+ Reply to Thread
Results 1 to 3 of 3

  1. #1
    sojustask's Avatar
    sojustask is offline The Late, Great Lady Mod - Retired User Rank
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Posts
    12,866

    How About a Fresh Helping of Secrecy?

    Doesn't it just make you wonder what it is they are really trying to hide? :D
    ************************************************** *****
    How About a Fresh Helping of Secrecy?

    Within an administration besotted with secrecy, it is heartening to find the National Archives inviting critical notice of the way intelligence agencies have been secretly denying public access to thousands of previously declassified documents. The archives director, Allen Weinstein, has heeded the complaints of historians and politely asked agencies to put their reclassification mania on hold while an audit is completed on the damage done thus far to the public's right to know.

    The secretive review process, authorized in the Clinton administration to address mistakes made in declassification, has taken off like a fox hunt during the Bush administration. Each day, 30 intelligence reviewers work on the archives.

    Historians discovered that the process was reaching ludicrous proportions. Why should a 1948 intelligence scheme to float propaganda balloons across the Iron Curtain be relabeled as secret in 2001, five years after it had finally been made public? And why should a 1960's report on communism in Mexico be restamped secret by an agency better preoccupied with the war on terror?

    Some of the snatching back makes sense from a cynical point of view, like the secret estimate in 1950 forever embarrassing to intelligence professionals that China's intervention in Korea was "not probable." Historians concede that some documents about explosives technology, for example deserve reclassification. But the extent and fervor of the operation seem suspiciously in sync with the White House's obsession with secrecy at any cost.

    Intelligence and archives officials agreed this week to cooperate in search of a better program. Mr. Weinstein set the only acceptable benchmark in a democracy when he emphasized that the public's trust "must be earned and cannot be finessed by protecting documents from release."

    .

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Posts
    622

    Re: How About a Fresh Helping of Secrecy?

    Quote Originally Posted by sojustask
    Doesn't it just make you wonder what it is they are really trying to hide? :D
    ************************************************** *****
    How About a Fresh Helping of Secrecy?

    Within an administration besotted with secrecy, it is heartening to find the National Archives inviting critical notice of the way intelligence agencies have been secretly denying public access to thousands of previously declassified documents. The archives director, Allen Weinstein, has heeded the complaints of historians and politely asked agencies to put their reclassification mania on hold while an audit is completed on the damage done thus far to the public's right to know.

    The secretive review process, authorized in the Clinton administration to address mistakes made in declassification, has taken off like a fox hunt during the Bush administration. Each day, 30 intelligence reviewers work on the archives.

    Historians discovered that the process was reaching ludicrous proportions. Why should a 1948 intelligence scheme to float propaganda balloons across the Iron Curtain be relabeled as secret in 2001, five years after it had finally been made public? And why should a 1960's report on communism in Mexico be restamped secret by an agency better preoccupied with the war on terror?

    Some of the snatching back makes sense from a cynical point of view, like the secret estimate in 1950 forever embarrassing to intelligence professionals that China's intervention in Korea was "not probable." Historians concede that some documents about explosives technology, for example deserve reclassification. But the extent and fervor of the operation seem suspiciously in sync with the White House's obsession with secrecy at any cost.

    Intelligence and archives officials agreed this week to cooperate in search of a better program. Mr. Weinstein set the only acceptable benchmark in a democracy when he emphasized that the public's trust "must be earned and cannot be finessed by protecting documents from release."

    .

    It's because our "government" commits so many crimes against humanity that they can't keep track of it all anymore. So they figure it's safer simply to blanket classify virtually everything. When we have a "government" that is so manically obsessed and pre-occupied with secrecy, it should speak volumes to us all about what and who these "people" really are. In fact, we haven't had a real government of the people, by the people and for the people for ages. We have Murder Incorporated impersonating a government.
    Last edited by dante; 03-12-2006 at 01:34 AM.

  3. #3
    umdkook Guest

    Re: How About a Fresh Helping of Secrecy?

    I know what the problem is, its those damn Zio-Nazis again. Good ole Weinstein is probably playing both sides, pretending to ask agencies to reveal information.
    Last edited by umdkook; 03-12-2006 at 06:28 AM. Reason: cause i can

Similar Threads

  1. Romney, the Senate GOP and the Right-Wing Secrecy Machine
    By Starchs in forum Political Scams
    Replies: 7
    Last Post: 08-03-2012, 04:34 PM
  2. In Secrecy
    By DTB57 in forum Work at Home Scams
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: 01-01-2012, 12:38 AM
  3. Why the secrecy?
    By Yeah Well Fine Then in forum Political Scams
    Replies: 11
    Last Post: 10-09-2009, 10:03 AM
  4. A Fixation With Secrecy
    By sojustask in forum Political Scams
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: 08-28-2006, 03:21 PM
  5. Bush Team Imposes Thick Veil of Secrecy
    By sojustask in forum Political Scams
    Replies: 4
    Last Post: 05-02-2006, 02:32 PM

Tags for this Thread

Bookmarks

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may post new threads
  • You may post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may edit your posts
  •