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Thread: Used Car Scams

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Location
    Curacao
    Posts
    9

    Used Car Scams

    We'll Payoff Your Loan OR Lease No Matter What You Still Owe!

    You see and hear these ads on the radio and newspaper all the time. Nothing in life magically disappears. You can't just get rid of a lease or it's contract. When you break leases the penalties are stiff, may even cost thousands. They do get you out of your current lease, but these payoff penalties are paid first right off the top. They are not doing anything at all for you except the paperwork, they just want your trade in so they can give you far below market value for it, while selling you a new car at a very high profit.

    Then they resell your trade in for a higher price. Here’s how the scam works: If you are upside down on your car loan and you still owe $8,000 for it, the dealer pays off your loan, then you owe that $8,000 to the dealer. This gets financed along with the $15,000 car you are buying, now you are financing 2 cars for $22,000! It's just fancy math, penalties, and scams.
    Last edited by geo®ge; 06-21-2004 at 02:25 PM.

  2. #2

    Car Leasing Service Scam

    I found this site trying to find some information about what I think is a scam. One of my co-workers got a promotion about 6 months ago to a field based job, which provided a company car. She already had a nice SUV, but the company would only allow her to use their cars rather than give her an allowance. Because the car was worth less at that point than the payments left on the car, she was hesitant to sell it because she would basically be losing money. She put an ad on Craigslist (a community type site that a lot of people use to sell thing, etc.) and someone wrote back to her about a company that leases used cars to people with bad credit, who can't get a car loan, but can afford to pay the payments. To make a long story short, she ended up getting into the program, had contracts signed by both her and the business owner and had the contact information of all parties involved. The contract also stated that the company would pay any payments if the customer could not and that they would get the car back as well.

    Now for the interesting part, The company ends up going out of business...

    So, now my friend has been trying to get her SUV back for about 4 months and the person who has it has been driving allover the country (LA, Vegas, Chicago) and getting tickets in every city. He stopped paying the insurance, payments and tickets. She has gone to the police, but they said that they can not do anything because he did not technically "steal" the car. She willfully gave him the keys. So now she is paying car insurance and tickets for a car that she doesn't even drive. The person who has the car has shut off all phone lines, etc. and now she cannot get in touch with him. She thought about trying to find the car herself (around the place where he gets most of the tickets), however she is scared to try to get the car back herself ( although she does have a key)

    I think that there is a good chance that the business owner and the car leaser may be connected and that there may also be other people that this happened to.

    If you have any ideas on how to proceed, please send me an e-mail at [email protected]

    Thanks.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Posts
    1

    How can you tell if a California title is fake?

    Or if it is real, how can you make sure it isn't sold without consent from the owner?

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Posts
    1

    Re: How can you tell if a California title is fake?

    Best thing to do is to take the VIN# to the tax office or title transfer office to run it. Id also Google the VIN to see if shows up in any ads.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Posts
    1

    Language Barrier

    I'm trying to figure out if I should take very much action on this so I'm looking for some advice. I may even be posting in the wrong place but I thought it was worth a shot.

    Here's the deal. We (my husband and I) are in the market for a used car and found one at a dealership that we are interested in. We have done all of our research (value, carfax etc) and I took it in Saturday to a mechanic to have it checked out. However, the dealership instisted that the salesman come with me to the mechanic. Since I'm still learning this car-buying process I didn't quite understand why until later. I had my daughter with me so I was a little slower in getting inside. However, the salesman rushed to the counter ahead of me and immediately began speaking in Spanish to the mechanic. At first I didn't think anything of it since we live in a part of the U.S. where the predominant language is Spanish. I noticed that the mechanic immediately started addressing me in English with an almost concered look on his face and thought that was strange but didn't really think much of it. Later, when it appeared that the car was nearly completed, the salesperson stood at the door tapping his foot, and asking me how I found out about the mechanic. I told him that he had good reviews on the internet and he said nervously "I'll have to tell him that I'll refer business to him, in fact, I started telling him that earlier." Thankfully the mechanic bypassed the salesman and went directly to the counter and only addressed me.

    Like I said, I didn't think anything of it at the time until later when I put it all together and realized that the salesman was trying to make a deal with the mechanic in Spanish when we first arrived to get him to go easy on the inspection. At least, I'm 99% certain that was what he was doing since he even confessed that he was trying to tell the mechanic that he would send him customers. Why would he have done that in Spanish unless he didn't want me to know? Thankfully the mechanic didn't go for it, which is why he immediatly addressed me in English, but if he had been a sleezy mechanic and made a deal with the salesman and didn't give me an accurate inspection report then we may never have known that the tires are completely dry and cracked inside, driven on them and been in an accident from a blown tire. In addition, right after hearing the inspection, when we were standing outside the salesman tried to convince me that he looked at the tires and they looked fine. Of course I'm going to believe a mechanic over a sleezy salesman. Who does he think I am?

    Anyway, we still haven't decided whether or not to buy the vehicle. We aren't going to deal with this salesman any longer since we have lost all trust in him (not that there was much there to begin with), but I feel that I should take some type of further action on this. I know that dealers have a lot of shady practices but there should be some sort of protection for buyers against a dealer trying to make a deal with the mechanic. I'm going to write a letter to the owner of the dealerships (this is a used car lot attached to a new car lot) but I wonder if it is worth taking it farther? In my mind this seems to be a big deal, but maybe I'm blowing it out of proportion.

    Thankfully I've learned some things. Never let the salesman talk to your mechanic and keep a close eye on him/her to make sure they aren't making a deal with them. Also, I will never let the salesperson be present when the inspection is being read.

    Thank you to anyone who can help!
    A

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Posts
    811

    Re: Language Barrier

    Quote Originally Posted by derby
    Here's the deal. We (my husband and I) are in the market for a used car and found one at a dealership that we are interested in. We have done all of our research (value, carfax etc) and I took it in Saturday to a mechanic to have it checked out.
    GOOD JOB! Taking it to a mechanic is not only wise, but you are getting a "2nd opinon" on the condition of the car. Any car that is only checked by a stealership must always be given a 2nd over by a qualified mechanic. same if you were doing a private sell/buy.

    However, the dealership instisted that the salesman come with me to the mechanic. Since I'm still learning this car-buying process I didn't quite understand why until later.
    Not at all odd. YOu are taking a car of theirs off their lot. They need someoen authorized to go with you so that you dont "make off" with their car.

    I had my daughter with me so I was a little slower in getting inside. However, the salesman rushed to the counter ahead of me and immediately began speaking in Spanish to the mechanic. At first I didn't think anything of it since we live in a part of the U.S. where the predominant language is Spanish. I noticed that the mechanic immediately started addressing me in English with an almost concered look on his face and thought that was strange but didn't really think much of it. Later, when it appeared that the car was nearly completed, the salesperson stood at the door tapping his foot, and asking me how I found out about the mechanic. I told him that he had good reviews on the internet and he said nervously "I'll have to tell him that I'll refer business to him, in fact, I started telling him that earlier." Thankfully the mechanic bypassed the salesman and went directly to the counter and only addressed me.
    Odd, but lets see how it plays out.

    Like I said, I didn't think anything of it at the time until later when I put it all together and realized that the salesman was trying to make a deal with the mechanic in Spanish when we first arrived to get him to go easy on the inspection. At least, I'm 99% certain that was what he was doing since he even confessed that he was trying to tell the mechanic that he would send him customers. Why would he have done that in Spanish unless he didn't want me to know? Thankfully the mechanic didn't go for it, which is why he immediatly addressed me in English, but if he had been a sleezy mechanic and made a deal with the salesman and didn't give me an accurate inspection report then we may never have known that the tires are completely dry and cracked inside, driven on them and been in an accident from a blown tire.
    ahh. I see. Yes it would seem a little questionable. If you aren't comfortable with the mechanic';s opinion after your intial once over by him, nothing prevents you to take it to another mechanic for another opinon.

    My advice however is that you and your husband should have been together to take the car down so that one person can take care of your child while the other goes into the mechanics office with the salesperson. Or find a babysitter to leave yoru child with since you should be worry about your car sale than your child.

    In addition, right after hearing the inspection, when we were standing outside the salesman tried to convince me that he looked at the tires and they looked fine. Of course I'm going to believe a mechanic over a sleezy salesman. Who does he think I am?
    Remember, the less they spend on tring to fix a car, the more they can make on the sale. used cars are treasures to stealerships than new cars are.

    Anyway, we still haven't decided whether or not to buy the vehicle. We aren't going to deal with this salesman any longer since we have lost all trust in him (not that there was much there to begin with), but I feel that I should take some type of further action on this.
    Unfortunately, there is nothing you can do but to voice your concern to the stealership's sales manager, and move onto another stealership or to someone selling their vehicle privately. Maybe making a complaint to the sale manager will help in your obtaining the vehicle, and also get a chance to make a noather inspection with another mechanic in your area.


    I know that dealers have a lot of shady practices but there should be some sort of protection for buyers against a dealer trying to make a deal with the mechanic.
    nothing can be done unless the mechanic says something to effect that the salemans was trying to "Rip you off" , however if you have nothing on the part of the mechanic's statement, the best you can do is to voice your concern to the stealership's management, move on, or work with the sales manager instead of that salesman. Remember, its the manager that determiens the sale price, and if you deal directly with them, the better.

    I'm going to write a letter to the owner of the dealerships (this is a used car lot attached to a new car lot) but I wonder if it is worth taking it farther? In my mind this seems to be a big deal, but maybe I'm blowing it out of proportion.

    Thankfully I've learned some things. Never let the salesman talk to your mechanic and keep a close eye on him/her to make sure they aren't making a deal with them. Also, I will never let the salesperson be present when the inspection is being read
    nothing hurts you if you go ahead and write a letter of concern over the actiosn of the salesman in this siutation. That you were unhappy with his service, and that you are now leary about buying the vehicle you were interested in, because he spoke with the mechanic you took the vehicle to prior to you being abl to do so. That alone makes you question the inspection, and that you wish to hae another inspection done by another mechanic, or you are just going to look eleswhere.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Location
    Texas
    Posts
    1

    Rush Hour

    I went with my mother last week to buy a car. Sure we got a pretty good deal, but has anyone heard of a company named Rush Hour. They are supposed to be a promotional company. The banks own the cars, The promotion company sells the cars at a dealers lot for a week for reduced prices, then they move on to another city or state and do the same thing. One of the people who work for the company offered me a job. I can't seem to find anything out about them on the web and I just want to know if they a legit. They claim that there is alot of money to be made and that all sales moneys are split as a group effort and not on the individual bases. I'd like to try this out but not without getting an outsiders view on the situation. I hope that someone has heard of the company and can help me! Thanks to all

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Posts
    3,120

    Re: Rush Hour

    Do you have any sales experience? Selling cars is not easy. But if it costs you nothing you might just as well get an experience.

    There is another problem. Most car repos are probably sold through public auctions. Thats why, just like you I would want some contact from banks that would confirm that Rush Hour is legal. I would be suspicious if they refuse to provide any bank contact or any web reference or at least verifiable address of the office.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Posts
    2

    Suspicious carfax report, anyone saw this before?

    Hi,

    I'm searching for a car on craigslist, and found a good one at a good price (like 2/3 of the KBB price). I call the seller (which is a dealer) to ask for the VIN number and he gave me one. When I go to carfax.com to get a report for that VIN, it only has one report that looks like this:


    10/26/2006 Dealer Inventory Vehicle offered for sale


    I've ran carfax check many times, and never see a "one entry only" report like this. At least a normal carfax report would tell you when the car was sold to the first customer, or when the car has a new owner.

    I'm suspecting that the car has a bad history, and somehow the dealer made up a new VIN for it and report to carfax. Seems like the real history of the car has been covered.

    Did anyone ever have similar experience to this and would like to share your experience or your thoughts?

    Thanks,
    A-car-buyer

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Posts
    1

    Suburban Band & trust cashiers check

    If you get check for your car for more money than you were asking for, please call the bank and check if its real or not. I got one and it was a fraudulent check. It's a green check, with a signature with a B and a G.

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Posts
    2

    Re: Suspicious carfax report, anyone saw this before?

    Noone's ever seen such a carfax report???

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Posts
    1

    Toby Ufie Brooklyn Car Scam

    Toby Ufie is a fat little gypsy who stops you and offers to do body work on your car for $150. By the times he's finished with you you've given him $1000 cash up front. No work has been done -- "he has to order parts." And he's stripped your car of its guts -- motor, regulator, nuts, bolts, belts -- you name it. He has no shop. He operates on the street -- Union and 8th Avenue in Park Slope is a favorite spot. Beverly Road and Coney Island Avenue or Beverly and Flatbush Avenue are two others. Don't be taken in. He drives around in an old grey car California license plate 5VRP104. Don't be suckered like I was.

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Posts
    14

    Online Car auctions? Scam or not

    Googles has multiple ads for Online Car auctions where you pay to join the website and your supposed to get unlimited access to there car auctions. They say things like 90% off retail value and cars as low as $100.

    Is this real or a scam?

  14. #14
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    USA
    Posts
    119

    Re: Online Car auctions? Scam or not

    Let's just say that it is "questionable" and that there is no free lunch.

    Be aware of people claiming the car is overseas and will ship it for free.

  15. #15
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Posts
    14

    Re: Online Car auctions? Scam or not

    I think some of those Online Car Auctions are in the USA

    They have you sign up for like $34 to be a member and your supposed to get access to car auctions.

    But i have a feeling you can get this access for free. Kinda like those Satellite on TV products and survey companies.

  16. #16
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Posts
    2

    Re: Toby Ufie Brooklyn Car Scam

    that fat **** put me threw a living hell. hes a fat gypsy who claims to be italian. i bought a car off him for $500 and he didnt get me the title for almost 6 months! i had to pay almost $500 more i had to do a salvage title tons of headache all for a hooptie. i wish i could post a pic of that piece of garbage. i think his # is 347-489-9764 or 9674 if anyone cares to prank him TOBY UFIE a true waste of life.

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