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Thread: Is this a scam

  1. #1
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Posts
    1

    Is this a scam

    I have reviewed your resume and it seems like you would be a great asset to our company. There are 3 steps to the application process. You will have to pass all 3 to land the position. The first step is an IQ test, followed by a phone interview and finally an in-person interview. The IQ test will be completed online. I have personally selected 3 candidates for the receptionist position and only 1 will be accepted to join our company. After you complete the first step of the process please give me a day to get back to you with further instructions. Please fully complete the test. http://www.mb01.com/lnk.asp?o=3947&c=918271&a=81465
    Gary Robert

    click on the link

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Posts
    2,626

    Re: Is this a scam

    100% scam.

    There is no job.

    There is only a scammer trying to get you to sign up for that survey site using the affiliate link he provided. He only wanted the commission he would receive for getting people to sign up under him. After signing up, you will be bombarded with text, email, snail mail and phone spam trying to get you to sign up for more crap. That kind of "survey site" isn't about taking surveys for money, it is about buying gift cards and handing over your credit card number to sign up for trials on pay-to-use sites and merchandise sites. If you don't cancel within the correct amount of time, your credit card will be charged the full amount of the product or site fee. Then every month/quarter/year your credit card will be charged again and again.

    The "online IQ test" is probably one of those that wants your cell phone number to text you the results, when you enter your cell #, you are automatically signed up for a multiple charges of $9.99-49.99 a month, every month for as long as you have that cell number.

    After you had signed up for the survey site using the affiliate link, the next email from that scammer would have said something like: "sorry, the job is filled".

    Now that you have responded to a scammer, you are on his 'potential sucker' list, he will try again to separate you from your cash. He will send you more emails from his other free email addresses using another of his fake names with all kinds of stories of great jobs, lottery winnings, millions in the bank and desperate, lonely, sexy singles. He will sell you email address to all his scamming buddies who will also send you dozens of fake emails all with the exact same goal, you sending them your cash via Western Union or signing up at a site using the given affiliate link.

    You could post up the email address and the emails themselves that the scammer is using, it will help make your post more googlable for other suspicious potential victims to find when looking for information.

    Do you know how to check the header of a received email? If not, you could google for information. Being able to read the header to determine the geographic location an email originated from will help you weed out the most obvious scams and scammers. Then delete and block that scammer. Don't bother to tell him that you know he is a scammer, it isn't worth your effort. He has one job in life, convincing victims to send him their hard-earned cash.

    Whenever suspicious or just plain curious, google everything, website addresses, names used, companies mentioned, phone numbers given, all email addresses, even sentences from the emails as you might be unpleasantly surprised at what you find already posted online. You can also post/ask here and every scam-warner-anti-fraud-busting site you can find before taking a chance and losing money to a scammer.

    6 "Rules to follow" to avoid most fake jobs:
    1) Job asks to use your personal bank account and/or open a new one.
    2) Job asks you to print/mail/cash a check or money order.
    3) Job asks you to use Western Union or moneygram in any capacity.
    4) Job asks you to accept packages and re-ship them on to anyone.
    5) Job asks you to pay for visas, travel fees via Western Union or moneygram.
    6) Job asks you to sign up for a credit reporting, identity verification or survey site.

    Avoiding all jobs that mention any of the above listed 'red flags' and you will miss nearly all fake jobs. Only scammers ask you to do any of the above. No. Exceptions. Ever. For any reason.

    If you google "fake job credit report", "online IQ test cell phone charges scam" or something similar you will find hundreds of posts of victims and near victims of this type of scam.
    Found a scam or scammer's email address? Post it at scamwarners.com
    Found a romance scam? Post it at romancescam.com

  3. #3

    Re: Is this a scam

    Quote Originally Posted by Meri Widow View Post
    100% scam.

    There is no job.

    There is only a scammer trying to get you to sign up for that survey site using the affiliate link he provided. He only wanted the commission he would receive for getting people to sign up under him. After signing up, you will be bombarded with text, email, snail mail and phone spam trying to get you to sign up for more crap. That kind of "survey site" isn't about taking surveys for money, it is about buying gift cards and handing over your credit card number to sign up for trials on pay-to-use sites and merchandise sites. If you don't cancel within the correct amount of time, your credit card will be charged the full amount of the product or site fee. Then every month/quarter/year your credit card will be charged again and again.

    The "online IQ test" is probably one of those that wants your cell phone number to text you the results, when you enter your cell #, you are automatically signed up for a multiple charges of $9.99-49.99 a month, every month for as long as you have that cell number.

    After you had signed up for the survey site using the affiliate link, the next email from that scammer would have said something like: "sorry, the job is filled".

    Now that you have responded to a scammer, you are on his 'potential sucker' list, he will try again to separate you from your cash. He will send you more emails from his other free email addresses using another of his fake names with all kinds of stories of great jobs, lottery winnings, millions in the bank and desperate, lonely, sexy singles. He will sell you email address to all his scamming buddies who will also send you dozens of fake emails all with the exact same goal, you sending them your cash via Western Union or signing up at a site using the given affiliate link.

    You could post up the email address and the emails themselves that the scammer is using, it will help make your post more googlable for other suspicious potential victims to find when looking for information.

    Do you know how to check the header of a received email? If not, you could google for information. Being able to read the header to determine the geographic location an email originated from will help you weed out the most obvious scams and scammers. Then delete and block that scammer. Don't bother to tell him that you know he is a scammer, it isn't worth your effort. He has one job in life, convincing victims to send him their hard-earned cash.

    Whenever suspicious or just plain curious, google everything, website addresses, names used, companies mentioned, phone numbers given, all email addresses, even sentences from the emails as you might be unpleasantly surprised at what you find already posted online. You can also post/ask here and every scam-warner-anti-fraud-busting site you can find before taking a chance and losing money to a scammer.

    6 "Rules to follow" to avoid most fake jobs:
    1) Job asks to use your personal bank account and/or open a new one.
    2) Job asks you to print/mail/cash a check or money order.
    3) Job asks you to use Western Union or moneygram in any capacity.
    4) Job asks you to accept packages and re-ship them on to anyone.
    5) Job asks you to pay for visas, travel fees via Western Union or moneygram.
    6) Job asks you to sign up for a credit reporting, identity verification or survey site.

    Avoiding all jobs that mention any of the above listed 'red flags' and you will miss nearly all fake jobs. Only scammers ask you to do any of the above. No. Exceptions. Ever. For any reason.

    If you google "fake job credit report", "online IQ test cell phone charges scam" or something similar you will find hundreds of posts of victims and near victims of this type of scam.
    You are absolutely right...the worst part is that I had replied to a posting on *****list for a receptionist job and that same e-mail was sent to me.

  4. #4

    Re: Is this a scam

    I know people who have fallen for this scam. It's unfortunate that the unemployed are being preyed on, especially in this economy.

  5. #5

    Re: Is this a scam

    "I have reviewed your resume and it seems like you would be a great asset to our company. There are 3 steps to the application process. You will have to pass all 3 to land the position. The first step is an IQ test, followed by a phone interview and finally an in-person interview. The IQ test will be completed online. I have personally selected 3 candidates for the receptionist position and only 1 will be accepted to join our company. After you complete the first step of the process please give me a day to get back to you with further instructions. Please fully complete the test. http://www.mb01.com/lnk.asp?o=3947&c=918271&a=81465 Gary Robert"

    Total scam!!! My cell is getting bombarded with crap from this dude!!! Don't fall for this guys BS

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    Columbus, Ohio...hoping for somewhere without Winters in the next 5 years.
    Posts
    240

    Re: Is this a scam

    I've been getting the same emails lately. It appears this is becoming a growing trend.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Posts
    7,767

    Re: Is this a scam

    the link leads to

    http://www.surveypanelgroup.com/home.php?lp=1&al=1&s=0

    if it is an honest business, they should close the account of the person placing the false ads.

    if it's not an honest business then everybody should avoid them.


    Registrant:
    Trancos, Inc.
    6800 Koll Center Parkway
    Suite 170
    Pleasanton, CA 94566
    US

    Domain Name: SURVEYPANELGROUP.COM

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jan 2014
    Posts
    453

    Re: Is this a scam

    Lol what is the IQ test all about? That is not the way to go. I am not sure any company would do that.

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