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  1. #1
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    The sheeples banking scam flourishes toward collap


    ...Says a Retired Banker!

    September 11, 2011

    A retired banker describes simply, the world's Money Scam and the reason every country is now going bankrupt. Private banks have stolen the money creation process, and whereas once our money was created by the governments, debt-free, it is now created out of thin air and issued as debt with interest charges. In today's banker controlled world, money = debt, debt = slavery and therefore, money = slavery -- our monetary systems have become systems of enslavement.

    Money is created out of nothing, issued as debt, not enough money is created for the future interest payments and inflation steals our savings.

    The money creation process should be taken away from the banks and given to the governments who can create money debt-free, interest-free. This is how it used to be done and we needed no income taxes. Finally, it is explained what we should do to stop supporting the money scam.
    Yup but according to SOME people the world is A Okay!! All this is just conspiracy nuttiness.

  2. #2
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    Re: The sheeples banking scam flourishes toward co

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/United_...asury_security

    The U.S. government knew that the costs of World War I would be great, and the question of how to pay for the war was a matter of intense debate. The resulting decision was to pay for the war with a balance between higher taxes (see the War Tax Act) and government debt. Traditionally, the government borrowed from other countries, but there were no other countries from which to borrow in 1917: U.S. citizens would have to fully finance the war through both higher taxes and purchases of war bonds.[1]
    The Treasury raised ******* throughout the war by selling $21.5 billion in 'Liberty bonds.' These bonds were sold at subscription where officials created coupon price and then sold it at Par value. At this price, subscriptions could be filled in as little as one day, but usually remained open for several weeks, depending on demand for the bond.[1]
    After the war, the Liberty Bonds were reaching maturity, but the Treasury was unable to pay each down fully with only limited budget surpluses. The resolution to this problem was to refinance the debt with variable short and medium-term maturities. Again the Treasury issued debt through fixed-price subscription, where both the coupon and the price of the debt were dictated by the treasury.[1]
    The problems with debt issuance became apparent in the late-1920's. The system suffered from chronic oversubscription, where interest rates were so attractive that there were more purchasers of debt than supplied by the government. This indicated that the government was paying too much for debt. As government debt was undervalued, debt purchasers could buy from the government and immediately sell to another market participant at a higher price.[1]
    In 1929, the U.S. Treasury shifted from the fixed-price subscription system to a system of auctioning where 'Treasury Bills' would be sold to the highest bidder. Securities were then issued on a pro rata system where securities would be allocated to the highest bidder until their demand was full. If more treasuries were supplied by the government, they would then be allocated to the next highest bidder. This system allowed the market to set the price rather than the government. On December 10, 1929, the Treasury issued its first auction. The result was the issuing of $224 million three-month bills. The highest bid was at 99.310 with the lowest bid accepted at 99.152.[1]
    Foreign countries later started to buy U.S. debt as an investment of their surplus U.S. Dollars. There is fear that foreign countries hold so many bonds that if they stopped buying them, the U.S. economy would collapse; however, the reality is that more bonds are transferred in a single day by the Treasury than are held by any single sovereign state.[2] The perception of this dependence furthers belief that the U.S. and China economies are so tightly linked that both fear the consequences of a potential slow down in China's purchase of those bonds. In her 2010 visit to China, the U.S. Secretary of State Hillary Clinton called on authorities in Beijing to continue buying U.S. Treasuries, saying it would help jumpstart the flagging U.S. economy and stimulate imports of Chinese goods.[3]
    As the economic recession continues, more doubts arise over the real value of U.S. treasury securities. Though carefully worded, Chinese premier Wen Jia Bao's warning about possible devaluation of Chinese held U.S. bonds was taken very seriously by Washington:
    "Of course we are concerned about the safety of our assets. To be honest, I'm a little bit worried" ... "I would like to call on the United States to honor its words, stay a credible nation and ensure the safety of Chinese assets."[4] - Chinese premier, Wen Jiabao, said at a news conference after the closing of China's 2009 legislative session.
    However, it is important to note that such comments, while critical, were very likely indicative of Chinese "gesturing" ahead of the April 1st G-20 Economic Summit. As of April 2009, the U.S. dollar had rallied YTD against all other major world currencies. On March 18, 2009, the Federal Reserve used quantitative easing "to help improve conditions in private credit markets, the Committee decided to purchase up to $300 billion of longer-term Treasury securities over the next six months."[5]
    [edit]Marketable securities


    they never paid for anything, they just borrowed more money to make payments on what they already borrowed. the politician that stands up and says, "it's time for all of you to pay this debt!", is just tossed out of office and forgotten. people didn't want to pay then and don't want to pay now.

    the treasury does issue the money:

    http://www.treasurydirect.gov/indiv/...s/products.htm
    Last edited by mumbles; 10-13-2011 at 05:22 AM.

  3. #3
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    Re: The sheeples banking scam flourishes toward co

    Thank you for that Mumbles.
    You might want to know that you can trick the spellchecker by changing half of your word into italic print like Energy or funding in your case.

  4. #4
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    Re: The sheeples banking scam flourishes toward co

    or, perhaps i should have said, people couldn't pay then and can't pay now. it's like a mortgage, a working man can make the monthly payment, but never has enough to pay off the whole debt. it's still a good deal for him, because he has full use of the house, and eventually has equity.

  5. #5
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    Re: The sheeples banking scam flourishes toward co

    Quote Originally Posted by mumbles View Post
    or, perhaps i should have said, people couldn't pay then and can't pay now. it's like a mortgage, a working man can make the monthly payment, but never has enough to pay off the whole debt. it's still a good deal for him, because he has full use of the house, and eventually has equity.
    At least for a while there a man can feel free. LOL
    I often wonder if a house is not just another tool they can use to blackmail one into paying other stuff.

  6. #6
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    Re: The sheeples banking scam flourishes toward co

    Quote Originally Posted by eugene66 View Post
    At least for a while there a man can feel free. LOL
    I often wonder if a house is not just another tool they can use to blackmail one into paying other stuff.
    It is. Without fixed assets people don't bother dragging you to court. Straw men can be as guilty as hell but people only bother with people who has something they can take. Like money or a house.
    Once I thought I was wrong but I was mistaken.:yelcutelaughA:

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