lender will also cause delays in funding. Those of you who believe the posting are the truth need to get a life.

    NOTICE TO THE CLIENTS ATTORNEYS: If this is as far as your investigative ability takes you then you are wasting your client’s money. Attorneys need to talk to the Funder/Lender for further investigation. Vindictive people in this world are evil and are hurting the chances of funding for clients who think the postings are the truth.

    NOTICE AGAIN TO ANY FUTURE POSTINGS: Anyone who plans to post fraudulent and vindictive statements will also be included in our lawsuit. Please think twice about posting and being included in the lawsuit.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Posts
    6

    Re: MLC Capital & friends - bad news

    QueryReportsvUtilitiesvLogout Cat12, LC2, Limbert, Termed

    U.S. District Court
    Northern District of Ohio (Akron)
    CIVIL DOCKET FOR CASE #: 5:06-cv-01587-JG

    Rockwell Enterprises, Inc. v. Asia Pacific Global Project Underwriters, LTD et al
    Assigned to: Judge James S. Gwin
    Cause: 28:1332 Diversity-Fraud
    Date Filed: 06/29/2006
    Date Terminated: 11/22/2006
    Jury Demand: Plaintiff
    Nature of Suit: 370 Fraud or Truth-In-Lending
    Jurisdiction: Diversity
    Plaintiff
    Rockwell Enterprises, Inc. represented by Erik J. Wineland
    Gallagher Sharp - Toledo
    Ste. 1250
    420 Madison Avenue
    Toledo, OH 43604
    419-241-4863
    Fax: 419-241-4866
    Email: [email protected]
    LEAD ATTORNEY
    ATTORNEY TO BE NOTICED

    Robert C. Hunt, Jr.
    Ste. 206
    159 South Main Street
    Akron, OH 44308
    330-253-1111
    Fax: 330-253-1117
    Email: [email protected]
    LEAD ATTORNEY
    ATTORNEY TO BE NOTICED


    V.

    Defendant
    Asia Pacific Global Project Underwriters, LTD
    TERMINATED: 08/01/2006

    Defendant
    Clifford N. Kelley
    TERMINATED: 08/01/2006

    Defendant
    David M. Maser
    TERMINATED: 08/01/2006

    Defendant
    Donald Garcia represented by Erik J. Wineland
    (See above for address)
    LEAD ATTORNEY
    ATTORNEY TO BE NOTICED

    Defendant
    Tom Atkins represented by Erik J. Wineland
    (See above for address)
    LEAD ATTORNEY
    ATTORNEY TO BE NOTICED

    Robert C. Hunt, Jr.
    (See above for address)
    LEAD ATTORNEY
    ATTORNEY TO BE NOTICED

    Defendant
    A-Z Investments, Inc. represented by Erik J. Wineland
    (See above for address)
    LEAD ATTORNEY
    ATTORNEY TO BE NOTICED

    Robert C. Hunt, Jr.
    (See above for address)
    LEAD ATTORNEY
    ATTORNEY TO BE NOTICED

    Defendant
    A-Z Investments & Funding, Inc. represented by Erik J. Wineland
    (See above for address)
    LEAD ATTORNEY
    ATTORNEY TO BE NOTICED

    Robert C. Hunt, Jr.
    (See above for address)
    LEAD ATTORNEY
    ATTORNEY TO BE NOTICED


    Date Filed # Docket Text
    06/29/2006 1 Complaint with jury demand against A-Z Investments & Funding, Inc., Asia Pacific Global Project Underwriters, LTD, Clifford N. Kelley, David M. Maser, Donald Garcia, Tom Atkins and A-Z Investments, Inc. (Filing fee $350 paid; receipt number 54660000237) Filed by Rockwell Enterprises, Inc. (Attachments: # 1 Exhibit A# 2 Exhibit B# 3 Exhibit C# 4 Exhibit D# 5 Exhibit E# 6 Civil Cover Sheet)(S, He) (Entered: 06/30/2006)
    06/29/2006 Summons and Magistrate Consent Form issued to counsel for service upon A-Z Investments & Funding, Inc., Asia Pacific Global Project Underwriters, LTD, Clifford N. Kelley, David M. Maser, Donald Garcia, Tom Atkins and A-Z Investments, Inc. (S, He) (Entered: 06/30/2006)
    06/29/2006 Random Assignment of Magistrate Judge George J. Limbert, pursuant to Local Rule 3.1. (S, He) (Entered: 06/30/2006)
    06/29/2006 2 Corporate Disclosure Statement filed by Rockwell Enterprises, Inc. (S, He) (Entered: 06/30/2006)
    07/20/2006 3 Return of Service Executed upon Clifford N. Kelley and Asia Pacific Global Project Underwriters LTD by Fed. Ex. International overnight delivery on 6/30/06 filed by Rockwell Enterprises, Inc. Related document(s) 1 . (R, N) (Entered: 07/21/2006)
    07/20/2006 4 Return of Service Executed upon Tom Atkins by certified mail on 7/3/06 filed by Rockwell Enterprises, Inc. (Related document(s) 1 ). (R, N) (Entered: 07/24/2006)
    07/20/2006 5 Return of Service Executed upon A-Z Investments, Inc. by certified mail on 7/3/06 filed by Rockwell Enterprises, Inc. (Related document(s) 1 ). (R, N) (Entered: 07/24/2006)
    07/20/2006 6 Return of Service Executed upon Mr. David M. Maser by certified mail on 6/29/06 filed by Rockwell Enterprises, Inc. (Related document(s) 1 ). (R, N) (Entered: 07/24/2006)
    07/20/2006 7 Return of Service Executed upon A-Z Investments & Funding, Inc. by certified mail, no date indicated on green card filed by Rockwell Enterprises, Inc. (Related document(s) 1 ). (R, N) (Entered: 07/24/2006)
    07/20/2006 8 Return of Service Executed upon Donald Garcia by certified mail on 7/5/06 filed by Rockwell Enterprises, Inc. (Related document(s) 1 ). (R, N) (Entered: 07/24/2006)
    07/26/2006 9 Attorney Appearance of Erik J. Wineland filed by A-Z Investments & Funding, Inc., Donald Garcia, Tom Atkins and A-Z Investments, Inc.. (B, T) (Entered: 07/27/2006)
    07/26/2006 10 Answer to Complaint (Related Doc # 1 ) filed by Donald Garcia. (B, T) (Entered: 07/27/2006)
    07/26/2006 11 Answer to Complaint (Related Doc # 1 ) filed by Tom Atkins. (B, T) (Entered: 07/27/2006)
    07/26/2006 12 Answer to Complaint (Related Doc # 1 ) filed by A-Z Investments, Inc.. (B, T) (Entered: 07/27/2006)
    07/26/2006 13 Answer to Complaint (Related Doc # 1 ) filed by A-Z Investments & Funding, Inc.. (B, T) (Entered: 07/27/2006)
    07/26/2006 14 Notice of failure to file electronically, pursuant to Local Rule 5.1(c). Non-compliant document: 13 Answer to Complaint filed by A-Z Investments & Funding, Inc., 9 Attorney Appearance, 12 Answer to Complaint filed by A-Z Investments, Inc., 11 Answer to Complaint filed by Tom Atkins, 10 Answer to Complaint filed by Donald Garcia. Related document(s) 13 , 9 , 12 , 11 , 10 . (B, T) (Entered: 07/27/2006)
    07/28/2006 15 Notice of Party Dismissal Under FRCP 41(a)(1) filed by Rockwell Enterprises, Inc.. (R, N) (Entered: 07/28/2006)
    08/01/2006 16 Order and notice of voluntary dismissal with prejudice of Defendants Asia Pacific Global Project Underwriters, Ltd., Clifford N. Kelley and David M. Maser approved by Judge James S. Gwin on 8/1/06. (Related Doc. 15 ) (M, G) (Entered: 08/01/2006)
    08/02/2006 17 Attorney Appearance by Erik Wineland filed by on behalf of A-Z Investments & Funding, Inc., Donald Garcia, Tom Atkins, A-Z Investments, Inc.. (R, N) (Entered: 08/02/2006)
    08/02/2006 18 Motion for extension of time until 8/30/06 to to move, plead or otherwise respond to plaintiff's complaint filed by A-Z Investments & Funding, Inc., Donald Garcia, Tom Atkins, A-Z Investments, Inc.. (R, N) (Entered: 08/02/2006)
    08/03/2006 19 Marginal Order signed by Judge James S. Gwin on 8/3/06 granting the motion of Defendants A-Z Investments & Funding, Garcia, Atkins and A-Z Investments to file their answers by 8/30/06. (Related Doc. 17 ) (M, G) (Entered: 08/03/2006)
    09/21/2006 20 FILING ERROR - ATTORNEY TO RE-FILE - Motion to change/transfer venue or Stay For Binding Arbitration filed by all defendants. Related document(s) 1 . (Wineland, Erik) Modified text on 9/22/2006 (S, T). (Entered: 09/21/2006)
    10/03/2006 21 Case Management Conference Scheduling Order signed by Judge James S. Gwin on 10/3/06 setting a conference for 11/7/06 at 12:15 p.m., in Chambers 18A (Cleveland). (Attachments: # 1 Rule 30.1, # 2 Attorney ECF Registration Form, # 3 Consent Package) (M, G) (Entered: 10/03/2006)
    10/05/2006 22 Motion to change/transfer venue to the United States District Court, Northern District of California, and/or Motion to stay Proceedings Pending Arbitration filed by A-Z Investments & Funding, Inc., Donald Garcia, Tom Atkins, A-Z Investments, Inc. Related document(s) 1 . (Attachments: # 1 Exhibit)(Wineland, Erik) Modified text on 10/5/2006 (S, T). (Entered: 10/05/2006)
    11/06/2006 23 Motion to continue Case Management Conference of November 7, 2006 filed by A-Z Investments & Funding, Inc., Donald Garcia, Tom Atkins, A-Z Investments, Inc.. Related document(s) 21 . (Wineland, Erik) (Entered: 11/06/2006)
    11/06/2006 24 Marginal Order signed by Judge James S. Gwin on 11/6/06 granting defendants' motion for a continuance of the case management conference. The conference is reset for 11/21/06 at 1:00 p.m., in Chambers 18A (Cleveland). (Related Doc. 21 , 23 ) (M, G) (Entered: 11/06/2006)
    11/14/2006 25 Motion to permit the parties to attend the Case Management Conference scheduled for 11/21/06, by telephone filed by A-Z Investments & Funding, Inc., Donald Garcia, Tom Atkins, A-Z Investments, Inc.. Related document(s) 24 . (Attachments: # 1 Exhibit Elmer Chang, M.D. Letter# 2 Exhibit Prostate PSA results# 3 Exhibit Donald Atkins memo)(Wineland, Erik) Modified on 11/16/2006 (R, N). (Entered: 11/14/2006)
    11/17/2006 26 Reply To defendants' Motion To Stay Proceedings filed by Rockwell Enterprises, Inc. (Hunt, Robert) Related document 22 . Exhibits incorporated. Modified text & link on 11/20/2006 (S, T). (Entered: 11/17/2006)
    11/17/2006 27 Report of Parties' Planning Meeting filed by all parties. (Hunt, Robert) Modified text on 11/20/2006 (S, T). (Entered: 11/17/2006)
    11/19/2006 28 Marginal Order signed by Judge James S. Gwin on 11/19/06 granting defendants' motion for their representatives to attend the case management conference via telephone. Counsel shall attend in person. (Related Doc. 25 ) (M, G) (Entered: 11/19/2006)
    11/20/2006 29 Motion to withdraw as attorney for Donald Garcia filed by Erik Wineland. Related document(s) 25 . (Attachments: # 1Exhibit 1)(Wineland, Erik) Modified text on 11/21/2006 (S, T). (Entered: 11/20/2006)
    11/21/2006 30 Minutes of case management conference before Judge James S. Gwin on 11/21/06. (Court Reporter: C. Mahnke) (M, G) (Entered: 11/22/2006)
    11/22/2006 31 Order signed by Judge James S. Gwin on 11/22/06 that, upon representation of the counsel that all issues have been resolved, the docket is marked settled and dismissed with prejudice. (M, G) (Entered: 11/22/2006)
    01/09/2007 32 Proposed Consent Decree filed by all parties. Related document(s) 31 , 30 . (Hunt, Robert) Requested to be re-filed in text searchable format. Modified on 1/10/2007 (P, S). (Entered: 01/09/2007)
    01/10/2007 33 Proposed Consent Decree filed by all parties. Related document(s) 31 , 30 . (Hunt, Robert) (Entered: 01/10/2007)
    01/10/2007 34 Stipulated Judgment approved by Judge James S. Gwin on 1/10/07. (Related Doc. 33 ) (M, G) (Entered: 01/10/2007)


    --------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    PACER Service Center
    Transaction Receipt


    04/26/2008 10:30:54
    PACER Login: Client Code:
    Description: Docket Report Search Criteria: 5:06-cv-01587-JG


    --------------------------------------------------------------------------------













    Quote Originally Posted by NWguy View Post
    Since I have posted on this site regarding MLC Capital, i have received several responces and all of them have been negative experiences. People losing their deposits and unable to contact anyone from the company. They put on a good show but they will not follow through. I had my attorney review the contract they sent me and he told me there are some big loopholes in it and they could take my $$$ without any problems. My advise, which is free so consider the source, is watch out for these companies. They took me and several others for a ride and we lost; some of us a lot of money. One company called me and said they wanted to take this to the FBI. I was able to pull out fast enough and stop the wire transfer so I dont have a case but it sounds like they do.

    The network of business names are: MCL Capital, Worldwide Business Limited, Asia Pacific Global Project Underwriters, and A-Z Investments. I am sure there are more of them, but these are just what I know of. Also Larry Marsella, based out of Northern florida will take your retainer fee and promise big things but not follow through.

    Good luck and becareful

  8. #8
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Posts
    7

    Highbank and Partners and Morris Goldman

    Our Company started with Morris Goldamn in 2006. Known as Highbank International. Project never funded. After contacting the FBI we found out that they are close to putting them all in jail. The SEC doesn't allow this behavior. Do not send any funds to Morris Goldman. He is a lying dog who takes people money. There are no investors to fund your project. His company is called Highbank International. Now operating under a new name. It is illegal to sign your company stock over without having all parties contact information. If you know anyone who is trying to do business with Larry Marcella and Morris Goldman, please let us know. Again, help is on the way. If you are waiting for your poject to fund, do not send them any more money, your poject will never fund. They will keep delaying you and will not repsond to your email.

    We have never been able to talk to them via phone. Please when he tells you they will forward the information to their lawyers, he is the lawyer. There is no lawyer.

    When he says that "we will not proceed", tell him to go to hell and jail is waiting for him. Many have came forward and we need others to come.

    We found out that he has sent over 15 clients the same emails with the same bull shit. Its been over 15 months and we have made a lot of progress. If you can give us any information that will help us put him and his group prison, please let us know. We will be sending out the individuals in his group. Tell him to kiss your ass because he can't produce what you need for the SEC.















    Quote Originally Posted by j333333 View Post
    Well I can't say if Larry would get to you are not.
    But I can say if he had a chance he would.
    I done some dealing with him and his lender, and they wanted their up front cost or fees.
    I call the SEC, and the FBI, and talk to them about this, and this is what they said to me.
    If you run into any Brokers or Lenders that want to charge you a up front fee run the other way.
    By the law this is illlegal.
    They can demand a fee after the loan has gone through, but before look and run the other way.
    The person that I talk to said that 99 ot 100 lenders and brokers that demand a fee before the loan, is out to get your money, and you get screw.
    So yes if you give a Broker or a Lender any money up front your going to get it in the shorts.
    Last edited by vfbicia; 05-04-2008 at 03:05 AM.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Posts
    7

    Re: MLC Capital & friends - /Higthbank Int

    Highbank Internationa and Highbank and Partners and Morris Goldam is the head leader of all these fake companies.
    Quote Originally Posted by Stellair View Post
    QueryReportsvUtilitiesvLogout Cat12, LC2, Limbert, Termed

    U.S. District Court
    Northern District of Ohio (Akron)
    CIVIL DOCKET FOR CASE #: 5:06-cv-01587-JG

    Rockwell Enterprises, Inc. v. Asia Pacific Global Project Underwriters, LTD et al
    Assigned to: Judge James S. Gwin
    Cause: 28:1332 Diversity-Fraud
    Date Filed: 06/29/2006
    Date Terminated: 11/22/2006
    Jury Demand: Plaintiff
    Nature of Suit: 370 Fraud or Truth-In-Lending
    Jurisdiction: Diversity
    Plaintiff
    Rockwell Enterprises, Inc. represented by Erik J. Wineland
    Gallagher Sharp - Toledo
    Ste. 1250
    420 Madison Avenue
    Toledo, OH 43604
    419-241-4863
    Fax: 419-241-4866
    Email: [email protected]
    LEAD ATTORNEY
    ATTORNEY TO BE NOTICED

    Robert C. Hunt, Jr.
    Ste. 206
    159 South Main Street
    Akron, OH 44308
    330-253-1111
    Fax: 330-253-1117
    Email: [email protected]
    LEAD ATTORNEY
    ATTORNEY TO BE NOTICED


    V.

    Defendant
    Asia Pacific Global Project Underwriters, LTD
    TERMINATED: 08/01/2006

    Defendant
    Clifford N. Kelley
    TERMINATED: 08/01/2006

    Defendant
    David M. Maser
    TERMINATED: 08/01/2006

    Defendant
    Donald Garcia represented by Erik J. Wineland
    (See above for address)
    LEAD ATTORNEY
    ATTORNEY TO BE NOTICED

    Defendant
    Tom Atkins represented by Erik J. Wineland
    (See above for address)
    LEAD ATTORNEY
    ATTORNEY TO BE NOTICED

    Robert C. Hunt, Jr.
    (See above for address)
    LEAD ATTORNEY
    ATTORNEY TO BE NOTICED

    Defendant
    A-Z Investments, Inc. represented by Erik J. Wineland
    (See above for address)
    LEAD ATTORNEY
    ATTORNEY TO BE NOTICED

    Robert C. Hunt, Jr.
    (See above for address)
    LEAD ATTORNEY
    ATTORNEY TO BE NOTICED

    Defendant
    A-Z Investments & Funding, Inc. represented by Erik J. Wineland
    (See above for address)
    LEAD ATTORNEY
    ATTORNEY TO BE NOTICED

    Robert C. Hunt, Jr.
    (See above for address)
    LEAD ATTORNEY
    ATTORNEY TO BE NOTICED


    Date Filed # Docket Text
    06/29/2006 1 Complaint with jury demand against A-Z Investments & Funding, Inc., Asia Pacific Global Project Underwriters, LTD, Clifford N. Kelley, David M. Maser, Donald Garcia, Tom Atkins and A-Z Investments, Inc. (Filing fee $350 paid; receipt number 54660000237) Filed by Rockwell Enterprises, Inc. (Attachments: # 1 Exhibit A# 2 Exhibit B# 3 Exhibit C# 4 Exhibit D# 5 Exhibit E# 6 Civil Cover Sheet)(S, He) (Entered: 06/30/2006)
    06/29/2006 Summons and Magistrate Consent Form issued to counsel for service upon A-Z Investments & Funding, Inc., Asia Pacific Global Project Underwriters, LTD, Clifford N. Kelley, David M. Maser, Donald Garcia, Tom Atkins and A-Z Investments, Inc. (S, He) (Entered: 06/30/2006)
    06/29/2006 Random Assignment of Magistrate Judge George J. Limbert, pursuant to Local Rule 3.1. (S, He) (Entered: 06/30/2006)
    06/29/2006 2 Corporate Disclosure Statement filed by Rockwell Enterprises, Inc. (S, He) (Entered: 06/30/2006)
    07/20/2006 3 Return of Service Executed upon Clifford N. Kelley and Asia Pacific Global Project Underwriters LTD by Fed. Ex. International overnight delivery on 6/30/06 filed by Rockwell Enterprises, Inc. Related document(s) 1 . (R, N) (Entered: 07/21/2006)
    07/20/2006 4 Return of Service Executed upon Tom Atkins by certified mail on 7/3/06 filed by Rockwell Enterprises, Inc. (Related document(s) 1 ). (R, N) (Entered: 07/24/2006)
    07/20/2006 5 Return of Service Executed upon A-Z Investments, Inc. by certified mail on 7/3/06 filed by Rockwell Enterprises, Inc. (Related document(s) 1 ). (R, N) (Entered: 07/24/2006)
    07/20/2006 6 Return of Service Executed upon Mr. David M. Maser by certified mail on 6/29/06 filed by Rockwell Enterprises, Inc. (Related document(s) 1 ). (R, N) (Entered: 07/24/2006)
    07/20/2006 7 Return of Service Executed upon A-Z Investments & Funding, Inc. by certified mail, no date indicated on green card filed by Rockwell Enterprises, Inc. (Related document(s) 1 ). (R, N) (Entered: 07/24/2006)
    07/20/2006 8 Return of Service Executed upon Donald Garcia by certified mail on 7/5/06 filed by Rockwell Enterprises, Inc. (Related document(s) 1 ). (R, N) (Entered: 07/24/2006)
    07/26/2006 9 Attorney Appearance of Erik J. Wineland filed by A-Z Investments & Funding, Inc., Donald Garcia, Tom Atkins and A-Z Investments, Inc.. (B, T) (Entered: 07/27/2006)
    07/26/2006 10 Answer to Complaint (Related Doc # 1 ) filed by Donald Garcia. (B, T) (Entered: 07/27/2006)
    07/26/2006 11 Answer to Complaint (Related Doc # 1 ) filed by Tom Atkins. (B, T) (Entered: 07/27/2006)
    07/26/2006 12 Answer to Complaint (Related Doc # 1 ) filed by A-Z Investments, Inc.. (B, T) (Entered: 07/27/2006)
    07/26/2006 13 Answer to Complaint (Related Doc # 1 ) filed by A-Z Investments & Funding, Inc.. (B, T) (Entered: 07/27/2006)
    07/26/2006 14 Notice of failure to file electronically, pursuant to Local Rule 5.1(c). Non-compliant document: 13 Answer to Complaint filed by A-Z Investments & Funding, Inc., 9 Attorney Appearance, 12 Answer to Complaint filed by A-Z Investments, Inc., 11 Answer to Complaint filed by Tom Atkins, 10 Answer to Complaint filed by Donald Garcia. Related document(s) 13 , 9 , 12 , 11 , 10 . (B, T) (Entered: 07/27/2006)
    07/28/2006 15 Notice of Party Dismissal Under FRCP 41(a)(1) filed by Rockwell Enterprises, Inc.. (R, N) (Entered: 07/28/2006)
    08/01/2006 16 Order and notice of voluntary dismissal with prejudice of Defendants Asia Pacific Global Project Underwriters, Ltd., Clifford N. Kelley and David M. Maser approved by Judge James S. Gwin on 8/1/06. (Related Doc. 15 ) (M, G) (Entered: 08/01/2006)
    08/02/2006 17 Attorney Appearance by Erik Wineland filed by on behalf of A-Z Investments & Funding, Inc., Donald Garcia, Tom Atkins, A-Z Investments, Inc.. (R, N) (Entered: 08/02/2006)
    08/02/2006 18 Motion for extension of time until 8/30/06 to to move, plead or otherwise respond to plaintiff's complaint filed by A-Z Investments & Funding, Inc., Donald Garcia, Tom Atkins, A-Z Investments, Inc.. (R, N) (Entered: 08/02/2006)
    08/03/2006 19 Marginal Order signed by Judge James S. Gwin on 8/3/06 granting the motion of Defendants A-Z Investments & Funding, Garcia, Atkins and A-Z Investments to file their answers by 8/30/06. (Related Doc. 17 ) (M, G) (Entered: 08/03/2006)
    09/21/2006 20 FILING ERROR - ATTORNEY TO RE-FILE - Motion to change/transfer venue or Stay For Binding Arbitration filed by all defendants. Related document(s) 1 . (Wineland, Erik) Modified text on 9/22/2006 (S, T). (Entered: 09/21/2006)
    10/03/2006 21 Case Management Conference Scheduling Order signed by Judge James S. Gwin on 10/3/06 setting a conference for 11/7/06 at 12:15 p.m., in Chambers 18A (Cleveland). (Attachments: # 1 Rule 30.1, # 2 Attorney ECF Registration Form, # 3 Consent Package) (M, G) (Entered: 10/03/2006)
    10/05/2006 22 Motion to change/transfer venue to the United States District Court, Northern District of California, and/or Motion to stay Proceedings Pending Arbitration filed by A-Z Investments & Funding, Inc., Donald Garcia, Tom Atkins, A-Z Investments, Inc. Related document(s) 1 . (Attachments: # 1 Exhibit)(Wineland, Erik) Modified text on 10/5/2006 (S, T). (Entered: 10/05/2006)
    11/06/2006 23 Motion to continue Case Management Conference of November 7, 2006 filed by A-Z Investments & Funding, Inc., Donald Garcia, Tom Atkins, A-Z Investments, Inc.. Related document(s) 21 . (Wineland, Erik) (Entered: 11/06/2006)
    11/06/2006 24 Marginal Order signed by Judge James S. Gwin on 11/6/06 granting defendants' motion for a continuance of the case management conference. The conference is reset for 11/21/06 at 1:00 p.m., in Chambers 18A (Cleveland). (Related Doc. 21 , 23 ) (M, G) (Entered: 11/06/2006)
    11/14/2006 25 Motion to permit the parties to attend the Case Management Conference scheduled for 11/21/06, by telephone filed by A-Z Investments & Funding, Inc., Donald Garcia, Tom Atkins, A-Z Investments, Inc.. Related document(s) 24 . (Attachments: # 1 Exhibit Elmer Chang, M.D. Letter# 2 Exhibit Prostate PSA results# 3 Exhibit Donald Atkins memo)(Wineland, Erik) Modified on 11/16/2006 (R, N). (Entered: 11/14/2006)
    11/17/2006 26 Reply To defendants' Motion To Stay Proceedings filed by Rockwell Enterprises, Inc. (Hunt, Robert) Related document 22 . Exhibits incorporated. Modified text & link on 11/20/2006 (S, T). (Entered: 11/17/2006)
    11/17/2006 27 Report of Parties' Planning Meeting filed by all parties. (Hunt, Robert) Modified text on 11/20/2006 (S, T). (Entered: 11/17/2006)
    11/19/2006 28 Marginal Order signed by Judge James S. Gwin on 11/19/06 granting defendants' motion for their representatives to attend the case management conference via telephone. Counsel shall attend in person. (Related Doc. 25 ) (M, G) (Entered: 11/19/2006)
    11/20/2006 29 Motion to withdraw as attorney for Donald Garcia filed by Erik Wineland. Related document(s) 25 . (Attachments: # 1Exhibit 1)(Wineland, Erik) Modified text on 11/21/2006 (S, T). (Entered: 11/20/2006)
    11/21/2006 30 Minutes of case management conference before Judge James S. Gwin on 11/21/06. (Court Reporter: C. Mahnke) (M, G) (Entered: 11/22/2006)
    11/22/2006 31 Order signed by Judge James S. Gwin on 11/22/06 that, upon representation of the counsel that all issues have been resolved, the docket is marked settled and dismissed with prejudice. (M, G) (Entered: 11/22/2006)
    01/09/2007 32 Proposed Consent Decree filed by all parties. Related document(s) 31 , 30 . (Hunt, Robert) Requested to be re-filed in text searchable format. Modified on 1/10/2007 (P, S). (Entered: 01/09/2007)
    01/10/2007 33 Proposed Consent Decree filed by all parties. Related document(s) 31 , 30 . (Hunt, Robert) (Entered: 01/10/2007)
    01/10/2007 34 Stipulated Judgment approved by Judge James S. Gwin on 1/10/07. (Related Doc. 33 ) (M, G) (Entered: 01/10/2007)


    --------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    PACER Service Center
    Transaction Receipt


    04/26/2008 10:30:54
    PACER Login: Client Code:
    Description: Docket Report Search Criteria: 5:06-cv-01587-JG


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  10. #10
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Posts
    7

    Re: MLC Capital & friends - bad news

    Please give us the names and location of the projects and show proof. You have no proof and this thread is a fake and generated by his contact and or Larry himself. Goldman never sent you funds.



    Quote Originally Posted by dmr167 View Post
    I have used MLC [Larry Marcella] for two different projects and had no trouble with him getting me funded. The First project it took him 64 days to get funded and the second took only 45 days. Both loans were for over 15 million dollars. I can only say good things about him. he was very professional and kept me informed. I would highly recommend him to anybody

  11. #11
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Posts
    7

    Re: MLC Capital/Highbank-Partners-Morris Goldman

    Goldman and his gropu are all going to jail, very soon. The FBI is almost finish with theri investigation. If you have sent any money, please respond to this thread. We found out that Goldman is the leader and is very smart so be carful and do not let his so called professional emails fool you. He is the Lawyer, the investor and the broker. He in not a Senior Partner of any company, only a scam. Thats why you will never see any corporation documents etc. You can not produce nothing you don't have.

    We found out as of today, they have scammed people for many years and under several made up company names. They will never show you proof of any project (s) they have funded but want you to send them thousand of dollars. We were contacted by Goldman in early 2006, porject never funded. We had sent them over 200,000, others have sent more. The SEC did not have any list of registered stock under these companies name. We sent them our stock certificates and they filed the stock thru SEC.

    You can possible get your money back if you come forward. You don't have to give your name. Send us the wire transfer documents. We will be contacting all the banks they use for their "Appointed Agent". Morris Goldman your world is coming to an end.

  12. #12
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Posts
    7

    Highbank and Partners/International Morris Goldman

    INTERNATIONAL INVESTMENT FRAUD


    The investor information contained in this section was retrieved from the North American Securities Administrators Association, Inc ("NASAA").
    American investors, swept up in the overseas investment boom, would do well to temper their euphoria with the utmost caution since a new breed of con artists is cashing in on the rush to global investing. U.S.-based swindlers with bogus overseas investment schemes and high-pressure telephone "boiler room" sales operations located outside the United States will potentially defraud individual investors of billions of dollars during the 1990s.
    Complaints about overseas investment swindles involving precious metals, penny stocks, mining, coins, currency speculation, and special foreign banking instruments, such as certificates of deposit (CDs) with "sky-high, no risk" rates, are reported to state securities agencies and local Better Business Bureaus (BBBs) on a regular basis. Officials warn that the rise of off-shore boiler room operations will make it much more difficult, if not impossible, for investors to recover their funds and for law enforcement agencies to investigate and prosecute. Even mainstream foreign investments sometimes involve special risks and circumstances due to differing standards of marketplace regulation.
    Legitimate Overseas Investments
    North Americans are investing overseas in greater numbers and with more money than ever before. In part, this is a reflection of the fact that the international marketplace is becoming increasingly integrated and that international funds have made investing abroad easy. By the end of 1994, assets of U.S. managed international and global stock funds exceeded $160 billion -- with $40 billion invested in that year alone. Today, there are hundreds of funds divided into four categories: 1) Global funds that invest in both U.S. and foreign markets, 2) International funds that invest only outside the U.S., 3) Regional funds, and 4) Country funds.
    The number of foreign listings have also grown steadily on U.S. exchanges. By late 1996, the average daily volume of the New York Stock Exchange, for example, included some 12 percent each day from trading in non-U.S. securities. Chile was the fourth-largest contributor.
    Investors venturing overseas for the first time need to remember, however, that there are major risks involved. A strengthening dollar reduces the value of foreign investments owned by U.S. investors. A 20 percent drop in the value of a foreign currency relative to the U.S. dollar has the same impact as a 20 percent drop in that country's stock market prices. On the other hand, if the dollar weakens, foreign assets rise in value.
    Foreign governments could be overthrown -- touching off market declines -- or they could nationalize industries. In some countries, only a few hundred stocks trade in large quantities. This may result in exorbitant premiums not justified by the book value and fundamentals of the company involved.
    Although the trend is toward more open markets, major differences among national markets in procedures, practices, rules, and the threshold for fraudulent conditions can still trip up investors. For example, the Korean Stock Market, which is considered to be one of the least open in the world, bars nonresidents from owning South Korean stocks, except indirectly through nine trust funds. The Bogota (Columbia) Exchange has been identified by some law enforcement officials as a major front for many illegal operations, including the laundering of drug dollars. Investors who participated in Taiwan's 104 percent return in 1993 were disappointed when they tried to bring their capital home. The Taiwanese government imposed a three-month waiting period before capital could be repatriated.
    There also are sometimes differing views among nations about what are acceptable market activities. For example, the London Stock Exchange does not ban "bear raids" in which speculators try to drive down the price of a stock through short selling, a practice which is sharply limited under New York Stock Exchange Rules. In some countries, including Italy, Sweden, Belgium and Taiwan, there exist few prohibitions against insider trading. Malaysia, Greece and Kenya are among the nations with no government agency to safeguard the interests of investors and to guard against marketplace misconduct.
    These are among the issues and differences that regulators will grapple with as the world's marketplaces become even more tightly interwoven. Through NASAA, state securities agencies have taken a major role in the promotion of uniform registration requirements in the U.S. for foreign offerings and have joined in cooperative enforcement agreements in the international arena.
    Phony Overseas Investments
    Con artists are quick to pick up on the psychology of the investment climate and create "look alike" investment swindles that mirror "hot" investments in legitimate markets. During the worldwide oil crisis of the 1970s, scammers capitalized on the inclination of investors to dip their toes into the rising oil market by concocting oil and gas lease lottery application mills. After the "Black Monday" stock market crash of 1987, investment swindlers were quick to jump on investors' newfound distrust of paper investments by fashioning their own phony versions of tangible gold and mining investments, the so-called "dirt pile" scams that took an estimated $250 million from investors in 1988.
    Today, con artists see that U.S. investors are paying increasing attention to overseas investment opportunities. The new generation of scams have also "gone international." Most troubling is a growing pattern of former U.S. boiler room operators who have moved their telephone sales operations outside the U.S., frequently to Canada, Hong Kong, the Bahamas, Panama, Costa Rica, Europe, Liberia, and even South Africa. Some of these veteran con artists originally did their business in Florida and then moved on to southern California, hopscotching once again offshore. The locations of the boiler rooms are carefully chosen, with con artists dialing out of countries that have no extradition arrangements with U.S. law enforcement agencies.
    Protecting Yourself From International Securities Swindles
    What is true of all securities swindles -- that the best protection is to hang on to your money and not turn it over to a con artist -- is perhaps "truest" when it comes to international securities swindles. Enforcement efforts aimed at con men located overseas are extremely difficult and, in some cases, virtually impossible, due to poor relations between some nations and the absence of crucial enforcement mechanisms, such as extradition treaties. Here are some simple steps that investors can take to protect their interests:
    1. Don't be stampeded into the rush to international investing. If you listen to fellow investors and read the business news columns, it is easy to get the impression that everyone is investing overseas. But don't give in to the pressure to send your dollars overseas just to join the crowd. Make sure your investment is appropriate for your financial objectives and, in particular, your ability to assume risk.
    2. Learn something about foreign markets. How are investments regulated in the nation where you are thinking about sending your money? To what extent are investors in this market protected from investment fraud and abuse? What if you have to resolve some sort of dispute related to your investment? To what government agency would you go for assistance in resolving your problem?
    3. Remember: International isn't necessarily better. Even if investing overseas is one of the "hottest" activities going today for investors, it doesn't mean that the quality of the investment opportunities in other nations is any higher than those in the U.S. In fact, because of enforcement complications, the actual level of risk in overseas investments -- even in mainstream market products -- may be considerably higher than it is here, where markets are well regulated. (And once your money is gone, it may be impossible to recover, due to the practical difficulties involved in pursuing court action against foreign entities and individuals.) Keep your head on your shoulders when it comes to the hoopla about international investing.
    4. Consider U.S. investment alternatives that provide foreign exposure. Many American corporations listed on U.S. exchanges have large operations in foreign countries and get a significant portion of their revenue from sales overseas. Investing in the stocks and bonds of these companies, or in mutual funds made up of several of these companies, is one way to participate in the growth of foreign markets while keeping your dollars invested in U.S.-regulated corporations. The business reference section of the library is a good place to research these companies. Keep in mind that while these U.S. corporations may face stricter regulations than foreign firms, a company's earnings, and potentially its stock price, will still be affected by foreign currency fluctuations and political instability.
    5. Check with your state securities agency and BBB for complaints. If an investment is being sold to you, its promoter should be registered with your state securities agency. (For the number of your state's agency, call NASAA at 1-888-8-4-NASAA.) Ignore claims that overseas investment promoters are somehow exempt from state and federal securities law registration requirements -- they aren't. Also, take the time to inquire with your BBB about the company in question. It may have a record of customers' experiences with, or government actions against, the company.
    6. Keep in mind that if you are dealing with a stranger about something you can't check out with your own eyes... trouble may follow. Just because someone says that they have an oil well in Europe or a gold mine in South America does not mean that you have enough information on which to base an investment decision. Don't be deceived by slick-produced brochures that may make an enterprise look legitimate. If you don't have the contacts or financial resources to personally inspect your investment, consider carefully before giving up your money. In general, investors are best advised to deal with people they know and in investments they understand. If a stranger calls, pressuring you to invest "right away" in the huge profit potential of in Singapore options, think twice!

    A victim of securities investment fraud, he or she may have a claim against thestock broker and brokerage firm in arbitration or court under the following legal causes of action.


    A. Securities Fraud and Unsuitable Recommendations.
    Federal securities fraud under Section 10(b) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 is defined as “(1) material misstatements or omissions, (2) indicating an intent to deceive or defraud, (3) in connection with the purchase or sale of a security.” Brown v. E.F. Hutton Group, Inc., 991 F.2d 1020 (2nd Cir. 1993). An unsuitability claim is a subset of 10(b) securities fraud with the following elements to be proved:
    “(1) that the securities purchased were unsuited to the buyer’s needs; (2) that the defendant knew or reasonably believed the securities were unsuited to the buyer’s needs; (3) that the defendant recommended or purchased the unsuitable securities for the buyer anyway; (4) that, with scienter, the defendant made material misrepresentations (or, owing a duty to the buyer, failed to disclose material information) relating to the suitability of the securities; and (5) that the buyer justifiably relied to its detriment on the defendant’s fraudulent conduct.”
    Banca Cremi, S.A. v. Alex. Brown & Sons, Inc. 132 F.3d 1017, 1032 (4th Cir. 1997).
    “For Rule 10(b)(5) purposes, scienter includes recklessness.” Breard v. Sachnoff & Weaver, Ltd., 941 F.2d 142, 144 (2nd Cir. 1991).
    NASD Conduct Rule 2310 requires that NASD members “shall make reasonable efforts to obtain information concerning: (1) the customer’s financial status; (2) the customer’s tax status; (3) the customer’s investment objectives; and (4) such other information used or considered to be reasonable by such member or registered representative in making recommendations to the customer.” This information is then to be used in making a suitability determination under Rule 2310:
    “(a) In recommending to a customer the purchase, sale or exchange of any security, member shall have reasonable grounds for believing that the recommendation is suitable for such customer upon the basis of the facts, if any, disclosed by such customer as to his other security holdings and as to his financial situation and needs.”
    A “recommendation” has been further defined by the NASD in NASD Notice to Members 96-60 as follows:
    “… a broad range of circumstances may cause a transaction to be considered recommended, and this determination does not depend on the classification of the transaction by a particular member as “solicited” or “unsolicited.” In particular a transaction will be considered to be recommended when the member or its associated person brings a specific security to the attention of the customer through any means, including, but not limited to, direct telephone communication, the delivery of promotional material through the mail, or the transmission of electronic messages.”

    Breach of Fiduciary Duty.
    As set out by the 11th Circuit Court of Appeals: “[t]he law is clear that a broker owes a fiduciary duty of care and loyalty to a securities investor.” Gochnauer v. A.G. Edwards & Sons, Inc., 810 F.2d 1042, 1049 (11th Cir. 1987).
    A stockbroker is “an agent who owes his principal a duty to act only as authorized.” Merrill Lynch v. Cheng, 901 F.2d 1124, 1128 (D.C. Cir. 1990). “As an agent, he has a duty to deal in the principal’s interest… Moreover, he has a duty to give his principal information which is relevant to affairs entrusted to him of which he has notice.” Id. The fiduciary responsibilities of a broker to his customer are more specifically set out as follows:
    “(1) the duty to recommend a stock only after studying it sufficiently to become informed as to its nature, price, and financial prognosis; (2) the duty to carry out the customer’s orders promptly in a manner best suited to serve the customer’s interests; (3) the duty to inform the customer of the risks involved in purchasing or selling a particular security; (4) the duty to refrain from self-dealing or refusing to disclose any personal interest the broker may have in a particular recommended security; (5) the duty not to misrepresent any material fact to the transaction; and (6) the duty to transact business only after receiving prior authorization from the customer.”
    Lieb v. Merrill Lynch, Pierce, Fenner and Smith, 461 F.Supp. 951, 953 (E.D.Mich. 1978) (citations omitted).

    C. Negligence.

    As set out in Merrill Lynch, Pierce, Fenner & Smith v. Cheng, 697 F.Supp. 1224, 1227 (D.D.C. 1988): “It is clear from the case law that a stockbroker can be held liable to his client for negligence.” The Cheng court went on to state that although it did not find a private right of action based upon NASD rules, a violation of the NASD rules would be a “factor for consideration by the jury as to whether [the broker] acted as a ‘reasonable’ person in his conduct...” Id.
    D. Churning.

    Churning is a subset of federal securities fraud and is defined as follows by the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Fourth Circuit:
    “Churning occurs when a broker exercising control over the volume and frequency of trading, abuses his customer’s confidence for personal gain by initiating transactions that are excessive in view of the character of the account. Its hallmarks are disproportionate turnover, frequent in and out trading, and large brokerage commissions. It is a deceptive device made actionable by § 10(b) of the Securities Exchange Act and S.E.C. Rule 10b-5.”
    Carras v. Burns, 516 F.2d 251, 258 (4th Cir. 1973).
    The factors to be considered in a churning case are alternatively defined in the case of Bergen v. Rothschild, 648 F.Supp. 582, 585 (D.D.C. 1986):
    “(1) the number and frequency of the trades; (2) the amount of “in” and “out” trading; (3) the amount of commissions generated by the trading both in dollar terms and as a percentage of the brokers salary; (4) the investor’s objectives in the market and his level of business sophistication; and (5) the degree of control exercised by the securities dealers over the investment account.”
    (quoting Horne v. Francis I. du Pont & Co., 428 F.Supp. 1271, 1274 (D.D.C. 1977)).

    To establish control, “[t]he account need not be a discretionary account whereby the broker executes each trade without the consent of the client… [T]he requisite degree of control is met when the client routinely follows the recommendations of the broker.” Mihara v. Dean Witter & Co., Inc., 619 F.2d 814, 821 (9th Cir. 1980).

  13. #13
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Posts
    7

    www.Hhighbank-Partners.com

    INTERNATIONAL INVESTMENT FRAUD


    The investor information contained in this section was retrieved from the North American Securities Administrators Association, Inc ("NASAA").
    American investors, swept up in the overseas investment boom, would do well to temper their euphoria with the utmost caution since a new breed of con artists is cashing in on the rush to global investing. U.S.-based swindlers with bogus overseas investment schemes and high-pressure telephone "boiler room" sales operations located outside the United States will potentially defraud individual investors of billions of dollars during the 1990s.
    Complaints about overseas investment swindles involving precious metals, penny stocks, mining, coins, currency speculation, and special foreign banking instruments, such as certificates of deposit (CDs) with "sky-high, no risk" rates, are reported to state securities agencies and local Better Business Bureaus (BBBs) on a regular basis. Officials warn that the rise of off-shore boiler room operations will make it much more difficult, if not impossible, for investors to recover their funds and for law enforcement agencies to investigate and prosecute. Even mainstream foreign investments sometimes involve special risks and circumstances due to differing standards of marketplace regulation.
    Legitimate Overseas Investments
    North Americans are investing overseas in greater numbers and with more money than ever before. In part, this is a reflection of the fact that the international marketplace is becoming increasingly integrated and that international funds have made investing abroad easy. By the end of 1994, assets of U.S. managed international and global stock funds exceeded $160 billion -- with $40 billion invested in that year alone. Today, there are hundreds of funds divided into four categories: 1) Global funds that invest in both U.S. and foreign markets, 2) International funds that invest only outside the U.S., 3) Regional funds, and 4) Country funds.
    The number of foreign listings have also grown steadily on U.S. exchanges. By late 1996, the average daily volume of the New York Stock Exchange, for example, included some 12 percent each day from trading in non-U.S. securities. Chile was the fourth-largest contributor.
    Investors venturing overseas for the first time need to remember, however, that there are major risks involved. A strengthening dollar reduces the value of foreign investments owned by U.S. investors. A 20 percent drop in the value of a foreign currency relative to the U.S. dollar has the same impact as a 20 percent drop in that country's stock market prices. On the other hand, if the dollar weakens, foreign assets rise in value.
    Foreign governments could be overthrown -- touching off market declines -- or they could nationalize industries. In some countries, only a few hundred stocks trade in large quantities. This may result in exorbitant premiums not justified by the book value and fundamentals of the company involved.
    Although the trend is toward more open markets, major differences among national markets in procedures, practices, rules, and the threshold for fraudulent conditions can still trip up investors. For example, the Korean Stock Market, which is considered to be one of the least open in the world, bars nonresidents from owning South Korean stocks, except indirectly through nine trust funds. The Bogota (Columbia) Exchange has been identified by some law enforcement officials as a major front for many illegal operations, including the laundering of drug dollars. Investors who participated in Taiwan's 104 percent return in 1993 were disappointed when they tried to bring their capital home. The Taiwanese government imposed a three-month waiting period before capital could be repatriated.
    There also are sometimes differing views among nations about what are acceptable market activities. For example, the London Stock Exchange does not ban "bear raids" in which speculators try to drive down the price of a stock through short selling, a practice which is sharply limited under New York Stock Exchange Rules. In some countries, including Italy, Sweden, Belgium and Taiwan, there exist few prohibitions against insider trading. Malaysia, Greece and Kenya are among the nations with no government agency to safeguard the interests of investors and to guard against marketplace misconduct.
    These are among the issues and differences that regulators will grapple with as the world's marketplaces become even more tightly interwoven. Through NASAA, state securities agencies have taken a major role in the promotion of uniform registration requirements in the U.S. for foreign offerings and have joined in cooperative enforcement agreements in the international arena.
    Phony Overseas Investments
    Con artists are quick to pick up on the psychology of the investment climate and create "look alike" investment swindles that mirror "hot" investments in legitimate markets. During the worldwide oil crisis of the 1970s, scammers capitalized on the inclination of investors to dip their toes into the rising oil market by concocting oil and gas lease lottery application mills. After the "Black Monday" stock market crash of 1987, investment swindlers were quick to jump on investors' newfound distrust of paper investments by fashioning their own phony versions of tangible gold and mining investments, the so-called "dirt pile" scams that took an estimated $250 million from investors in 1988.
    Today, con artists see that U.S. investors are paying increasing attention to overseas investment opportunities. The new generation of scams have also "gone international." Most troubling is a growing pattern of former U.S. boiler room operators who have moved their telephone sales operations outside the U.S., frequently to Canada, Hong Kong, the Bahamas, Panama, Costa Rica, Europe, Liberia, and even South Africa. Some of these veteran con artists originally did their business in Florida and then moved on to southern California, hopscotching once again offshore. The locations of the boiler rooms are carefully chosen, with con artists dialing out of countries that have no extradition arrangements with U.S. law enforcement agencies.
    Protecting Yourself From International Securities Swindles
    What is true of all securities swindles -- that the best protection is to hang on to your money and not turn it over to a con artist -- is perhaps "truest" when it comes to international securities swindles. Enforcement efforts aimed at con men located overseas are extremely difficult and, in some cases, virtually impossible, due to poor relations between some nations and the absence of crucial enforcement mechanisms, such as extradition treaties. Here are some simple steps that investors can take to protect their interests:
    1. Don't be stampeded into the rush to international investing. If you listen to fellow investors and read the business news columns, it is easy to get the impression that everyone is investing overseas. But don't give in to the pressure to send your dollars overseas just to join the crowd. Make sure your investment is appropriate for your financial objectives and, in particular, your ability to assume risk.
    2. Learn something about foreign markets. How are investments regulated in the nation where you are thinking about sending your money? To what extent are investors in this market protected from investment fraud and abuse? What if you have to resolve some sort of dispute related to your investment? To what government agency would you go for assistance in resolving your problem?
    3. Remember: International isn't necessarily better. Even if investing overseas is one of the "hottest" activities going today for investors, it doesn't mean that the quality of the investment opportunities in other nations is any higher than those in the U.S. In fact, because of enforcement complications, the actual level of risk in overseas investments -- even in mainstream market products -- may be considerably higher than it is here, where markets are well regulated. (And once your money is gone, it may be impossible to recover, due to the practical difficulties involved in pursuing court action against foreign entities and individuals.) Keep your head on your shoulders when it comes to the hoopla about international investing.
    4. Consider U.S. investment alternatives that provide foreign exposure. Many American corporations listed on U.S. exchanges have large operations in foreign countries and get a significant portion of their revenue from sales overseas. Investing in the stocks and bonds of these companies, or in mutual funds made up of several of these companies, is one way to participate in the growth of foreign markets while keeping your dollars invested in U.S.-regulated corporations. The business reference section of the library is a good place to research these companies. Keep in mind that while these U.S. corporations may face stricter regulations than foreign firms, a company's earnings, and potentially its stock price, will still be affected by foreign currency fluctuations and political instability.
    5. Check with your state securities agency and BBB for complaints. If an investment is being sold to you, its promoter should be registered with your state securities agency. (For the number of your state's agency, call NASAA at 1-888-8-4-NASAA.) Ignore claims that overseas investment promoters are somehow exempt from state and federal securities law registration requirements -- they aren't. Also, take the time to inquire with your BBB about the company in question. It may have a record of customers' experiences with, or government actions against, the company.
    6. Keep in mind that if you are dealing with a stranger about something you can't check out with your own eyes... trouble may follow. Just because someone says that they have an oil well in Europe or a gold mine in South America does not mean that you have enough information on which to base an investment decision. Don't be deceived by slick-produced brochures that may make an enterprise look legitimate. If you don't have the contacts or financial resources to personally inspect your investment, consider carefully before giving up your money. In general, investors are best advised to deal with people they know and in investments they understand. If a stranger calls, pressuring you to invest "right away" in the huge profit potential of in Singapore options, think twice!
    Warning!!!!!!!!!Stay away from Morris Goldman, he is the devil and needs to go back to hell.

  14. #14
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Posts
    7

    www.Hhighbank-Partners.com

    INTERNATIONAL INVESTMENT FRAUD






    The investor information contained in this section was retrieved from the North American Securities Administrators Association, Inc ("NASAA").
    American investors, swept up in the overseas investment boom, would do well to temper their euphoria with the utmost caution since a new breed of con artists is cashing in on the rush to global investing. U.S.-based swindlers with bogus overseas investment schemes and high-pressure telephone "boiler room" sales operations located outside the United States will potentially defraud individual investors of billions of dollars during the 1990s.
    Complaints about overseas investment swindles involving precious metals, penny stocks, mining, coins, currency speculation, and special foreign banking instruments, such as certificates of deposit (CDs) with "sky-high, no risk" rates, are reported to state securities agencies and local Better Business Bureaus (BBBs) on a regular basis. Officials warn that the rise of off-shore boiler room operations will make it much more difficult, if not impossible, for investors to recover their funds and for law enforcement agencies to investigate and prosecute. Even mainstream foreign investments sometimes involve special risks and circumstances due to differing standards of marketplace regulation.
    Legitimate Overseas Investments
    North Americans are investing overseas in greater numbers and with more money than ever before. In part, this is a reflection of the fact that the international marketplace is becoming increasingly integrated and that international funds have made investing abroad easy. By the end of 1994, assets of U.S. managed international and global stock funds exceeded $160 billion -- with $40 billion invested in that year alone. Today, there are hundreds of funds divided into four categories: 1) Global funds that invest in both U.S. and foreign markets, 2) International funds that invest only outside the U.S., 3) Regional funds, and 4) Country funds.
    The number of foreign listings have also grown steadily on U.S. exchanges. By late 1996, the average daily volume of the New York Stock Exchange, for example, included some 12 percent each day from trading in non-U.S. securities. Chile was the fourth-largest contributor.
    Investors venturing overseas for the first time need to remember, however, that there are major risks involved. A strengthening dollar reduces the value of foreign investments owned by U.S. investors. A 20 percent drop in the value of a foreign currency relative to the U.S. dollar has the same impact as a 20 percent drop in that country's stock market prices. On the other hand, if the dollar weakens, foreign assets rise in value.
    Foreign governments could be overthrown -- touching off market declines -- or they could nationalize industries. In some countries, only a few hundred stocks trade in large quantities. This may result in exorbitant premiums not justified by the book value and fundamentals of the company involved.
    Although the trend is toward more open markets, major differences among national markets in procedures, practices, rules, and the threshold for fraudulent conditions can still trip up investors. For example, the Korean Stock Market, which is considered to be one of the least open in the world, bars nonresidents from owning South Korean stocks, except indirectly through nine trust funds. The Bogota (Columbia) Exchange has been identified by some law enforcement officials as a major front for many illegal operations, including the laundering of drug dollars. Investors who participated in Taiwan's 104 percent return in 1993 were disappointed when they tried to bring their capital home. The Taiwanese government imposed a three-month waiting period before capital could be repatriated.
    There also are sometimes differing views among nations about what are acceptable market activities. For example, the London Stock Exchange does not ban "bear raids" in which speculators try to drive down the price of a stock through short selling, a practice which is sharply limited under New York Stock Exchange Rules. In some countries, including Italy, Sweden, Belgium and Taiwan, there exist few prohibitions against insider trading. Malaysia, Greece and Kenya are among the nations with no government agency to safeguard the interests of investors and to guard against marketplace misconduct.
    These are among the issues and differences that regulators will grapple with as the world's marketplaces become even more tightly interwoven. Through NASAA, state securities agencies have taken a major role in the promotion of uniform registration requirements in the U.S. for foreign offerings and have joined in cooperative enforcement agreements in the international arena.
    Phony Overseas Investments
    Con artists are quick to pick up on the psychology of the investment climate and create "look alike" investment swindles that mirror "hot" investments in legitimate markets. During the worldwide oil crisis of the 1970s, scammers capitalized on the inclination of investors to dip their toes into the rising oil market by concocting oil and gas lease lottery application mills. After the "Black Monday" stock market crash of 1987, investment swindlers were quick to jump on investors' newfound distrust of paper investments by fashioning their own phony versions of tangible gold and mining investments, the so-called "dirt pile" scams that took an estimated $250 million from investors in 1988.
    Today, con artists see that U.S. investors are paying increasing attention to overseas investment opportunities. The new generation of scams have also "gone international." Most troubling is a growing pattern of former U.S. boiler room operators who have moved their telephone sales operations outside the U.S., frequently to Canada, Hong Kong, the Bahamas, Panama, Costa Rica, Europe, Liberia, and even South Africa. Some of these veteran con artists originally did their business in Florida and then moved on to southern California, hopscotching once again offshore. The locations of the boiler rooms are carefully chosen, with con artists dialing out of countries that have no extradition arrangements with U.S. law enforcement agencies.
    Protecting Yourself From International Securities Swindles
    What is true of all securities swindles -- that the best protection is to hang on to your money and not turn it over to a con artist -- is perhaps "truest" when it comes to international securities swindles. Enforcement efforts aimed at con men located overseas are extremely difficult and, in some cases, virtually impossible, due to poor relations between some nations and the absence of crucial enforcement mechanisms, such as extradition treaties. Here are some simple steps that investors can take to protect their interests:
    1. Don't be stampeded into the rush to international investing. If you listen to fellow investors and read the business news columns, it is easy to get the impression that everyone is investing overseas. But don't give in to the pressure to send your dollars overseas just to join the crowd. Make sure your investment is appropriate for your financial objectives and, in particular, your ability to assume risk.
    2. Learn something about foreign markets. How are investments regulated in the nation where you are thinking about sending your money? To what extent are investors in this market protected from investment fraud and abuse? What if you have to resolve some sort of dispute related to your investment? To what government agency would you go for assistance in resolving your problem?
    3. Remember: International isn't necessarily better. Even if investing overseas is one of the "hottest" activities going today for investors, it doesn't mean that the quality of the investment opportunities in other nations is any higher than those in the U.S. In fact, because of enforcement complications, the actual level of risk in overseas investments -- even in mainstream market products -- may be considerably higher than it is here, where markets are well regulated. (And once your money is gone, it may be impossible to recover, due to the practical difficulties involved in pursuing court action against foreign entities and individuals.) Keep your head on your shoulders when it comes to the hoopla about international investing.
    4. Consider U.S. investment alternatives that provide foreign exposure. Many American corporations listed on U.S. exchanges have large operations in foreign countries and get a significant portion of their revenue from sales overseas. Investing in the stocks and bonds of these companies, or in mutual funds made up of several of these companies, is one way to participate in the growth of foreign markets while keeping your dollars invested in U.S.-regulated corporations. The business reference section of the library is a good place to research these companies. Keep in mind that while these U.S. corporations may face stricter regulations than foreign firms, a company's earnings, and potentially its stock price, will still be affected by foreign currency fluctuations and political instability.
    5. Check with your state securities agency and BBB for complaints. If an investment is being sold to you, its promoter should be registered with your state securities agency. (For the number of your state's agency, call NASAA at 1-888-8-4-NASAA.) Ignore claims that overseas investment promoters are somehow exempt from state and federal securities law registration requirements -- they aren't. Also, take the time to inquire with your BBB about the company in question. It may have a record of customers' experiences with, or government actions against, the company.
    6. Keep in mind that if you are dealing with a stranger about something you can't check out with your own eyes... trouble may follow. Just because someone says that they have an oil well in Europe or a gold mine in South America does not mean that you have enough information on which to base an investment decision. Don't be deceived by slick-produced brochures that may make an enterprise look legitimate. If you don't have the contacts or financial resources to personally inspect your investment, consider carefully before giving up your money. In general, investors are best advised to deal with people they know and in investments they understand. If a stranger calls, pressuring you to invest "right away" in the huge profit potential of in Singapore options, think twice!
    Warning!!!!!!!!!Stay away from Morris Goldman, he is the devil and needs to go back to hell.


  15. #15
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Posts
    1

    Re: MLC Capital & friends - bad news

    Anyone have further dealings with Highbank & Partners or High Bank International???

    Names: Peter Davis, Morris Goldman???

  16. #16
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Posts
    2

    Re: MLC Capital & friends - bad news

    Monroe One Stop LLC et al v. Gold House Century 21 et al

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    Plaintiffs:Monroe One Stop, LLC and D & M Developers, LLC
    Defendants:Gold House Century 21, National Financial Group, High Bank and Partners, TLD Corporation, ACAPS Trust, ACAPS Joint Venture, LLC, Raj Shergill, Morris Goldman, Larry Marsella and Art Shelton
    Case Number:5:2009cv10501
    Filed:February 10, 2009
    Court:Michigan Eastern District Court
    Office:Ann Arbor Office [ Court Info ]
    County:Wayne
    Presiding Judge:script language="javascript">if (CMECF.MainMenu.createMenu && navigator.appVersion.indexOf("MSIE")==-1){win OMeara
    Referring Judge:script language="javascript">if (CMECF.MainMenu.createMenu && navigator.appVersion.indexOf("MSIE")==-1){win Morgan
    Nature of Suit:Other Statutes - Racketeer Influenced and Corrupt Organizations
    Cause:18:1964 Racketeering (RICO) Act
    Jurisdiction:Federal Question
    Jury Demanded By:Plaintiff
    Amount Demanded:$11,000,000.00

    Access additional case information on PACER

    Use the links below to access additional information about this case on the US Court's PACER system. A subscription to PACER is required.
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    Defendant: Gold House Century 21
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    Defendant: Morris Goldman
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    Defendant: Larry Marsella
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    Plaintiff: Monroe One Stop, LLC
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    Plaintiff: D & M Developers, LLC
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