+ Reply to Thread
Results 1 to 14 of 14

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Posts
    3,088

    Ex-Taliban NOW YALE Student

    Hi all...

    If this has already been discussed somewhere in another thread, please excuse this post and KINDLY direct me to that thread.. Thanks.

    Most of the BS that is going on in this country right now simply infuriates me... I dispise Bush - the economy sucks - it has costs me $1600 to heat my home this winter - blah, blah, blah...

    But being that I live and work near Yale University, I find this situation very alarming....


    This is TRUE... Hashemi IS HERE... I have been trying to find out WHY & HOW - but no one is talking...

    He has a 4th grade education & CANNOT get a degree... How did he get into Yale?? WHY IS HE HERE???? Where does Homeland Security come into all of this?????????


    Taliban Spokesman
    Now Yale Student

    Jihadi Turns Bulldog


    The Wall Street Journal Editorial Page
    2-28-6

    The Taliban's former spokesman is now a Yale student. Anyone see a problem with that?

    Never has an article made me blink with astonishment as much as when I read in yesterday's New York Times magazine that Sayed Rahmatullah Hashemi, former ambassador-at-large for the Taliban, is now studying at Yale on a U.S. student visa. This is taking the obsession that U.S. universities have with promoting diversity a bit too far.

    Something is very wrong at our elite universities. Last week Larry Summers resigned as president of Harvard when it became clear he would lose a no-confidence vote held by politically correct faculty members furious at his efforts to allow ROTC on campus, his opposition to a drive to have Harvard divest itself of corporate investments in Israel, and his efforts to make professors work harder. Now Yale is giving a first-class education to an erstwhile high official in one of the most evil regimes of the latter half of the 20th century--the government that harbored the terrorists who attacked America on Sept. 11, 2001.

    "In some ways," Mr. Rahmatullah told the New York Times. "I'm the luckiest person in the world. I could have ended up in Guantanamo Bay. Instead I ended up at Yale." One of the courses he has taken is called Terrorism-Past, Present and Future.

    Many foreign readers of the Times will no doubt snicker at the revelation that naive Yale administrators scrambled to admit Mr. Rahmatullah. The Times reported that Yale "had another foreigner of Rahmatullah's caliber apply for special-student status." Richard Shaw, Yale's dean of undergraduate admissions, told the Times that "we lost him to Harvard," and "I didn't want that to happen again."

    In the spring of 2001, I was one of several writers at The Wall Street Journal who interviewed Mr. Rahmatullah at our offices across the street from the World Trade Center. His official title was second foreign secretary; his mission was to explain the regime's decision to rid the country of two 1,000-year-old towering statues of Buddha carved out of rock 90 miles from the Afghan capital, Kabul. The archeological treasures were considered the greatest remaining examples of third- and fifth-century Greco-Indian art in the world. But Taliban leader Mullah Omar had ordered all statues in the country destroyed, calling them idols of infidels and repugnant to Islam.

    Even Muslim nations like Pakistan denounced the move. Mr. Rahmatullah, who at the time claimed to be 24 but now says he was lying about his age and was actually two years younger, cut a curious figure in our office. He wore a traditional Afghan turban and white baggy pants and sported a full beard. His English, while sometimes elliptical, was smooth and colloquial. He made himself very clear when he said the West had no business worrying about the statues, because it had cut off trade and foreign aid to the Taliban. "When the world destroys the future of our children with economic sanctions, they have no right to worry about our past," he told us, according to my notes from the meeting.

    As for Osama bin Laden, Mr. Rahmatullah called the Saudi fugitive a "guest" of his government and said it hadn't been proved that bin Laden was linked to any terrorist acts, despite his indictment in the U.S. for planning the 1998 bombings of the U.S. embassies in Kenya and Tanzania. He said that if the embassy bombings were terrorist acts, then so was the Clinton administration's firing cruise missiles into his country in an attempt to kill bin Laden. "You killed 19 innocent people," he told us.

    After the meeting I walked him out. I vividly recall our stopping at a window as he stared up at the World Trade Center. We stood there for a minute chatting, but I don't recall what he said. He then left. I next thought about him a few months later, on Sept. 11, as I stood outside our office building covered in dust and debris staring at the remains of the towers that had just collapsed. I occasionally wondered what had happened to Mr. Rahmatullah. I assumed he either had died in the collapse of the Taliban regime, had been jailed, or was living quietly in the new, democratic Afghanistan.

    He visited other newspapers and spoke at universities, and the State Department had granted him a meeting with midlevel officials. None of the meetings went particularly well. At the University of Southern California, Mr. Rahmatullah expressed irritation with a question about statues that at that point hadn't yet been blown up. "You know, really, I am asked so much about these statues that I have a headache now," he moaned. "If I go back to Afghanistan, I will blow them."

    Carina Chocano, a writer for Salon.com who attended several of his speeches in the U.S., noted the hostility of many of his audiences. "A lesser publicist might have melted down," she wrote. "But the cool, unruffled and media-smart Hashemi instead spun his story into a contemporary parable of ironic iconoclasm," peppering his lectures with "statue jokes."

    But sometimes his humor really backfired. At a speech for the Atlantic Council, Mr. Rahmatullah was confronted by a woman in the audience who lifted the burkha she was wearing and chastised him for the Taliban's infamous treatment of women. "You have imprisoned the women--it's a horror, let me tell you," she cried. Mr. Rahmatullah responded with a sneer: "I'm really sorry to your husband. He might have a very difficult time with you."

    A videotape of his cutting remark became part of Michael Moore's "Fahrenheit 9/11," and infuriated the likes of Mavis Leno, wife of "Tonight Show" host Jay Leno. Mrs. Leno helped found the Feminist Majority's Campaign to Stop Gender Apartheid in Afghanistan and devoted countless hours to focusing public attention on the plight of Afghanistan's women and girls. "I will never, ever abandon these women," she often said before the Taliban's overthrow. Here's hoping she has saved some of her outrage for Yale's decision to welcome Mr. Rahmatullah with open arms.

    In his interview with the New York Times, Mr. Rahmatullah, said that if he had to do it all over, he would have been less "antagonistic" in his remarks during his U.S. road tour. "I regret the way I spoke sometimes. Now I would try to be softer. A little bit." Just a little?

    Today, when he is asked if Afghanistan would be better off if the Taliban were still in charge, Mr. Rahmatullah, has a mixed answer: "Economically, no. In terms of security, yes. In terms of general happiness, no. In the long-term interests of the country? I don't think so. I think the radicals were taking over and doing crazy stuff. I regret when people think of the Taliban and then think of me--that feeling people have after they know I was affiliated with them is painful to me." Note that the government official who represented the Taliban abroad now claims to have been only "affiliated" with them.

    Even though he evinces only semiregret for his actions in service to the Taliban, there is evidence that he has become quite a charmer. After the fall of the Taliban, he resumed a friendship he had developed with Mike Hoover, a CBS News cameraman who, according to a 2001 Associated Press story, had visited Afghanistan three times as a guest of the Taliban. Mr. Hoover inspired Mr. Rahmatullah to think about going to the U.S. to finish his studies. "I thought he could do a lot as a student/teacher," said Mr. Hoover. He persuaded Bob Schuster, an attorney friend of his from Wyoming who had gone to Yale, to help out. As the Times reported, "Schuster called the provost's office to ask how an ex-Taliban envoy with a fourth-grade education and a high-school equivalency degree might go about applying to one of the world's top universities."

    Intrigued by Mr. Rahmatullah, Dean Shaw arranged for his admission into a nondegree program for special students. He apparently has done well, so far pulling down a 3.33 grade-point average.

    I don't believe Mr. Rahmatullah had direct knowledge of the 9/11 plot, and I don't think he has ever killed anyone. I can appreciate that he is trying to rebuild his life. But he willingly and cheerfully served an evil regime in a manner that would have made Goebbels proud. That he was 22 at the time is little of an excuse. There are many poor, bright students--American and foreign alike--who would jump at the opportunity to attend Yale. Why should Mr. Rahmatullah go to the line ahead of all of them? That's a question Yale alumni should ask when their alma mater comes looking for contributions.

    President Bush, who already has a well-known disdain for Yale elitism from his student days there, may also have some questions. In the wake of his being blindsided by his own administration over the Dubai port deal, he should be interested in finding out exactly who at the State Department approved Mr. Rahmatullah's application for a student visa.

  2. #2
    umdkook Guest

    Re: Ex-Taliban NOW YALE Student

    3.33 GPA???? i pulled that freshman year through a haze of Mad Dog 20/20 and some sick homegrowns. I should be an ambassador at large!!!!!!


    this is interesting, but i have to be honest. if the US government has on problem with this guy now, and if he was never charged with any crimes or anything, AND he doesnt take the spot of some American kid born and raised, well then this is no problem in my book. unfortunately he does take the spot of some American, and that stinks.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Posts
    3,088

    Re: Ex-Taliban NOW YALE Student

    Quote Originally Posted by umdkook
    3.33 GPA???? i pulled that freshman year through a haze of Mad Dog 20/20 and some sick homegrowns. I should be an ambassador at large!!!!!!
    That's funny!!


    this is interesting, but i have to be honest. if the US government has on problem with this guy now, and if he was never charged with any crimes or anything, AND he doesnt take the spot of some American kid born and raised, well then this is no problem in my book. unfortunately he does take the spot of some American, and that stinks.
    The whole thing has a bad smell to me umdkook... we're supposed to alert the authorities if we see an unaccompanied package on the sidewalk... yet it's okay for the a top dog, ex-Taliban spokeman to be at Yale taking classes on terrorism???... I just can't get my brain wrapped around this one.

    And the fact that Yale refuses interviews to the news channels here doesn't help any either... why so secretive? What about Homeland Security? Is this someone that we WANT in this country? Why take the chance?.... It just seems careless to me.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Posts
    586

    Re: Ex-Taliban NOW YALE Student

    This is totally off topic, but:



    HELLO AND WELCOME BACK, C. V. !!!!!!!!
    :D :D :D


    I just had to do it. :p

    DeeDee1965

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Posts
    3,088

    Re: Ex-Taliban NOW YALE Student

    Quote Originally Posted by DeeDee1965
    This is totally off topic, but:



    HELLO AND WELCOME BACK, C. V. !!!!!!!!


    I just had to do it. :p

    DeeDee1965
    Hi DeeDee... Thank you :D

    I'll see you around - okay :)

    Susan

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Location
    Connecticut
    Posts
    51

    Re: Ex-Taliban NOW YALE Student

    I'm sure President Bush loves this kid and would love to see more just like him. I wouldn't be surprised if the president invites him to the White House and praises him on his courage to stand up against all the adversity.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Posts
    3,088

    Re: Ex-Taliban NOW YALE Student

    Quote Originally Posted by RedFusion
    I'm sure President Bush loves this kid and would love to see more just like him. I wouldn't be surprised if the president invites him to the White House and praises him on his courage to stand up against all the adversity.
    Agreed!!

    I wouldn't be surprised to to find out that Bush has something to do with this guy getting into Yale!! Bush was born in New Haven... went to Yale... hmmmmm

    Makes me wonder.. maybe that's why all of it is so hush-hush around here.....

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Location
    Connecticut
    Posts
    51

    Re: Ex-Taliban NOW YALE Student

    Quote Originally Posted by Connecticut Victim
    Agreed!!

    I wouldn't be surprised to to find out that Bush has something to do with this guy getting into Yale!! Bush was born in New Haven... went to Yale... hmmmmm

    Makes me wonder.. maybe that's why all of it is so hush-hush around here.....
    NO, it has nothing to do with anything like that. There's no conspiracies going on. I could just see the President taking this opportunity to pander to the MiddleEastern crowd.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Posts
    3,088

    Re: Ex-Taliban NOW YALE Student

    Quote Originally Posted by RedFusion
    NO, it has nothing to do with anything like that. There's no conspiracies going on. I could just see the President taking this opportunity to pander to the MiddleEastern crowd.
    I see that you are also here in CT - tell me... does this situation alarm you at all? Do you think it's okay that this guy is here?

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Location
    Connecticut
    Posts
    51

    Re: Ex-Taliban NOW YALE Student

    Quote Originally Posted by Connecticut Victim
    I see that you are also here in CT - tell me... does this situation alarm you at all? Do you think it's okay that this guy is here?
    Very alarming, yes. But its Yale we're talking about, one of the most liberal schools with the biggest liberal brainwashers as proffessors. So, I'm sure the faculty and most of the students admire him. It's definitely not ok for him to be here. He should be in Gitmo University.

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Posts
    3,088

    Re: Ex-Taliban NOW YALE Student

    Quote Originally Posted by RedFusion
    Very alarming, yes. But its Yale we're talking about, one of the most liberal schools with the biggest liberal brainwashers as proffessors. So, I'm sure the faculty and most of the students admire him. It's definitely not ok for him to be here. He should be in Gitmo University.
    My understanding is that the students were just as shocked as anyone else when the story broke - they had NO IDEA who this guy was. As you say, some were okay with it - others not so much...

    I asked one of our local news reporters why none of the local channels have covered this story, even though I saw a quite lengthy piece about it on the nationally broadcasted program "Inside Edition". He said they have tried - but Yale is not talking. He had learned, however, that Hashemi did not set off any alarms with Homeland Security because his name IS NOT ON "THE LIST"... okay - I feel better then :rolleyes: :rolleyes:

    This whole thing is insane!!

  12. #12
    davekross Guest

    Re: Ex-Taliban NOW YALE Student

    Osama used to be on your payroll and his niece will have a reality show on television soon.

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Posts
    12,866

    Re: Ex-Taliban NOW YALE Student

    Quote Originally Posted by RedFusion
    I'm sure President Bush loves this kid and would love to see more just like him. I wouldn't be surprised if the president invites him to the White House and praises him on his courage to stand up against all the adversity.

    He could introduce him to his two daughters. Perhaps call him "son" one day.

    :cool:

    Lady Mod

  14. #14
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Posts
    3,088

    Re: Ex-Taliban NOW YALE Student

    This article is on the front page of today's New Haven Register.
    Looks like things are HEATING UP - it's about time. :rolleyes:


    Ex-Taliban’s future at Yale has life of its own
    Mary E. O’Leary, Register Topics Editor
    04/09/2006

    It’s been six weeks since the world was reintroduced to Rahmatullah Hashemi, this time as a student at Yale University, a surprising update from his original appearance on the campus in 2001 as the spokesman for the much- reviled Taliban regime in Afghanistan.

    In this short time, the issue has generated a life of its own, filling the cable news shows, fed by an online columnist for the Wall Street Journal and by four Yale alumni dedicated, they say, to helping get Yale back on the right track by sending Hashemi packing.

    Now, a May 1 deadline is looming for Hashemi to apply for admittance to Yale’s regular undergraduate program. If he applies, Yale has 60 days to rule on his application. If he’s admitted, he would spend three more years on campus and could graduate with a degree.

    Critics of Hashemi are expected to ramp up the pressure to reject his application. Yale’s decision is expected to be watched closely on campus and around the world.

    Clinton Taylor, Yale class of 1996 and a doctoral candidate in political science at Stanford University, devotes up to three hours each night updating his blog and keeping the pressure on Yale to reject Hashemi if he applies to continue his studies at the Ivy League school.

    He estimates more than 100 people have sent in press-on nails to Yale as a way of protesting the Taliban’s rumored punishment of removing the fingernails of women who wore polish, but Yale’s not talking.

    "I’m a proud alumni. I don’t hate Yale. I’m not doing it to embarrass Yale or drag its name through the mud," Taylor said of what he sees as the university’s misguided decision to let Hashemi attend this year as a non-degree special student.

    He said he’s all for bringing in non-traditional students from the Middle East.

    "But, Yale is not a reform school. We are not here to fix someone’s past like that and I really don’t see any guarantee that he is repentant about his time in the Taliban," Taylor said in a phone interview.

    Repentance and whether Hashemi has demonstrated the "moral character" to attend the university are familiar themes sounded by students struggling to address the issue and by pundits convinced he is already beyond the pale.

    Silent in all this is Hashemi himself, who burst on the scene as the cover feature in the Sunday New York Times Magazine at the end of February. He has most recently associated himself with less radical elements of the Taliban and said he believed in democracy, free speech and women’s rights.

    Since then, at the advice of his American sponsors from Wyoming, chiefly CBS cameraman Mike Hoover, who has covered Afghanistan since the 1980s and used Hashemi as a guide, the 27-year-old has remained out of the spotlight.

    The rhetorical heat against keeping him here seems hotter the further away one goes from the campus, said many of the students, with people on both sides suggesting the issue is receiving way too much media attention.

    "I actually think there has been less discussion of this student on campus than on the "O’Reilly Factor," on Fox News, said junior Roger Low.



    But while few on the campus have actually gotten to know Hashemi, there certainly is interest in the topic.

    An online survey taken by The Yale Herald at the end of March, which it characterized as a "rough sketch" of student opinion, got 1,902 responses with 51.6 percent agreeing with the decision to admit Hashemi as a nondegree student.

    When asked if he should be allowed to stay under the Eli Whitney Students Program, which would make him eligible for a bachelor’s degree, the rate dropped to 42.41 percent with one-third against it and 21 percent neutral.

    Sixty percent of those who thought he should stay cited academic freedom as their reason, with 15 percent supporting "opening his mind to Western beliefs."

    Yale has issued a short statement on its decision, saying it hopes Hashemi’s courses "help him understand the broader context for the conflicts around the world."

    As for the critics, the university asked that they "also acknowledge that universities are places that must strive to increase understanding, especially of the most difficult issues that face the nation and the world."

    Political Science professor David Cameron, in a letter last week to the Yale Daily News, said Hashemi should not be considered for admission "unless he publicly disavows the actions of the Taliban regime and his role in it."

    He said this isn’t a test of political orthodoxy.

    "Hashemi was a spokesman for the Taliban, a regime that committed crimes against humanity, imprisoned, tortured, executed people for political and religious reasons and provided sanctuary for Osama bin Laden," Cameron said in a phone interview.

    But graduate student Eric Knibbs called Cameron’s letter "one massive non sequitur. On the one hand, Hashemi is guilty by two or three degrees of association and we can somehow clear up this problem by getting him to deny his support for the Taliban. It doesn’t make sense," he said.

    He compared it to the "McCarthy era when university professors were asked to sign a statement of allegiance. If we are going to put Hashemi to that test, they should put all of us to that test," Knibbs said.

    Charles Hill, a former diplomat and lecturer at Yale, is one of a group of professors who sees bringing Hashemi here as the essential role of a university. Beyond that, he said Hashemi is proving to be a "constructive presence."

    "Mr. Hashemi, who has never been charged with Taliban-style crimes, and who was reported by the American press to have been helpful to the U.S. forces during the 2003 Afghan campaign, is by every account a friendly and constructive presence here at Yale. He has chosen to shape his life on our side of the line," he said in a letter to Wall Street Journal.

    Low, a columnist for the Yale Daily News, wrote that he thinks Hashemi is being used as a symbol "by an army of conservative pundits ... to hack away at Yale’s reputation."

    On the other side of the spectrum, senior James Kirchick, who usually agrees politically with the conservative Hill, doesn’t in this instance.

    "I’m worried about what kind of message this sends to the rest of the world, particularly Afghanistan, that America’s most prestigious university is going to admit and celebrate someone like this," Kirchick said of the potential Hashemi will be here for three more years.

    He was also referring to quotes in the New York Times from Richard Shaw, the former admission director at Yale, who talked about how impressive Hashemi was in his interview and how he had lost "another foreigner of Rahmatullah’s caliber" to Harvard University and he wasn’t going to let that happen again.

    "It’s almost an insult to Yale students that this guy is made out to be so special. That his accomplishments in serving that regime are in any way amazing, I think is the height of a lack of understanding of the world," Kirchick said.

    Mark Oppenheimer, editor of the New Haven Advocate, and a classmate of Taylor’s, has come full circle on this. He initially was reluctant to question the decision of the admissions office.

    But not having read anything from Hashemi to convince him that the former official has redeemed himself, Oppenheimer thinks he should not be allowed to stay.

    "I’ve decided that there seems to be enough information on the public record to conclude that he has not reformed and if that is the case, I’d like for him not to be at Yale," he said.

    Still, he thinks the media’s focus on the university "represents a kind of sickness in our civic culture. ... We founded this country to not have a hereditary elite and then what do we do but coronate Yale and Harvard graduates as sort of inherently worthy of national attention and that’s just silly."

    Oppenheimer, whose politics are diametrically opposed to his friend Taylor’s, said he thinks Taylor’s "NailYale" crusade over Hashemi is off the mark.

    "To lavish so much attention on something so trivial in the grand scheme of things strikes me as misguided," he said.

    Yale spokesman Thomas Conroy explained that normally the school doesn’t confirm if a student is enrolled at Yale until the student starts classes, which in Hashemi’s case would be next September.

    What Yale will do, when and if Hashemi applies to stay, is not certain, but Yale corporation member Charles Ellis appears to have given some indication that the special student programs could be in for "significant change."

    In an e-mail posted on Taylor’s site, Ellis listed a few facts on the issue.

    "A careful review — certainly going on now — is likely to lead to significant change: Fewer folks allowed and stricter requirements and really close supervision," he wrote.

    "Yale is very fortunate to have wise and caring leaders — leaders who know that as often as they are very right, nobody’s perfect and they are always learning," Ellis concluded.

Similar Threads

  1. Student Loan Rates
    By Administrator in forum Political Scams
    Replies: 23
    Last Post: 06-20-2012, 12:18 PM
  2. Yale Surrenders to Sharia, Blocks Free Speech
    By pwrone in forum Political Scams
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: 10-12-2009, 12:28 AM
  3. Yale University celebrates science fraud
    By aguest in forum Science Scams
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: 09-17-2009, 08:03 AM
  4. Replies: 0
    Last Post: 11-28-2006, 06:32 AM
  5. Help out a university student...
    By A790 in forum Internet Scams
    Replies: 8
    Last Post: 11-02-2006, 02:51 PM

Tags for this Thread

Add / Edit Tags
000, 2001, account, actions, acts, address, administration, admit, admitted, advice, agreed, agrees, alert, allowed, alma, amazing, ambassador, america, american, another, answer, appears, approved, arms, army, article, associated press, association, attacked, attention, bad, bay, beard, bet, better, biggest, bin, bit, blown, book, brain, bright, bringing, broke, building, bulldog, burst, bush, cable, call, called, calling, campaign, cannot, capital, careful, case, center, cer, chan, chance, claims, class, cli, clinto, commit, con, conflicts, conservative, continue, corporate, corporation, correct, costs, country, courage, cover, crazy, crimes, crowd, cruise, culture, daughters, david, day, days, dea, dean, decided, decision, demons, department, des, destroyed, destroys, didn, difficult, diploma, diplomat, direct, director, diversity, doesn, dog, don, don’t, dow, dropped, dubai, ear, east, economic, edition, elements, embassy, ended, essential, examples, explained, face, factor, fall, famous, feature, fed, feel, feeling, finding, fix, focus, folks, forces, ford, foreign, fox, front, furious, future, general, girls, goebbels, government, gpa, grand, greatest, group, guarantee, guy, hand, happened, happiness, harder, held, helped, helping, hey, high, his, homeland, honest, horror, hot, hours, house, huma, husband, ico, ime, impressive, india, insult, interest, interview, investments, ion, issue, issues, jailed, jay, kenya, kid, killed, kind, laden, large, larry, larry summers, last, lead, leaders, league, lesser, letter, liberal, light, likes, line, lis, listed, living, local, long, looming, lose, lot, loves, lying, mad, mail, massive, mater, meeting, member, members, men, mike, mind, moore, moral, more, move, nation, national, nationally, nations, new york times, night, notes, office, official, officials, onli, open, opportunity, oral, ordered, original, outrage, overthrow, package, packing, page, pakistan, pas, payroll, perfect, person, piece, planning, point, politically, poor, pos, post, posted, potential, praises, presiden, president, president bush, problem, proved, pulled, punishment, question, questions, quote, quotes, reality, reason, reasons, receiving, red, reform, refuses, regime, regimes, register, regular, religious, remarks, reporters, resigned, responses, richard, rock, roger, role, roy, secretary, sends, sense, sept, september, served, service, set, shaw, short, show, shows, sick, sign, simply, site, son, soo, sorry, special, spend, spokesman, spot, spotlight, spring, stand, star, starts, state, state department, status, stay, stinks, stood, story, street, student, students, style, sucks, sul, summers, sunday, supervision, supporting, survey, taken, taliban, talking, tanzania, teacher, television, text, the new york times, the wall, they, thinks, thought, thread, time, times, title, today, told, tonight, top, top universities., tortured, totally, tour, towers, track, trade, treatment, update, urban, victim, visa, wall, watched, ways, wearing, week, weeks, welcome, west, western, white, white house, win, winter, wise, woma, wore, worthy, wrong, year, years, yesterday, york

View Tag Cloud

Bookmarks

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may post new threads
  • You may post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may edit your posts
  •