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  1. #1
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    Gambling on a Weaker Dollar

    Editorial
    Gambling on a Weaker Dollar

    For some time now, shortsighted lawmakers in Congress have been threatening China with tariffs for what they call its unfair currency practices. The Bush administration, to its credit, has generally resisted the protectionist rant, most notably by refusing to brand China a "currency manipulator" in an official report to Congress last week.

    China responded to the administration's responsible policy and diplomatic courtesy this week when it loosened, a bit, the tether that binds the Chinese currency, the yuan, to the dollar. A stronger yuan implies a weaker dollar, as does the general strengthening so far this year of the euro and the yen. By making foreign goods sold here more expensive and American goods sold abroad cheaper, a weaker dollar would, in theory, eventually help reduce the United States' huge trade gap.

    The problem is this: unless a falling dollar is paired with reductions in the federal budget deficit, it could do more harm than good by driving up interest rates, perhaps sharply. That's because the foreign investors who finance the administration's "borrow as you go" budget are likely to demand higher returns to invest in a depreciating dollar.

    But if budget deficits declined over the long run, the government's reduced need to borrow would help keep interest rates low as the dollar depreciated. Then, after a lag, the falling dollar would shrink the trade deficit without risking big increases in interest rates in the process.

    Unfortunately, the incessant tax cutting of the past five years precludes any serious attempt to reduce the budget deficit. So to keep interest rates in check as the dollar falls, the administration would have to persuade investors not to believe what they see: a dollar that is declining even as the United States does nothing to curb its borrowing.

    That would be a difficult trick even for a Treasury Department that commanded respect. It will be especially difficult for Mr. Bush's Treasury team, which has suffered a diminution of esteem and credibility.

    The Bush tax cuts also make it harder for Americans as a nation to bail themselves out of the trade deficit by saving more. Higher personal savings would allow the government to finance its budget deficit without outsized foreign borrowing — another safe route to a cheaper dollar and a smaller trade gap. But the Republicans who control Congress let a tax credit for low-income savers expire this year to free up room in the budget for nearly $70 billion in additional tax cuts for high-income Americans over the near term.

    That tax cut bill, signed into law this week by President Bush, also commits an estimated $53 billion through the middle of the century to help those same high earners shift their existing savings into tax shelters. This adds not one cent of new savings and presages big deficits far into the future.

    A weakening dollar, on top of intractable budget deficits and a chronic savings shortfall, is a recipe for recession. The question now is whether the country will change direction in time. The portents are not good

    .

  2. #2
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    Re: Gambling on a Weaker Dollar

    Recession is coming. It's not a question of "if" but of when.

    I work in retail. We had some big jumps in the wholesale price of candy, gum, and HBA, otherwise known as health and beauty aids. Of course we passed it on.

    See more denied credit in the stores, and more people asking and then not buying.

    Head office cracking down on O.T., often at the expense of getting much needed work done.

    I'm really thinking about quitting at the end of the summer and heading for the hills. I have no debt, have some money and assets, and might make more sense to ride the next couple of years out in a small town rebuilding old bikes.

    What's really scary is that all of my global and overseas investments are going great. Domestic side is completely stagnant. It's bad when a small investor like me is going to abandon anything domestic.

  3. #3
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    Re: Gambling on a Weaker Dollar

    Great article Sojustask. Do you think grim will grasp the meaning of this or will he interpret this as being more good economic news?

    Rusted..you are so correct. I work in foodservice and I can tell you that the cost of supplies have risen significantly over the past year. So much of what we use is tied into energy costs. As the price of gas rises, it affects everthing from the cost of plastics, the cost of processing paper, delivery costs all along the distribution system. There is nothing that is going to prevent wholesale prices from rising. Either retail prices are going to rise or else cuts will be made in other areas such as labor, credit costs, portion sizes or profits. Have you noticed how sizes have decreased in some products?

  4. #4
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    Re: Gambling on a Weaker Dollar

    On a related note:

    Iran, as expected for a long time now, has reportedly announced that it will switch from the dollar to the euro as accepted payment for oil and gas exports.

  5. #5
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    Re: Gambling on a Weaker Dollar

    Quote Originally Posted by bairdi
    Do you think grim will grasp the meaning of this or will he interpret this as being more good economic news?
    I think I would like to have the link to the source of that editorial.

    I think I would also like to point out that the governments deficit from 2004 to 2005, shrunk by 100 billion dollars. Show me where these people that write these editorials that lady mod likes to post, predicted that the deficit was going to shrink like it did in 2005. If you can show me that, then maybe these people's opinions can be given some credibility. But, if their predictions haven't been accurate in the past 3 years or so, why should we now believe they have a clue about the future of America's economy?

    Can anyone say "Partisan politics?"

    I knew you could...

    .

  6. #6
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    Re: Gambling on a Weaker Dollar

    Weakening dollar will have varied U.S. effects
    By Eileen Alt Powell

    The Associated Press

    NEW YORK — The anxiety over inflation that riled the markets in recent days is just one of the risks Wall Street investors are contending with. Next up, depreciation of the dollar.

    After showing surprising strength through 2005, the U.S. dollar has been weakening this year. The decline has picked up momentum since April 21, when the Group of Seven industrialized nations made it clear they wanted Asian countries to allow their currencies to strengthen to help reduce their growing trade surpluses with the rest of the world.

    Experts expect the dollar to further depreciate this year, especially against the Japanese yen and other Asian currencies. A weakening dollar doesn't bode well for long-term bonds, making them less attractive to foreign investors. But it could begin to whittle away at the huge imbalances that have built up in U.S. trade accounts — and that will be a plus for the U.S. economy and the markets.

    The good news is that almost no one sees a dollar crisis but, instead, an "orderly" retrenchment.

    Mark Zandi, chief economist with Economy.com, pointed out that most of America's trade problems have been with Asia in general and China in particular. The United States ran up a record trade deficit of $726 billion last year — $202 billion of it with China.

    "The Chinese currency is massively undervalued, probably by as much as 30 percent," Zandi said. He predicted China would let its currency appreciate against the dollar "by about 5 percent per year over the next five or six years." Japan and the rest of Asia will follow along, he added.

    The depreciation of the dollar will make U.S.-made products more competitive abroad, boosting the nation's exports. At the same time, it should make imports more expensive, reducing demand for them and narrowing the trade deficit although those costlier imports could also mean higher inflation at home.

    The dollar also is losing some of its sparkle because the economies in Europe and Japan are beginning to show growth that again will make them attractive to foreign investors, said David Gilmore, a partner at Foreign Exchange Analytics. And it comes as foreigners are getting wary of putting more money into the United States.

    "The rest of the world is willing to lend to you as long as they believe the story is they'll get their money back and a decent rate of return," he said. "But the [American] private sector and public sector have kept digging themselves into a hole."

    He noted that the national savings rate is negative, while the federal government's debt and the trade deficit keep growing.


    "The currency market is anticipating that foreigners are going to grow worried about the debt the U.S. is accumulating," Gilmore said. "Eventually, they'll demand higher levels of return ... and that will force interest rates higher."

    Higher rates can hurt bond investors and slow the economy, which can reduce returns in the equity market, he said.

    Some investors already are positioning themselves for that eventuality. The closely watched Berkshire Hathaway chief, Warren Buffett, has been buying more foreign stocks since late last year and, in recent weeks, has begun buying foreign companies.

    Zandi said smaller investors can also look abroad for better returns.

    "If you want to benefit from the falling dollar, you want to be invested in Asia, either through stocks or mutual funds," Zandi said.

    Henry McVey, an analyst with Morgan Stanley Research, said in a research note this past week that although the dollar remains "the world's central currency," it's likely to be buffeted as the Federal Reserve pauses in its drive to push interest rates higher at the same time Europe and Japan are likely to begin boosting their interest rates.

    Morgan Stanley estimates that S&P 500 companies derived more than one-quarter of their sales overseas in 2005; the top 25 companies by capitalization generated some 43 percent of sales overseas. Those companies should benefit from the weaker dollar, he said.

    ******************************
    Kerry AGM hears warning on dollar

    May 19, 2006 19:36

    Shares in food group Kerry tumbled in Dublin this afternoon following comments from chief executive Hugh Friel at the group's AGM in Tralee, Co Kerry.

    Mr Friel told shareholders the weakening dollar and high raw materials prices could prevent it from reaching its earnings targets this year. He told the meeting that the group's business were performing ahead of last year so far.

    Mr Friel added that Kerry was continuing to look for bolt-on acquisitions, following its recent purchase of two North American food ingredients businesses, Custom Industries and Nuvex.


    Shares in Kerry closed down €1.47 at €18 in Dublin.

  7. #7
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    Re: Gambling on a Weaker Dollar

    Gold Gains in London Trading as Weakening Dollar Spurs Buying

    May 18 (Bloomberg) -- Gold gained in London as a decline in the dollar against currencies including the euro spurred investors to buy the metal as an alternative investment to U.S. stocks and bonds.

    The U.S. currency fell against the euro as European Union Monetary Affairs Commissioner Joaquin Almunia said the single currency's 7.9 gain this year won't derail growth in the region. Gold has climbed 33 percent this year, peaking at a 26-year high last week. It fell the most since 1993 on May 15.

    ``Dollar weakness may be the catalyst for a move higher,'' Frederic Panizzutti, a senior vice president at MKS Finance, a Geneva-based precious-metals trading and refining company, said in an interview today. ``Pension funds, money managers and funds are still interested in buying gold as a balance in their portfolio.''

    Gold for immediate delivery rose as much as $5.60, or 0.8 percent, to $692.70 an ounce. Bullion traded at $687.20 as of 12:37 p.m. in London. It earlier fell as low as $679.13.

    The dollar traded at $1.2779, from $1.2743 last night in New York.

    Bullion fell 5.2 percent on May 15 on speculation that a rally that had driven metals including copper, platinum and zinc to a record this year was exaggerated.

    ``The price of gold has fallen from $730 an ounce on 12 May to $679 today: this may signal only a pause in the metal's recent appeal, or a more worrying trend following its increasing popularity in recent years,'' Jonathan Bell, chief investment officer at London-based Stanhope Capital Inc., said in an e- mailed statement today.

    Gold may trade between $670 and $700 for the remainder of the week, Panizzutti forecast.

    Jewelry Demand

    The surge in gold prices is affecting jewelers, the biggest users of the metal. Bulgari SpA, the world's third-largest jeweler, plans to raise prices by as much as 5 percent for its jewelry and watches to reflect higher gold prices.

    Among other precious metals for immediate delivery in London, silver fell 3 cents to $13.16 an ounce, platinum gained $12 to $1,321.50 and palladium rose $3 to $374.50.

    Platinum, which is used in jewelry and electronics, is ``a relative safe haven within the metals environment,'' John Reade, an analyst with London-based UBS AG, said in a report today. Platinum supplies won't be big enough to meet demand and stockpiles of the metal ``are relatively low,'' he said.

  8. #8
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    Re: Gambling on a Weaker Dollar

    i think a good place for grim to read about the "real economy" would be 'gold eagle editorials'.do google search.as the chinese and the yuan/vrs dollar fight.the U.S. has flexed it's control to insure a dramatic increase in commodity prices to pressure the chinese into floating the yuan!?and i have to note this thread must be in part due to lady mods own business interests!?good i hope!?hehe!!

  9. #9
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    Re: Gambling on a Weaker Dollar

    Strong Dollar, Weak Dollar:
    Foreign Exchange Rates and the U.S. Economy


    http://www.chicagofed.org/consumer_i...eak_dollar.cfm

    How does the dollar's value in other countries help or hinder the U.S. economy?
    How can the value of the dollar be both good and bad for Americans at the same time?
    What causes the dollar's value in other countries to change?
    Where is the international currency market and how does it operate?



    Strong is good. Weak is bad. These generalizations sound simple enough, but they can be confusing when talking about money. Is a "strong" U.S. dollar always good? Is a "weak" dollar always bad? This publication explores how the U.S. dollar and foreign currencies affect each other and how their interaction affects you and the economy.

    Understanding Foreign Exchange

    The te.rms strong and weak, rising and falling, strengthening and weakening are relative te.rms in the world of foreign exchange (sometimes referred to as "forex"). Rising and falling, strengthening and weakening all indicate a relative change in position from a previous level. When the dollar is "strengthening," its value is rising in relation to one or more other currencies. A strong dollar will buy more units of a foreign currency than previously. One result of a stronger dollar is that the prices of foreign goods and services drop for U.S. consumers. This may allow Americans to take the long-postponed vacation to another country, or buy a foreign car that used to be too expensive.

    U.S. consumers benefit from a strong dollar, but U.S. exporters are hurt. A strong dollar means that it takes more of a foreign currency to buy U.S. dollars. U.S. goods and services become more expensive for foreign consumers who, as a result, tend to buy fewer U.S. products. Because it takes more of a foreign currency to purchase strong dollars, products priced in dollars are more expensive when sold overseas.

    Strengthening Dollar

    Advantages

    .Consumer sees lower prices on foreign products/services.
    .Lower prices on foreign products/services help keep inflation low.
    .U.S. consumers benefit when they travel to foreign countries.
    .U.S. investors can purchase foreign stocks/bonds at "lower" prices.

    Disadvantages

    .U.S. firms find it harder to compete in foreign markets.
    .U.S. firms must compete with lower priced foreign goods.
    .Foreign tourists find it more expensive to visit U.S.
    .More difficult for foreign investors to provide capital to U.S. in times of heavy U.S. borrowing.

    Weakening Dollar

    Advantages

    .U.S. firms find it easier to sell goods in foreign markets.
    .U.S. firms find less competitive pressure to keep prices low.
    .More foreign tourists can afford to visit the U.S.
    .U.S. capital markets become more attractive to foreign investors.

    Disadvantages

    .Consumers face higher prices on foreign products/services.
    .Higher prices on foreign products contribute to higher cost-of-living.
    .U.S. consumers find traveling abroad more costly.
    .Harder for U.S. firms and investors to expand into foreign markets.

    A weak dollar also hurts some people and benefits others. When the value of the dollar falls or weakens in relation to another currency, prices of goods and services from that country rise for U.S. consumers. It takes more dollars to purchase the same amount of foreign currency to buy goods and services. That means U.S. consumers and U.S. companies that import products have reduced purchasing power.

    At the same time, a weak dollar means prices for U.S. products fall in foreign markets, benefiting U.S. exporters and foreign consumers. With a weak dollar, it takes fewer units of foreign currency to buy the right amount of dollars to purchase U.S. goods. As a result, consumers in other countries can buy U.S. products with less money.

    Ideally, the dollar and all nations' currencies should be valued at a level that is neither too high nor too low. Such a level would help sustain long-term economic growth and stability both here and abroad. However, this ideal is difficult to reach since many factors affect the value of a nation's money. Some of the factors are complex, but many are quite simple.

    The Value of a Currency

    The value of a currency can be viewed from a domestic as well as an international perspective. Domestically, we use measures such as the Consumer Price Index (CPI) to measure changes in the purchasing power of the dollar over time. When the CPI increases, we say that the dollar is buying less — the value or purchasing strength of the dollar is going down. If the CPI is relatively stable, we say that the value of the dollar is stable. For some products with falling prices, we can even say that the purchasing power of the dollar is increasing.

    Even when the dollar may be stable domestically, the value of the dollar could rise or fall as measured by another country's currency. In those cases, a currency is a commodity. It is something that has a price and is bought and sold to be used. The medium of exchange used to purchase this commodity is the currency of another country. The dollar, in that perspective, is purchased by foreign citizens who will, in turn, use it to purchase U.S. goods and services or dollar-denominated assets such as Treasury securities, corporate or municipal bonds, or stock.

    An interesting aspect of foreign exchange is that a currency may be strengthening but still may not be strong relative to its historical position. For example, if the dollar were to rise from 85 yen to the dollar to 88 yen, it is strengthening. However, because the dollar historically is worth more than 100 yen, it is still not "strong." Likewise, a dollar that falls to 175 yen from 185 yen is weakening, but certainly not weak by historical comparison.

    Almost every international exchange of goods and services requires the exchange of one currency for another. Less frequently, some countries will barter goods, or settle payments in gold. But most international transactions involve foreign exchange. The individual, firm or government of another country that wants to buy U.S. products needs dollars. This is because the dollar is legal tender in this country and transactions tend to be denominated in dollars.

    The dollar, of course, is not the only currency that is bought and sold, but it is among the most popular. Other important currencies include the euro, the Japanese yen and the German deutschmark (sometimes referred to as the d-mark).

    cont...

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    Re: Gambling on a Weaker Dollar

    The Forex Market

    In most cases, the buying and selling of currencies takes place in the forex market. The currencies of most advanced and many developing economies are traded in this market. The forex market does not involve sending large loads of currency from one country to another. Typically it involves electronic balances. Dollar-denominated balances in computers in the U.S. or other countries are traded for computer-housed balances around the world that are denominated in yen, euros, d-marks, or any of dozens of other commonly traded monies. In short, when "currency" is traded, paper and metal are not the usual media of exchange. Foreign exchange exists mainly in the world of cyberspace.

    Not all currencies are traded on forex markets. Currencies that are not traded are avoided for reasons ranging from political instability to economic uncertainty. Sometimes a country's currency is not exchanged for the simple reason that the country produces very few products of interest to other countries.

    Unlike the commodities or stock markets, the forex market has no central trading floor where buyers and sellers meet. Most of the trades are completed by commercial banks and forex dealers in the U.S. and abroad using telephones and computers.

    The forex market operates worldwide, 24 hours a day. Traders in Australia and the Far East begin trading in Hong Kong, Singapore, Tokyo, and Sydney at about the time most workers in San Francisco are going home for supper the previous evening. As the business day in the Far East closes, trading in Middle Eastern financial centers has been going on for a couple of hours, and the trading day in Europe is just beginning. By the time the New York business day gets going in full force, it is almost time for early afternoon tea in London. Some of the large U.S. banks and brokerage houses have an early shift to minimize the time difference of 5 to 6 hours with Europe. To complete the circle, West Coast financial institutions extend "normal banking hours" so they can trade with New York or Europe on one side, and with Hong Kong, Singapore, or Tokyo on the other.

    In each case, financial institutions, corporations, or even interested individuals buy and sell money. They use one currency to purchase another. In many cases, they are buying money as part of doing business in the country that issues that currency. But in other cases, firms or individuals may buy one currency in one market to sell it in another and profit from the difference in price. This speculating on price differences is called arbitrage. In an age of virtually instant communication, this is especially challenging because the differences in price may last only a few seconds.

    The forex market is distinguished here from the forex futures market, which has several trading floors, principally the International Monetary Market, a division of the Chicago Mercantile Exchange. The futures market in forex was developed to help reduce risk for international firms and financial institutions. The market was designed to "guarantee" exchange rates at a future date in order to facilitate international transactions. Prior to the development of forex futures, there could be a significant amount of risk in entering into a long-term contract with firms in other countries. One of the largest sources of risk was the inability to guarantee the relative value of the currencies involved at the date of delivery.

    Two is better than one

    It is often possible to see two different national currencies accepted in one country. In some foreign countries, the U.S. dollar is the "currency of choice" because individuals have misgivings about the soundness of the domestic currency. In other cases, accepting two currencies depends on location. For example, in areas near the Canadian border, U.S. currency is sometimes fully acceptable in Canadian shops and Canadian currency is used (often at the official exchange rate) in U.S. establishments. But generally speaking, these areas tend to be small and in close proximity to the borders. Usually the decision to accept a foreign currency is made by local establishments as a convenience to border-crossing tourists.

    Price Determined by Supply and Demand

    The forex market is essentially governed by the law of supply and demand and is generally not regulated by any government or coalition of governments. This is true in the U.S., where participation in the forex market is not regulated. The prices set for each country's money is determined by the desire of those trading to acquire more of it or to hold less of it. Each individual acts on the belief that he or she will benefit from the transaction.

    According to the law of supply, as prices rise for a given item (in this case money), the quantity of the item that is supplied will increase; conversely, as the price falls, the quantity provided will fall. The law of demand states that as the price for an item rises, the quantity demanded will fall. As the price for an item falls, the quantity demanded will rise. It is the interaction of these basic forces that results in the movement of currency prices in the forex market.

    For example, if French investors saw an opportunity in the U.S., they might be willing to pay more francs in order to get dollars to invest in the U.S. If the dollar moved from five francs per dollar to six francs per dollar, the dollar "strengthened against the franc." In other words, a dollar could buy more francs. We could also state the same movement in francs. In the example above, the franc would move from 20¢ per franc to approximately 16¢ per franc. The franc "weakened against the dollar" because a franc could buy fewer dollars.

    How do changes in a currency's value affect a country's domestic economy? To show the effects, we can look at the U.S. economy during the 1990s. The dollar was quite strong in relation to other currencies during most of that period. Dollars were in high demand for a number of reasons. Among these was the desire of foreign citizens to buy U.S. financial securities such as Treasury notes and bonds, corporate bonds, and other U.S. assets. Part of the reason for this was the general attractiveness of U.S. government securities; another was because U.S. financial markets were booming through much of the period.

    Factors Contributing to a Strong Currency


    Higher interest rates in home country than abroad

    .Lower rates of inflation
    .A domestic trade surplus relative to other countries
    .A large, consistent government deficit crowding out domestic borrowing
    .Political or military unrest in other countries
    .A strong domestic financial market
    .Strong domestic economy/weaker foreign economies
    .No record of default on government debt
    .Sound monetary policy aimed at price stability.
    .Factors Contributing to a Weak Currency

    Lower interest rates in home country than abroad

    .Higher rates of inflation
    .A domestic trade deficit relative to other countries
    .A consistent government surplus
    .Relative political/military stability in other countries
    .A collapsing domestic financial market
    .Weak domestic economy/stronger foreign economies
    .Frequent or recent default on government debt
    .Monetary policy that frequently changes objectives.

    Many sectors of the U.S. economy were borrowing heavily during this period. Government, corporations, and individuals were relying on credit. This created strong demand for money to lend to borrowers. Typically, money saved by consumers is used to help meet such demand. Unfortunately, savings rates in the U.S. were low. Consequently, the money for U.S. borrowing had to come from somewhere. Funds from abroad helped to meet the demand. This rise in demand increased the price of dollars relative to other currencies. This, in turn, made it more attractive for investors to hold dollars.

    At the same time, the Federal Reserve kept inflation under control. This made the dollar attractive because of its stability. These trends combined to raise the cost of the dollar for foreign investors. The relatively high rates of return in U.S. financial markets enabled investors to earn better profits than could be found in their own financial markets. The increased demand for U.S. investments helped to make the dollar stronger. In addition to attractive rates, foreigners were eager to invest in the United States because this country was, and still is, seen as a comparatively stable, safe haven where investments are secure.

    cont...

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    Re: Gambling on a Weaker Dollar

    Effects on an Economy

    The decisions of citizens to invest in another country can have a significant effect on their domestic economy. In the case of the U.S., the desire of foreign investors to hold dollar-denominated assets helped finance the U.S. government's large budget deficit and supplied funds to private credit markets. According to the laws of supply and demand, an increased supply of funds — in this case funds provided by other countries — tends to lower the price of those funds. The price of funds is the interest rate. The increase in the supply of funds extended by foreign investors helped finance the budget deficit and helped keep interest rates below what they would have been without foreign capital.

    The rising demand for dollar-denominated assets also had a negative effect on the U.S. economy. The stronger dollar increased the attractiveness of foreign goods in the U.S. Many price-conscious U.S. consumers responded by purchasing more imports and fewer domestic goods. This did help keep inflation under control. But at the same time, U.S. exports were more expensive to foreigners who tended to buy fewer U.S. goods. As a result, the trade deficit widened as U.S. exports decreased and U.S. imports increased.

    When a currency becomes too strong or too weak, it tends to distort international competition. As we have seen, the strong dollar of the 1990s distorted the competitiveness of U.S. producers in relation to foreign producers. Even though foreign producers may not have used their resources as efficiently as their U.S. counterparts, they still might have been able to sell their products at lower prices than U.S. goods.

    Many U.S. companies responded to this increased competition by streamlining their processes and increasing productivity. In the long run, increased productivity benefited these companies and the U.S. economy. However, some producers could not make sufficient adjustments and found that their products could not compete in either U.S. or international markets.

    In reaction, many of those hurt by foreign imports called for government assistance to limit foreign competition. This assistance came in the form of tariffs, quotas, subsidies and embargoes. This sentiment of protectionism is potentially one of the most harmful outgrowths of changes in the relative strengths of currencies. If one government passes laws setting up protective barriers, other countries would likely retaliate with protective measures of their own. International trade would slow, and people in all nations would then lose the benefits of better quality, lower prices, and a broader selection of products.

    A Different Lesson from the '90s

    The reason a currency weakens may not have much to do with problems in that country's economy. Sometimes, a currency weakens simply because of external factors. While most of the 1990s saw a strong U.S. dollar, the U.S faced a different situation briefly during the middle of the decade.

    During the autumn of 1995, the U.S. dollar began to weaken significantly against both the Japanese yen and the German d-mark. The U.S. economy was still recovering from the 1990-91 recession, although many were concerned about the weakness of the recovery. When the dollar began to fall, this increased investors' and consumers' concern about the strength of the recovery. There were even calls for the Treasury to direct the Federal Reserve to buy dollars and sell yen and d-marks in an attempt to strengthen the dollar.

    However, the dollar was not falling because the U.S. economy was weak. Rather, the rising value of the other currencies reflected improving economic conditions within those countries. In Germany, the continued reunification of East and West, while presenting problems, was viewed as an opportunity to reach a large population that previously had not had access to Western goods and services. High interest rates in the reunified Germany were also an attraction to investors.

    A different scenario was unfolding in Japan. Despite low interest rates, deflation was actually making "real" Japanese interest rates fairly attractive. Real interest rates are usually calculated by subtracting the rate of inflation from the interest rate quoted. Thus, a 4 percent interest rate in an economy with 3 percent inflation converts to a real rate of interest of only 1 percent (4 percent - 3 percent = 1 percent). Negative inflation (commonly called deflation) essentially adds that rate to the market interest rate. An interest rate of 2 percent in an economy with 3 percent deflation yields a real rate of interest of 5 percent.

    Thus, the reason the dollar "weakened" during the fall of 1995 had less to do with weakness in the U.S. economy than with positive opportunities in the economies of Germany and Japan.

    Stable Dollar

    A strong currency can have both a positive and a negative impact on a nation's economy. The same holds true for a weak currency. Currencies that are too strong or too weak not only affect individual economies, but tend to distort international trade and economic and political decisions worldwide. This is compounded by the fact that individual consumers can benefit from changes in the value of a currency, while producers in the same country are hurt. But the value of a currency alone does not dictate trade flows. Many other factors are involved, such as the quality of the product. Nevertheless, changes in currency values can have a dramatic effect. Ideally, currency values should be relatively stable and at a level that can sustain long-term economic growth both here and abroad.

    Bretton Woods and Fixed Rates

    If shifts in exchange rates can cause problems, why not fix rates between countries? Under a fixed-rate system, a dollar would always be worth the same amount of pounds, lira, yen or d-marks. This idea is not new. Through most of the modern era the world was on a fixed-rate system. The most recent version is referred to as the Bretton Woods System.

    In 1944, the industrialized countries of the world met in Bretton Woods, New Hampshire, to discuss the state of the international economy in the post-WW II era. The heart of the discussion evolved around a plan to fix the rate of exchange for all foreign currencies to the U.S. dollar. The dollar would, in turn, be tied to gold for purposes of international settlement at a set price. This meant that a pound, lira, yen, etc., would always yield a fixed number of dollars. And an ounce of gold would always cost a set number of dollars.

    The hope was that the U.S. dollar would provide stability for international trade. This stability would, in turn, translate to a solid base upon which the war-torn economies of Europe and Asia could rebuild. One disadvantage of this system was that participating nations would need to take actions that would affect their domestic economy — such as increasing or decreasing the money supply — in order to maintain their exchange rate.

    The Bretton Woods Agreement, as it came to be called, started to unravel in the early 1960s. The U.S. had enjoyed a period of prosperity for most of the period since the end of World War II. Because the U.S. dollar was not convertible to gold domestically, but was considered "as good as gold" internationally, the growing U.S. economy (and money supply) meant that excess dollars easily found their way overseas.

    But, in order to maintain the value of their currencies relative to the dollar, other countries had to expand their money supplies just as quickly in order to maintain the agreed upon ratios of foreign currencies to dollars. This increase in foreign currencies introduced higher inflation to those nations. The U.S. was, in essence, exporting inflation.

    By the late 1960s, the now resurgent countries of Europe and Asia recognized one of the sources of their inflation problems. They were reluctant to increase their domestic money supply to keep pace with the U.S., so they began to return excess dollars, demanding gold in payment at the agreed-upon rate of exchange. This led to an outflow of gold from the U.S. Eventually the U.S. holdings of gold became dangerously low. By 1971, President Nixon was forced to close the "gold window" by no longer exchanging dollars for gold at the agreed-upon rate. Since that time, exchange rates have been allowed to "float," with rates determined by the supply of and demand for currencies.

    Notes

    Strong Dollar, Weak Dollar is one of a series of essays adapted from articles in On Reserve, a newsletter for economic educators published by the Federal Reserve Bank of Chicago. The original article was written by Keith Feiler and revised by Tim Schilling.



    .

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Posts
    12,866

    Re: Gambling on a Weaker Dollar

    Quote Originally Posted by Grim17
    I think I would like to have the link to the source of that editorial.

    I think I would also like to point out that the governments deficit from 2004 to 2005, shrunk by 100 billion dollars. Show me where these people that write these editorials that lady mod likes to post, predicted that the deficit was going to shrink like it did in 2005. If you can show me that, then maybe these people's opinions can be given some credibility. But, if their predictions haven't been accurate in the past 3 years or so, why should we now believe they have a clue about the future of America's economy?

    Can anyone say "Partisan politics?"

    I knew you could...

    .
    Here you go anul minded one: http://www.nytimes.com/2006/05/20/op...20sat1.html?hp

  13. #13
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Location
    SW United States
    Posts
    6,643

    Re: Gambling on a Weaker Dollar

    I say again lady mod:

    Show me where these people that write these editorials, predicted that the deficit was going to shrink like it did in 2005. If you can show me that, then maybe these people's opinions can be given some credibility. But, if their predictions haven't been accurate in the past 3 years or so, why should we now believe they have a clue about the future of America's economy?

    p.s.

    Using an opinion article from the NY Times to support your beliefs lady mod, is the same thing as trying to pass off opinions from the DNC as being unbiased and credible.

    .

  14. #14
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Posts
    586

    Re: Gambling on a Weaker Dollar

    Quote Originally Posted by Grim17
    I say again lady mod:

    Show me where these people that write these editorials, predicted that the deficit was going to shrink like it did in 2005. If you can show me that, then maybe these people's opinions can be given some credibility. But, if their predictions haven't been accurate in the past 3 years or so, why should we now believe they have a clue about the future of America's economy?

    p.s.

    Using an opinion article from the NY Times to support your beliefs lady mod, is the same thing as trying to pass off opinions from the DNC as being unbiased and credible.

    .
    Grim,

    While you wait for the link of the editorial, can you comment on the, news links provided by Lady Mod??

    DeeDee1965

  15. #15
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Location
    SW United States
    Posts
    6,643

    Re: Gambling on a Weaker Dollar

    Quote Originally Posted by DeeDee1965
    Grim,

    While you wait for the link of the editorial, can you comment on the, news links provided by Lady Mod??

    DeeDee1965
    What's there to comment on DeeDee?

    I read them... They are just speculation, nothing else. I have watched people like lady mod post negative stories about how the American economy is going to suffer, or collapse in the coming weeks or months, for the last 3 years. That is the reason I asked the question I did. Actually, lady mod demonstrated a behavior that many have attacked me for accusing those of the left of in the past. The left thrives on "Gloom and Doom". They only believe in the bad prediction, even when the people making them have been wrong time after time. They skip over positive statements and high-lite negative ones. For example, this came from lady mod's post. Notice what she highlighted, and what she didn't:

    Experts expect the dollar to further depreciate this year, especially against the Japanese yen and other Asian currencies. A weakening dollar doesn't bode well for long-term bonds, making them less attractive to foreign investors. But it could begin to whittle away at the huge imbalances that have built up in U.S. trade accounts — and that will be a plus for the U.S. economy and the markets.

    The good news is that almost no one sees a dollar crisis but, instead, an "orderly" retrenchment.
    See what I'm talking about?

    Anyway, I will wait for lady mod to show me how the writers she posted had correctly predicted the economy today, in their previous publications. I won't hold my breath though, because we all know that the publications she sites, have incorrectly predicted the U.S. economy would go into the toilet every month for the last 3 years... Their predictions, along with lady mods beliefs, will continue to be nothing but "Gloom and Doom" for America as long as their is a republican in the White House.

    .

  16. #16
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Posts
    27,212

    Re: Gambling on a Weaker Dollar

    Quote Originally Posted by Grim17
    What's there to comment on DeeDee?

    I read them... They are just speculation, nothing else. I have watched people like lady mod post negative stories about how the American economy is going to suffer, or collapse in the coming weeks or months, for the last 3 years. That is the reason I asked the question I did. Actually, lady mod demonstrated a behavior that many have attacked me for accusing those of the left of in the past. The left thrives on "Gloom and Doom". They only believe in the bad prediction, even when the people making them have been wrong time after time. They skip over positive statements and high-lite negative ones. For example, this came from lady mod's post. Notice what she highlighted, and what she didn't:



    See what I'm talking about?

    Anyway, I will wait for lady mod to show me how the writers she posted had correctly predicted the economy today, in their previous publications. I won't hold my breath though, because we all know that the publications she sites, have incorrectly predicted the U.S. economy would go into the toilet every month for the last 3 years... Their predictions, along with lady mods beliefs, will continue to be nothing but "Gloom and Doom" for America as long as their is a republican in the White House.

    .

    rome lasted as long as the emperor did!?hehe!!you never have told me what the economy means anyway!?it's not cause you CANT is it!?hehe!!in your OWN words if you please!?but as republican we all realize......you DONT HAVE TO!?hehe!!WHO KNEW!?jusy askin!?......

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