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    Dr. Bob Cornuke Crackpot / Noah's Ark Controversy

    Dr. Bob Cornuke is the religious fanatic who outed me. Thanks to Bob my family suffered through a hideous and totally groundless harassment suit that ran up $50,000.00 in legal bills. Thanks to him I was falsely accused of making death threats and stalking some of his religious scammer friends. I think it is high time we investigate this fanatical Christian who chose to make my name public and put my family in danger. Bob wrote to me, "I pray that everyone involved takes a Godly course of action in the future." Too bad his religious scammer friends never act in a Godly fashion when there are pockets to empty.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bob_Cornuke
    Bob Cornuke (born 1951) is a controversial American writer and amateur archaeologist. Cornuke is president of the Bible Archaeology Search and Exploration Institute (BASE), which is operated from his home in Colorado Springs, Colorado.[1] He describes himself as a Biblical archaeologist, but has no degree or training in archaeology.[1]
    Contents

    [hide]

    [edit] Background and explorations

    He holds a Masters of Arts in Biblical Studies and a Ph.D. in Bible and Theology, both from the unaccredited Louisiana Baptist University.[2][3] He has been a police officer in Costa Mesa, California. He is the author of six books about his explorations over the last 20 years. Archaeologists and other critics characterize his approach of using of the Bible as a literal guide for his explorations as pseudoarchaeology.
    Cornuke is travel guide/business partners with Chuck Missler.[7] Cornuke received credits at Missler's unaccredited Koinonia Institute, which were transferable to the unaccredited Louisiana Baptist University.[3] Missler is a 1999 graduate of Louisiana Baptist University, and currently Cornuke in Colorado, a 2005 graduate, and Missler in Idaho are professors at the "school."
    Cornuke also makes a claim of discovering[4] the anchors from the Apostle Paul’s ship wreck, as described in the Bible's Book of Acts, chapter 27 — by searching the sea floor off the coast of Malta.
    His most recent expeditions were to Takht-i-Suleiman in Iran in July 2005 and June 2006, where he discovered a rock formation approximately 400 ft long at 13,120 ft (4,000 m) elevation. Cornuke's search appeared on Fox News,[5] CNN,[6] and Good Morning America[7] as well as others.
    [edit] Mount Sinai

    Cornuke's book, In Search of the Mountain of God, claimed he was the original researcher of the biblical match of Biblical Mount Sinai to Jabal al-Lawz in Saudi Arabia. Earlier, however, in 1984, Ron Wyatt had already claimed to be the discoverer of the Biblical Mount Sinai at Jabal al-Lawz[8], and in 2002 Randall Styx noted that Harry St. John Philby claimed such evidence in his 1957 book The Land of Midian[8]
    Author Gordon Franz claimed that Cornuke, "had forged a letter from the King of Saudi Arabia in order to obtain a visa into the Kingdom,"[9] and wanted to debunk Wyatt's, Cornuke's and Williams' claim that the Biblical Mt. Sinai was in Saudi Arabia. Franz argued that the "biggest problem with the identification of Mt. Sinai at Jebel Al-Lawz is that it does not meet the Biblical criteria for the site. These claims are based on three challenged assumptions and a supposed misunderstanding of the archaeological remains that they observed."[9] The three assumptions were: 1) the Sinai Peninsula was within the territorial borders of the Land of Egypt, 2) "that Mt. Sinai is located in the Land of Midian, which is identified as part of the Saudi Arabian peninsula," and 3) "Apostle Paul says in Gal. 4:25 that Mt. Sinai was in Saudi Arabia."[9]
    Cornuke responded to Franz's accusations by calling him to "honestly examine and evaluate the [credible] historical, geographical, archeological and Biblical evidence that Jabal al-Lawz might be the real Mount Sinai"[10]. Allen Kerkselager, Ph.D. Professor of Theology St. Joseph's University stated "Jabal al Lawz may also be the most convincing option for identifying the Mt. Sinai of biblical tradition" and should be researched.[11] Meanwhile Roy Knuteson former Professor of New Testament and Greek and Bible Archaeology at Northwestern College explained, "None of the suggested sites in the Sinai Peninsula fit the biblical requirements.[12]
    According to Cornuke, the scholar Frank Moore Cross of Harvard Divinity School[9] supports his Mt. Sinai claims, but according to Franz, "Frank Moore Cross, retired professor of Hebrew at Harvard University opines that the mountain of God was located in the Land of Midian. When asked if he had a guess what mountain might be Mt. Sinai, he responded, 'I really don't'" and Moore "later put the "Midian Hypothesis" in print, but did not endorse any mountains for the location of Mt. Sinai (Cross 1998: 60-68)."[9] Another critic noted the "BASE institute site had some quotes from respected archaeologists which seemed to support the idea that Jebel al-Lawz was a good candidate for Mount Sinai," but, "when I contacted some of these individuals, they assured me they never made such statements, neither did they feel Jebel al-Lawz was the real Mount Sinai."[13] Thus, "it became quickly obvious that some of the information on the BASE Institute site was not legitimate."[13]
    [edit] Maltese

    In 2002 Cornuke claimed to have found anchors from the Biblical shipwreck of St. Paul. This claim has been disputed, however, with Cornuke being labelled by some as a "con artist" who was claimed "to have found the wreck of Paul's ship from Acts - and then got sued for breaking 'all aspects' of an oral contract with a former US ambassador to Malta."[14] This case was unsuccessful with the judge ruling that the book was already released and could not be prevented from being sold.[15] His critics believe he is "more interested in the money to be gained from their claims than in providing genuine evidence for anything."[14] Cornuke says that these anchors were actually discovered by fishermen years before he went in search of them and had already been recovered.
    Gordon Franz noted Charles Grech (a retired restaurant owner) found a third anchor in front of the same underwater cave that might have been found off the Munxar Reef, but this was not certain. [16] Only one anchor was examined by Anthony Bonanno[17] and it was only examined in Mr. Grech's home.[16] Bonanno believes that anchor appears to be "consistent" with the "era of the shipwreck of St. Paul, in 60 A.D." and "a Roman/Alexandrian grain freighter,"[18] but he did not directly link the anchors with St. Paul.
    Franz unilaterally dismisses every Maltese claim Cornuke has made.[16] Franz has noted "had no tangible proof of the anchor stocks to show the world. The first of the anchor stocks was melted down; the second, third and fourth were in private collections; and the fifth and six had been sold."[16] So Cornuke, with "the aid of the US ambassador to Malta, Kathy Proffitt, was enlisted to convince the President and Prime Minister of Malta to offer an amnesty to anyone who would turn over antiquities found off the Munxar Reef" and the pardons were issued on September 23, 2002." As a result, "two anchor stocks" were "turned over to the authorities."
    Franz questions Cornuke's research in that "Mr. Cornuke does not interact with, or mention, some very important works on the subject of Paul's shipwreck; nor are they listed in his bibliography.".[16] All these scholars have claimed different sites where St. Paul may have been shipwrecked. Gordon also has criticized Cornuke's understanding of the biblical story and description. On August 15, 2005, James Mulholland, a life-long member of the Maltese community and a member of the Pauline Association in Malta, stated that Franz made four errors in his refutation of Cornuke and that Cornuke's evidence was not compelling.[16] Mulholland pointed out three problems with Franz's arguments: 1) That Marsaxxlokk bay was visible from Munxar Reef, 2) That Franz misidentified the Munxar reef referred to by Cornuke, 3) That Franz only dismisses, but does not refute Cornuke's identification of the real Munxar Reef as the location, and 4) while "Mr. Franz makes a compelling argument," but "these ancient sites would have been well-known by experienced sailors."[16] Mullholland concluded, "we could pick each element of Mr. Cornuke's overall theory and propose other locations that could possibly match that single element. However, that's not the appropriate exercise here. The compelling nature of Mr. Cornuke's theory rests in the fact that ALL of the elements come together in one location. I could show you a place on the western side of the island where they possibly meet."[16]
    In 2003 Christianity Today reported that the then U.S. ambassador Kathryn Proffitt sued Cornuke to stop the sale of his book after she arranged for the "Maltese government to pardon the fisherman."[15] (Cornuke would claim these "were from the apostle's ship.") Proffitt contended that as part of the pardon arrangement and several other issues, Cornuke agreed to remain silent about the pardon and "to allow Proffitt and the Maltese government to edit the book. He would also be required to encourage tourists to visit ancient temples."[15] According to some he did not keep his part of the agreement.[15]
    A federal judge denied the request to hold up publication of the book since it was already released at the time. Even still, "what the Maltese government is apparently upset about, however, isn't that Cornuke's book was published without its permission, but that it claims that the shipwreck never happened in the traditional site on the northeastern tip of the island, now known as St. Paul's Bay."[15]
    [edit] Saudi Arabia

    Cornuke and his partner "snuck" into Saudi Arabia illegally.[19] Later on Cornuke falsely told "guards" they were medical doctors after being captured so the Saudi Arabian guards did not consider them Jewish spies.[19] However, "Cornuke found himself in a sticky situation when one by one each guard came to him complaining of various ailments."[19][citation needed]
    [edit] Noah's Ark

    Cornuke's surrogates claimed in June 2006 that Cornuke may have discovered Noah's Ark in a pile of dark-colored rocks on the Iranian Takht-e Suleiman ("Throne of Solomon") or Mount Suleiman in the Alborz (Elborz) Mountains[20]. Cornuke relies heavily on one eyewitness of Noah's Ark, Ed Davis, in which there are problems with him being in Iran let alone at this site when he claimed to see Noah's Ark in 1943[21]. Even creationist geologists doubt whether the rocks viewed by Cornuke are petrified and are urging caution[22]. The research team included Arch Bonnema, film producer of The Genius Club and other well-known Christian businessmen. The oldest creationist organization does not believe the rocks viewed by Cornuke are petrified or Noah's Ark[23]. Even Cornuke himself isn't completely convinced that what he observed was Noah's Ark or even if it was petrified wood. Associates for Biblical Research also produced a 7,800-word paper about problems with the Cornuke site[24]. National Geographic critiqued the rocks at the site[25].
    Soapboxmom

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    Re: Dr. Bob Cornuke Crackpot / Noah's Ark Controv

    National geographic has writen several informative articles:


    Noah's Ark Discovered in Iran?

    Kate Ravilious
    for National Geographic News

    July 5, 2006

    High in the mountains of northwestern Iran, a Christian archaeology expedition has discovered a rock formation that its members say resembles the fabled Noah's ark. The team discovered the prominent boat-shaped rocks at just over 13,000 feet (4,000 meters) on Mount Suleiman in Iran's Elburz mountain range. (See Iran map, photo, country profile.)

    "It looks uncannily like wood," said Robert Cornuke, president of the Bible Archaeology Search and Exploration Institute (BASE), the Palmer Lake, Colorado-based group that launched the expedition.
    Photos taken by BASE members show a prow-shaped rock outcrop, which the team says resembles petrified wood, emerging from a ridge.
    "We have had [cut] thin sections of the rock made, and we can see [wood] cell structures," Cornuke said.
    Cornuke acknowledges that it may be hard to prove that this object was Noah's ark. But he says he is fairly convinced that the rock formation was an important place of pilgrimage in the past.
    The BASE team has uncovered evidence of an ancient shrine near the outcrop, suggesting that this was an important place to people in the past, Cornuke says.
    "We can't claim to have conclusively found the ark, but it does look like the object that the ancients talked about," Cornuke said.
    Noah and the Flood
    The story of Noah's ark is told in three major world religions: Christianity, Judaism, and Islam.
    The Book of Genesis describes a great flood created by God "to destroy all life under the heavens." But before the flood, God told Noah, one of his human followers, to build an ark and fill it with two of every species on the Earth.

    Once Noah had done this, it rained for 40 days and 40 nights. After 7 months and 17 days the waters receded, according to Genesis, and the ark came to rest on the mountains of Ararat.
    Most Bible scholars have interpreted this to refer to Mount Ararat in eastern Turkey. (See Turkey map.)


    But this location doesn't fit the description given in Genesis of the ark's passengers journeying from the east to arrive at Mesopotamia.
    Cornuke and his team think that Mount Ararat might be a red herring.
    "The Bible gives us a compass direction here, and it is not in the direction of Turkey. Instead it points directly towards Iran," Cornuke said.
    Pilgrim Shrine?
    Using the Book of Genesis and other literary sources, the BASE team journeyed to Iran in July 2005 to climb Mount Suleiman.
    They chose Mount Suleiman after reading the notes of 19th-century British explorer A. H. McMahan.
    In 1894, after climbing Mount Suleiman, McMahan wrote in his journal, "According to some, Noah's ark alighted here after the deluge."
    McMahan also spoke of wood fragments from a shrine at the top of the mountain where unknown people had made pilgrimages to the site.
    "We found a shrine and wood fragments at 15,000 feet [4,570 meters] elevation, as described by McMahan," Cornuke said.
    Subsequent carbon dating of samples from the shrine showed the wood fragments from the site to be around 500 years old.
    Lower on the mountain, expedition members came across the ark-like rock formation, which they estimate to be about 400 feet (122 meters) long.
    Rocks From the Sea?
    Not everyone is convinced by the BASE team's claims.
    Kevin Pickering, a geologist at University College London who specializes in sedimentary rocks, doesn't think that the ark-like rocks are petrified wood.
    "The photos appear to show iron-stained sedimentary rocks, probably thin beds of silicified sandstones and shales, which were most likely laid down in a marine environment a long time ago," he said.
    Pickering thinks that the BASE team may have mistaken the thin layers in the sediment for wood grain and the more prominent layers as beams of wood.
    "The wider layers in the rock are what we call bedding planes," he said.
    "They show fracture patterns that we associate with … the Earth processes that caused the rocks to be uplifted to their present height."
    The boat-shaped structure can also be explained geologically, says retired British geologist Ian West, who has studied Middle Eastern sediments.
    "Iran is famous for its small folds, many of which are the oil traps. Their oval, ark-like shape is classical," he said.
    Meanwhile, ancient timber specialist Martin Bridge, of England's Oxford Dendrochronology Laboratory, is doubtful that a wooden structure would have lasted long enough to petrify under ordinary conditions.
    "Wood will only survive for thousands of years if it is buried in very wet conditions or remains in an extremely arid environment," he said.
    Bible scholars think that Noah built his ark somewhere between 6,000 and 10,000 years ago, making preservation highly unlikely except in extreme environmental conditions.
    And even if the wood had petrified, there seems to be little evidence of Noah's carpentry, according to Robert Spicer, a geologist at England's Open University who specializes in the study of petrification.
    "What needs to be documented in this case are preserved, human-made joints, such as scarf, mortice and tenon, or even just pegged boards. I see none of this in the pictures. It's all very unconvincing," Spicer said.
    Bridge, the Oxford timber specialist, points out that it would also be impossible for a boat to run aground at 13,000 feet. "If you put all the water in the world together, melting both the ice caps and all the glaciers, you still wouldn't reach anywhere near the top of the mountain," he said.
    I think we should be asking why these alleged pieces of petrified wood have not been analyzed in a laboratory and independently verified by archaeologist and geologist would could intelligently discuss the chemical composition and formations in which they were found. Why is Cornuke not publishing papers in journals for peer review and analysis?

    Soapboxmom

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    Re: Dr. Bob Cornuke Crackpot / Noah's Ark Controv

    If there is not real science to back up these escapades, then the real issue may be just how profitable these safaris are for the promoters. Bob Cornuke has gained tremendous celebrity and possibly great wealth from these explorations. Just how many dollar signs is he seeing??? Where is the hard evidence to back up these stories???

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    Re: Dr. Bob Cornuke Crackpot / Noah's Ark Controv

    Dr. (or not Dr.) Bob's wife wrote me:
    Would you please send me your contact information including your address and telephone number. I would like to present your e-mail to our board of directors this Wednesday.

    We appreciate your cooperation and would like any information your could provide.

    Sincerely,

    Terry
    I gladly shared all of my information with her with the understanding I would keep their names private if they did me the same courtesy. They made my name public and got me slapped with a frivolous harassment suit, which I won as I have not made any false statements of fact. Winning that took me away from my family and wasted tens of thousands in attorney fees. So, I think researching the Cornukes is definitely in order.

    I will be sharing more of what other archaeologists, researchers and scientists have to say about Cornuke's safaris.

    Soapboxmom

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    LogicallyYours is offline Science flies you to the moon. Religion flies you into buildings.
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    Re: Dr. Bob Cornuke Crackpot / Noah's Ark Controv

    He sounds like that same type of ass-hat that Ron Wyatt was. Bullshit claims with out the proof...and then claims there is a conspiracy by science to refute the claims.
    "Religion is a heavy suitcase: all you have to do is put it down."
    -----------------------------------------------------------
    "I have read the bible...more than once. I was not impressed nor was I so moved to give up my ability to think for myself and surrender my knowledge of facts for the unfounded belief in a mythical sky-fairy." - Me.

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    Re: Dr. Bob Cornuke Crackpot / Noah's Ark Controv

    Quote Originally Posted by iamwil View Post
    I'm sorry, I don't understand at all.

    How is this different than someone giving their bank account to some scammer??

    You claim that all those that get into Amway or this or that MLM are suckers and losers.

    Yet you willingly walk into these things that put your savings and your family at risk??
    NO! I am honest and gave my name because it was the right thing to do. The Cornukes chose to make my name available to known scammers. That is how my name became public and I ended up fighting a frivolous harassment suit that has been discussed on here ad nauseum. The Cornukes have zero integrity.

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    Re: Dr. Bob Cornuke Crackpot / Noah's Ark Controv

    Quote Originally Posted by iamwil View Post
    But how is it that you get involved in so many lawsuits and wronged by this group or that group and you've got no personal responsiblity....it is all their fault. Does that happen to the rest of us? I think not.

    I think you can expect this to continue to occur in your life until you change your ways.
    Protecting the public by exposing pyramid schemes and psuedoscience is taking personal responsibility. I will not stand by and say nothing when folks are being defrauded out of thousands and tens of thousands of dollars by religious scammers.

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    Re: Dr. Bob Cornuke Crackpot / Noah's Ark Controv

    Raiders of the Faux Ark October 10, 2007
    by Eric H. Cline

    Biblical archeology is too important to leave to crackpots and ideologues. It's time to fight back.
    This editorial was first published in the Boston Globe on September 30, 2007, and is republished here with their kind permission.


    Eric Cline at Megiddo (Courtesy Eric Cline)
    Noah's Ark. The Ark of the Covenant. The Garden of Eden. Sodom and Gomorrah. The Exodus. The Lost Tomb of Jesus. All have been "found" in the last 10 years, including one within the past six months. The discoverers: a former SWAT team member; an investigator of ghosts, telepathy, and parapsychology; a filmmaker who calls himself "The Naked Archeologist"; and others, none of whom has any professional training in archeology.
    We are living in a time of exciting discoveries in biblical archeology. We are also living in a time of widespread biblical fraud, dubious science, and crackpot theorizing. Some of the highest-profile discoveries of the past several years are shadowed by accusations of forgery, such as the James Ossuary, which may or may not be the burial box of Jesus' brother, as well as other supposed Bible-era findings such as the Jehoash Tablet and a small ivory pomegranate said to be from the time of Solomon. Every year "scientific" expeditions embark to look for Noah's Ark, raising untold amounts of money from gullible believers who eagerly listen to tales spun by sincere amateurs or rapacious con men; it is not always easy to tell the two apart.
    The tools of modern archeology, from magnetometers to precise excavation methods, offer a growing opportunity to illuminate some of the intriguing mysteries surrounding the Bible, one of the foundations of western civilization. Yet the amateurs are taking in the public's money to support ventures that offer little chance of furthering the cause of knowledge. With their grand claims, and all the ensuing attention, they divert the public's attention from the scientific study of the Holy Land - and bring confusion, and even discredit, to biblical archeology.
    Unfortunately, when fantastic claims are made, they largely go unchallenged by academics. There have been some obvious exceptions, such as the recent film "The Lost Tomb of Jesus," which inspired an outcry from scholars by claiming that archeologists had found, but not recognized, the tomb of Jesus more than 20 years ago. But much more common is a vast and echoing silence reminiscent of the early days of the debate over "intelligent design," when biologists were reluctant to respond to the neocreationist challenge. Archeologists, too, are often reluctant to be seen as challenging deeply held religious beliefs. And so the professionals are allowing a PR disaster to slowly unfold: yielding a field of tremendous importance to pseudoscientists, amateur enthusiasts, and irresponsible documentary filmmakers.
    At a time when the world is increasingly divided by religion, both domestically and internationally, and when many people are biblically illiterate, legitimate inquiries into the common origins of religions have never been more important. I believe that the public deserves - and wants - better. We have an obligation to challenge the lies and the hype, to share the real data, so that the public discussion can be an informed one.
    It is time we take back our field.
    The first archeological endeavors in the Holy Land were conducted not by archeologists, but rather by theologians primarily interested in locating places mentioned in the Bible. Pride of place goes to the American minister Edward Robinson, who toured the Holy Land in 1838, accompanied by an American missionary named Eli Smith who was fluent in Arabic, in order to identify as many sites mentioned in the Bible as possible--in other words, to create a historical (and biblical) geography of Palestine. Others soon followed, including Sir Charles Warren, a British general who explored and recorded the features of Jerusalem in the 1860s. None of these men were archeologists, but they made important contributions to the field.
    Throughout much of the nineteenth century, the field of biblical archeology was dominated by men said to have been working with a Bible in one hand and a trowel in the other. The field soon became more scientific, thanks to the efforts of men like Sir William Matthew Flinders Petrie, who introduced into archeology the dual concepts of stratigraphy (when two succeeding cities are built one on top of the other, the lower one will always be earlier in time) and pottery seriation (pottery types go in and out of style, just like today's clothes, and can be used to help date the stratigraphic levels observable at ancient sites).
    By the time Dame Kathleen Kenyon was excavating in Jericho and Jerusalem during the mid-twentieth century, archeology was in the hands of professionals trained not just in proper excavation techniques, but in the scientific method, and with years of schooling in ancient languages, cultures, and history. They also mastered bodies of literature and theory and spent years practicing their craft and being subjected to peer review. Theological motivation became less important.


    Excavations at Megiddo
    Today there are strict standards concerning excavations in every country in the Middle East. Permission to excavate must be obtained from the proper authorities, with presentation of a detailed research plan, good reasons given for the questions being examined, evidence of sufficient *******, and often a strategy for conservation of the site upon completion of the excavation. Peer review of any large ******* proposals is obligatory. In short, it is a serious and highly competitive field.
    As a result, however, we have seen a rise of two cultures - the scientists and the amateur enthusiasts. Lacking the proper training and credentials, the amateurs are sustained by vanity presses, television, and now the Internet.
    For example, in 2006, Bob Cornuke, a former SWAT team member turned biblical investigator--and now president of the Bible Archaeology Search and Exploration (BASE) Institute in Colorado - led an expedition searching for Noah's Ark. Media reports breathlessly announced that Cornuke's team had discovered boat-shaped rocks at an altitude of 13,000 feet on Mount Suleiman in Iran's Elburz mountain range. Cornuke said the rocks look "uncannily like wood. . . .We have had [cut] thin sections of the rock made, and we can see [wood] cell structures."
    But peer review would have quickly debunked these findings. Kevin Pickering, a geologist at University College London who specializes in sedimentary rocks, said, "The photos appear to show iron-stained sedimentary rocks, probably thin beds of silicified sandstones and shales, which were most likely laid down in a marine environment a long time ago."
    Then there is Michael Sanders, who has made a habit of using NASA satellite photographs to search for biblical locations and objects. From 1998 to 2001, Sanders announced that he had not only located the lost cities of Sodom and Gomorrah, but also the Garden of Eden, the Ark of the Covenant, and the Tower of Babel.
    Sanders describes himself on his website as a "Biblical Scholar of Archaeology, Egyptology and Assyriology," but according to the Los Angeles Times, he "concedes that he has no formal archeological training." Other newspaper accounts describe him as a "self-made scholar" who did research in parapsychology at Duke University.
    And we must not forget documentary filmmaker Simcha Jacobovici. He bills himself as "The Naked Archeologist" in a television series on the History Channel, but has repeatedly stated during media interviews that he is an investigative journalist rather than an archeologist. Jacobovici is perhaps best known for "The Lost Tomb of Jesus," which first aired in March 2007 and which has been described by professor Jodi Magness of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill as making "a sensationalistic claim without any scientific basis or support."
    In short, the amateur arena is full of deeply flawed junk science. Important issues are cloaked in legitimate-sounding terminology, little attention is paid to the investigative process, and contrary evidence is ignored.
    Biblical archeologists are suddenly finding themselves in a position similar to the evolutionary biologists fighting intelligent design - an entire parallel version of their field is being driven by religious belief, not research principles. The biologists' situation makes the risk clear - they did not deign to mount a public refutation of the "science" of intelligent design for years, until it was almost too late, and thus anti-evolutionary science began making its way into the public schools.
    Why are we sitting the battle out?
    Partly, this is a matter of a strain of snobbery that runs through many academic fields: a suspicion of colleagues who venture too far from "serious" topics or appear in the popular media too often.
    Partly it is a matter of the uncertainty of the stories themselves: many biblical questions are so shrouded in uncertainty as to be inherently unsolvable. For example, even if the Garden of Eden once were a real place, and even if we knew the general location where it might have been, how would we know when we had found it? When most archeologists and biblical scholars hear that someone has (yet again) discovered Noah's Ark, they roll their eyes and get on with their business. This can leave the impression that the report might be true.
    And partly it is because scientific findings may challenge religious dogma. Biblical scholarship is highly charged because the Bible is a religious book and any research carries the prospect of "proving" or "disproving" treasured beliefs. What if the Exodus might not have taken place as described in the Bible? Similarly, what will people do when told that there are identical stories to Noah and the Ark, but they were recorded between 500 and 1,000 years earlier sans Noah? And that the flood was sent because the people were too noisy and the Gods couldn't sleep, not because people were evil and sinning? Or when you tell them that "an eye for an eye, a tooth for a tooth" was a concept expressed in Hammurabi's Law Code nearly 1,000 years before the Bible?
    This is where it can get daunting for academics, for it is at this point that the ideologues frequently weigh in. And these pundits are often sophisticated and convincing debaters, which can make them intimidating opponents for a scholar.
    But we don't need to go looking for Noah's Ark to find confirmation of details found in the Bible. During the past century or so, archeologists have found the first mention of Israel outside the Bible, in an Egyptian inscription carved by the pharaoh Merneptah in the year 1207 B.C. They have found mentions of Israelite kings, including Omri, Ahab, and Jehu, in neo-Assyrian inscriptions from the early first millennium B.C. And they have found, most recently, a mention of the House of David in an inscription from northern Israel dating to the ninth century B.C. These are conclusive pieces of evidence that these people and places once existed and that at least parts of the Bible are historically accurate. Perhaps none of these is as attention-getting as finding Noah's Ark, but they serve to deepen our understanding of, and appreciation for, the Bible.
    Religious archeologists and secular archeologists frequently work side by side in the Holy Land. Among the top ranks of researchers, there are evangelical Christians, orthodox Jews, and people of many denominations. It is not religious views that are the issue here; it is whether good science is being done. Biblical archeology is a field in which people of good will, and all religions, can join under the banner of the scientific process.
    Most archeological organizations, including the American Schools of Oriental Research, the Archaeological Institute of America, and the Society for American Archaeology, state that it is one of the obligations of professional archeologists to make their findings and discoveries generally available. But we need to do more than simply publish research if we are to successfully counter junk science. We need to take our information to the public not only via writing but also via radio, television, film, and any other available media.
    Remember that biblical mysteries are not just ancient history. For example, did Joshua really fight the Battle of Jericho and drive the Canaanites out of the land, as stated in the biblical account of the Israelite conquest of Canaan? If so, who was there first and to whom does the land really belong today? Does it matter? It does to many Palestinians, who exert a (dubious) claim as descendants of the Canaanites and Jebusites, and to many Israelis, who exert a similar claim based on their own understanding of their ancestors' history.
    Remember, too, that archeologists who speak out can make a difference. "Disclaimer statements" have recently been posted on Bob Cornuke's Web pages concerning the Ark of the Covenant, Noah's Ark, and the location of Mount Sinai. Now, for instance, we find the statement that the BASE Institute "does not make the claim that we have found Noah's Ark. We'll let you draw your own conclusions. In our opinion, it's a candidate. The research continues."
    Even when our own investigations come up empty - we can't solve all the mysteries in the Bible - we can present the current state of our evidence. And we can promote a shared methodology, and a shared body of facts, that can be used by everyone. The data and opinions that we provide may not end any debates, but they will introduce genuine archeological and historical data and considerations into the mix. We owe it to the ancient world, and to the people who inhabited it, to do no less.
    Eric H. Cline is the author of From Eden to Exile: Unraveling Mysteries of the Bible. He is chair of the department of classical and Semitic languages and literature at the George Washington University in Washington, D.C. He is also associate director (USA) of the ongoing excavations at Megiddo (biblical Armageddon) in Israel. He can be reached at [email protected].

    © 2007 by the Archaeological Institute of America
    www.archaeology.org/online/features/fauxark/

    ----------------------------------------
    The Archaeological Institute of America and National Geographic are just some of the fine groups analyzing the work of Bob Cornuke the crackpot and religious scammer that turned my family's life upside down.

    Soapboxmom

  9. #9
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    Re: Dr. Bob Cornuke Crackpot / Noah's Ark Controv

    Quote Originally Posted by Soapboxmom View Post
    If there is not real science to back up these escapades, then the real issue may be just how profitable these safaris are for the promoters. Bob Cornuke has gained tremendous celebrity and possibly great wealth from these explorations. Just how many dollar signs is he seeing??? Where is the hard evidence to back up these stories???

    Soapboxmom
    Have you been praying for him? Why not let God punish him for what he has done? You need to forgive him as Jesus forgave him on the cross. He will have to answer to God for his deeds. You should worry about being the best you can be for God and get on with your life.

  10. #10

    Re: Dr. Bob Cornuke Crackpot / Noah's Ark Controv

    So everyone who is a Christian is considered a "crackpot" ??? Then we are in a modern day "Noah-time" (because he was laughed at & ridiculed also, as being a "crazy person".....until the floodwaters/rains DID come and drowned all BUT Noah's family). A curious scientist looked for evidence of a biblical flood -- and FOUND it ......an approximate 6 foot layer of natural quick-setting limestone on EVERY CONTINENT on this planet. It's called the "Austin Chalk" because he found it first in Austin, TX; it's of a white, chalky consistency. And everywhere he found it, it was the same size layer, same substance. Explain that one.

    I know who Dr. Bob Cornuke is.....I've seen him and his colleague (WITH their photos of the remains of Noah's Ark) as guests on the previous TV show, Creation In the 20th (then 21st when we hit 2000) Century, hosted by Creation Evidences Museum founder/director Dr. Carl Baugh.

    Of course, you would naturally consider Dr. Baugh a crackpot, too......what if these scientists ARE right ??? What if YOU are the ones who have been lied to ?? What if generations of people educated to believe evolution have been the ones lied to ??? Have you ever thought of that ???

    Nobody has successfully proved the Bible wrong yet. Everything continues to consistently prove it authentic and correct.....no matter how many times its critics try to disprove its truths, or discredit its defenders. Archaeologists have found, and continue to find, ancient remains of and sites of biblical cities EXACTLY where the Bible states they were, INCLUDING the remains of all the stalls housing King Solomon's 1,000 horses (long considered a myth until they were found). King David was long considered a myth until one of the workers on a dig found a piece of written clay tablet mentioning "House of David" on it (totally stunning the scientist-organizer of that archaeological team) -- the clay tablet was later confirmed as authenic; every historical world event phophesied in the Bible has happened EXACTLY how the Bible stated it would (when, where, how, who involved). Explain that !!!
    Last edited by SanPedroGirl; 12-08-2010 at 10:05 AM.

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    Re: Dr. Bob Cornuke Crackpot / Noah's Ark Controv

    Quote Originally Posted by SanPedroGirl View Post
    So everyone who is a Christian is considered a "crackpot" ??? Then we are in a modern day "Noah-time" (because he was laughed at & ridiculed also, as being a "crazy person".....until the floodwaters/rains DID come and drowned all BUT Noah's family). A curious scientist looked for evidence of a biblical flood -- and FOUND it ......an approximate 6 foot layer of natural quick-setting limestone on EVERY CONTINENT on this planet. It's called the "Austin Chalk" because he found it first in Austin, TX; it's of a white, chalky consistency. And everywhere he found it, it was the same size layer, same substance. Explain that one.
    The 'Austin Chalk' is not found around the world, only in the Gulf Coast region of the US. The 'Austin Chalk' deposit, like all other chalk deposits, is made up primarily of coccoliths (Wiki). Coccoliths are the calcium carbonate plate shell remains of a single celled algae known as coccolithophores. Basically, chalk is made up of the fossilized remains of plankton. Chalk deposits do not form quickly. The most famous chalk deposit (White Cliffs of Dover) are at the maximum ~350 feet thick, compared to your 'Austin Chalk's' 6 feet. Chalk deposits formed 100-65 million years ago.

    Also, not all chalk deposits have the same make-up. For example, the 'Austin Chalk' contains volcanic ash deposits that are 86 million years old, the 'White Cliffs of Dover' do not have these ash deposits. Chalks can also contain, flint, chert, quartz, and other mineral compounds.
    usgs.gov/geology
    wiki- Austin Chalk
    oilshalegas.com/austinchalk

    If you check the USGS website you'll find that the oldest record of this deposit is from 1860, that's before the Civil War.
    Shumard, B.F., 1860, Observations upon the Cretaceous strata of Texas: St. Louis Academy of Science Transactions, v. 1, p. 583-590.


    Quote Originally Posted by SanPedroGirl View Post
    Nobody has successfully proved the Bible wrong yet. Everything continues to consistently prove it authentic and correct.....no matter how many times its critics try to disprove its truths, or discredit its defenders. Archaeologists have found, and continue to find, ancient remains of and sites of biblical cities EXACTLY where the Bible states they were, INCLUDING the remains of all the stalls housing King Solomon's 1,000 horses (long considered a myth until they were found). King David was long considered a myth until one of the workers on a dig found a piece of written clay tablet mentioning "House of David" on it (totally stunning the scientist-organizer of that archaeological team) -- the clay tablet was later confirmed as authenic; every historical world event phophesied in the Bible has happened EXACTLY how the Bible stated it would (when, where, how, who involved). Explain that !!!
    We've also proved that Troy (Wiki) existed.
    So does this prove that Homer's Iliad was real?
    Does it mean that Odysseus, Ajax, Phoenix, Hector, and Achilles were real?
    Does it mean that Achilles could only be killed by a strike to his heel?
    Does it mean that the Greek gods were real? Many are mentioned in this story.

    No one has ever proved the Iliad wrong.

    You can not generally prove a negative logically.
    For example;
    Can you prove the pink unicorns do not exist?
    Can you prove that there is not a yellow teacup circling the Sun?

    Oh, besides, The Exodus (Wiki),
    Archaeology
    While some archaeologists leave open the possibility of a Semitic tribe coming from Egyptian servitude among the early hilltop settlers and that Moses or a Moses-like figure may have existed in Transjordan ca 1250-1200, they dismiss the possibility that the Exodus could have happened as described in the Bible.[23] A century of research by archaeologists and Egyptologists has found no evidence which can be directly related to the Exodus narrative of an Egyptian captivity and the escape and travels through the wilderness,[20] and it has become increasingly clear that Iron Age Israel - the kingdoms of Judah and Israel - has its origins in Canaan, not Egypt:[24] the culture of the earliest Israelite settlements is Canaanite, their cult-objects are those of the Canaanite god El, the pottery remains in the local Canaanite tradition, and the alphabet used is early Canaanite. Almost the sole marker distinguishing the "Israelite" villages from Canaanite sites is an absence of pig bones, although whether this can be taken as an ethnic marker or is due to other factors remains a matter of dispute.[25]
    You also may want to check these disclaimers at the BASE Institute website;
    http://www.baseinstitute.org/index.p...d=51&Itemid=65
    Disclaimer Statement
    The research and site survey being investigated by the BASE Institute has strong potential. Is it the remains of Noah's Ark? The BASE Institute does not make the claim that we have found Noah's Ark. We'll let you draw your own conclusions. In our opinion, it's a candidate. The research continues.
    http://www.baseinstitute.org/index.p...d=72&Itemid=94
    Disclaimer Statement

    The research and site survey being investigated by the BASE Institute has strong potential. Is it the Biblical Mt. Sinai? The BASE Institute does not make the claim that we have found Mount Sinai. We'll let you draw your own conclusions. In our opinion, it's a candidate. The research continues....
    http://www.baseinstitute.org/index.p...d=54&Itemid=68
    Disclaimer Statement
    The research and site survey being investigated by the BASE Institute has strong potential. Is it the path of the Ark of the Covenant? The BASE Institute does not make the claim that we have found the Ark of the Covenant. We'll let you draw your own conclusions. In our opinion, it's a candidate. The research continues.
    Bold text added by me to highlight that the BASE Institute is not making these claims.
    Last edited by nomaxim; 12-08-2010 at 03:00 PM.
    Ignorance more frequently begets confidence than does knowledge: it is those who know little, and not those who know much, who so positively assert that this or that problem will never be solved by science. -C. Darwin

  12. #12
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    Re: Dr. Bob Cornuke Crackpot / Noah's Ark Controv

    Quote Originally Posted by TerryP View Post
    Have you been praying for him? Why not let God punish him for what he has done? You need to forgive him as Jesus forgave him on the cross. He will have to answer to God for his deeds. You should worry about being the best you can be for God and get on with your life.
    AHHH...one of the gems from TerryTard. Priceless.
    "Religion is a heavy suitcase: all you have to do is put it down."
    -----------------------------------------------------------
    "I have read the bible...more than once. I was not impressed nor was I so moved to give up my ability to think for myself and surrender my knowledge of facts for the unfounded belief in a mythical sky-fairy." - Me.

  13. #13
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    Re: Dr. Bob Cornuke Crackpot / Noah's Ark Controv

    since the beginning of man, how many davids have there been!? a million or 2!? and they had houses no doubt!? and a man's house carried his name, thus house of david!? do you think god would let man prove he exists by certainty in the history of the bible!? NOT A CHANCE!? in my opinion, that would be CHEATING!? nope, like the song says, you gotta make love outa NUTHIN at all!? that's what makes it SPECIAL and UNDENIABLE!? facts can always be denied/disproved!? the shadow of a doubt thing!? :judges: :cwm2: :spin2: :
    i do not endorse/recommend any advertising on scam.com associated with my name /posts or otherwise. thank you

  14. #14
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    Re: Dr. Bob Cornuke Crackpot / Noah's Ark Controv

    every historical world event phophesied in the Bible has happened EXACTLY how the Bible stated it would (when, where, how, who involved). Explain that !!!
    Complete and utter bullshit! Name one "prophesied" event from the bible that was proved true. AND then, tell us what the next one will be. Provide the date and time.

    You people are fantastic at ascribing event to so-called prophesies...AFTER AN EVENT HAPPENED.
    "Religion is a heavy suitcase: all you have to do is put it down."
    -----------------------------------------------------------
    "I have read the bible...more than once. I was not impressed nor was I so moved to give up my ability to think for myself and surrender my knowledge of facts for the unfounded belief in a mythical sky-fairy." - Me.

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