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  #1  
Old 11-01-2007, 10:55 AM
peregrine's Avatar
peregrine peregrine is offline
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Pilot Of Plane That Dropped A Bomb Dies

kudos to him for being able to sleep at night....thats a heavy load!!!

COLUMBUS, Ohio - Paul Tibbets, who piloted the B-29 bomber Enola Gay that dropped the atomic bomb on Hiroshima, died Thursday. He was 92 and insisted almost to his dying day that he had no regrets about the mission and slept just fine at night.

Tibbets died at his Columbus home, said Gerry Newhouse, a longtime friend. He suffered from a variety of health problems and had been in decline for two months.

Tibbets had requested no funeral and no headstone, fearing it would provide his detractors with a place to protest, Newhouse said.

Tibbets' historic mission in the plane named for his mother marked the beginning of the end of World War II and eliminated the need for what military planners feared would have been an extraordinarily bloody invasion of Japan. It was the first use of a nuclear weapon in wartime.

The plane and its crew of 14 dropped the five-ton "Little Boy" bomb on the morning of Aug. 6, 1945. The blast killed 70,000 to 100,000 people and injured countless others.

Three days later, the United States dropped a second nuclear bomb on Nagasaki, Japan, killing an estimated 40,000 people. Tibbets did not fly in that mission. The Japanese surrendered a few days later, ending the war.

"I knew when I got the assignment it was going to be an emotional thing," Tibbets told The Columbus Dispatch for a story on Aug. 6, 2005, the 60th anniversary of the bomb. "We had feelings, but we had to put them in the background. We knew it was going to kill people right and left. But my one driving interest was to do the best job I could so that we could end the killing as quickly as possible."

Tibbets, then a 30-year-old colonel, never expressed regret over his role. He said it was his patriotic duty and the right thing to do.

"I'm not proud that I killed 80,000 people, but I'm proud that I was able to start with nothing, plan it and have it work as perfectly as it did," he said in a 1975 interview.

"You've got to take stock and assess the situation at that time. We were at war. ... You use anything at your disposal."

He added: "I sleep clearly every night."

Paul Warfield Tibbets Jr. was born Feb. 23, 1915, in Quincy, Ill., and spent most of his boyhood in Miami.

He was a student at the University of Cincinnati's medical school when he decided to withdraw in 1937 to enlist in the Army Air Corps.

After the war, Tibbets said in 2005, he was dogged by rumors claiming he was in prison or had committed suicide.

"They said I was crazy, said I was a drunkard, in and out of institutions," he said. "At the time, I was running the National Crisis Center at the Pentagon."

Tibbets retired from the Air Force as a brigadier general in 1966. He later moved to Columbus, where he ran an air taxi service until he retired in 1985.

But his role in the bombing brought him fame - and infamy - throughout his life.

In 1976, he was criticized for re-enacting the bombing during an appearance at a Harlingen, Texas, air show. As he flew a B-29 Superfortress over the show, a bomb set off on the runway below created a mushroom cloud.

He said the display "was not intended to insult anybody," but the Japanese were outraged. The U.S. government later issued a formal apology.

Tibbets again defended the bombing in 1995, when an outcry erupted over a planned 50th anniversary exhibit of the Enola Gay at the Smithsonian Institution.

The museum had planned to mount an exhibit that would have examined the context of the bombing, including the discussion within the Truman administration of whether to use the bomb, the rejection of a demonstration bombing and the selection of the target.

Veterans groups objected that it paid too much attention to Japan's suffering and too little to Japan's brutality during and before World War II, and that it underestimated the number of Americans who would have perished in an invasion.

They said the bombing of Japan was an unmitigated blessing for the United States and its fighting men and the exhibit should say so.

Tibbets denounced it as "a damn big insult."

The museum changed its plan, and agreed to display the fuselage of the Enola Gay without commentary, context or analysis.

He told the Dispatch in 2005 he wanted his ashes scattered over the English Channel, where he loved to fly during the war.
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  #2  
Old 11-01-2007, 11:34 AM
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Re: Pilot Of Plane That Dropped A Bomb Dies

Quote:
Originally Posted by peregrine View Post
kudos to him for being able to sleep at night....thats a heavy load!!!

COLUMBUS, Ohio - Paul Tibbets, who piloted the B-29 bomber Enola Gay that dropped the atomic bomb on Hiroshima, died Thursday. He was 92 and insisted almost to his dying day that he had no regrets about the mission and slept just fine at night.

Tibbets died at his Columbus home, said Gerry Newhouse, a longtime friend. He suffered from a variety of health problems and had been in decline for two months.

Tibbets had requested no funeral and no headstone, fearing it would provide his detractors with a place to protest, Newhouse said.

Tibbets' historic mission in the plane named for his mother marked the beginning of the end of World War II and eliminated the need for what military planners feared would have been an extraordinarily bloody invasion of Japan. It was the first use of a nuclear weapon in wartime.

The plane and its crew of 14 dropped the five-ton "Little Boy" bomb on the morning of Aug. 6, 1945. The blast killed 70,000 to 100,000 people and injured countless others.

Three days later, the United States dropped a second nuclear bomb on Nagasaki, Japan, killing an estimated 40,000 people. Tibbets did not fly in that mission. The Japanese surrendered a few days later, ending the war.

"I knew when I got the assignment it was going to be an emotional thing," Tibbets told The Columbus Dispatch for a story on Aug. 6, 2005, the 60th anniversary of the bomb. "We had feelings, but we had to put them in the background. We knew it was going to kill people right and left. But my one driving interest was to do the best job I could so that we could end the killing as quickly as possible."

Tibbets, then a 30-year-old colonel, never expressed regret over his role. He said it was his patriotic duty and the right thing to do.

"I'm not proud that I killed 80,000 people, but I'm proud that I was able to start with nothing, plan it and have it work as perfectly as it did," he said in a 1975 interview.

"You've got to take stock and assess the situation at that time. We were at war. ... You use anything at your disposal."

He added: "I sleep clearly every night."

Paul Warfield Tibbets Jr. was born Feb. 23, 1915, in Quincy, Ill., and spent most of his boyhood in Miami.

He was a student at the University of Cincinnati's medical school when he decided to withdraw in 1937 to enlist in the Army Air Corps.

After the war, Tibbets said in 2005, he was dogged by rumors claiming he was in prison or had committed suicide.

"They said I was crazy, said I was a drunkard, in and out of institutions," he said. "At the time, I was running the National Crisis Center at the Pentagon."

Tibbets retired from the Air Force as a brigadier general in 1966. He later moved to Columbus, where he ran an air taxi service until he retired in 1985.

But his role in the bombing brought him fame - and infamy - throughout his life.

In 1976, he was criticized for re-enacting the bombing during an appearance at a Harlingen, Texas, air show. As he flew a B-29 Superfortress over the show, a bomb set off on the runway below created a mushroom cloud.

He said the display "was not intended to insult anybody," but the Japanese were outraged. The U.S. government later issued a formal apology.

Tibbets again defended the bombing in 1995, when an outcry erupted over a planned 50th anniversary exhibit of the Enola Gay at the Smithsonian Institution.

The museum had planned to mount an exhibit that would have examined the context of the bombing, including the discussion within the Truman administration of whether to use the bomb, the rejection of a demonstration bombing and the selection of the target.

Veterans groups objected that it paid too much attention to Japan's suffering and too little to Japan's brutality during and before World War II, and that it underestimated the number of Americans who would have perished in an invasion.

They said the bombing of Japan was an unmitigated blessing for the United States and its fighting men and the exhibit should say so.

Tibbets denounced it as "a damn big insult."

The museum changed its plan, and agreed to display the fuselage of the Enola Gay without commentary, context or analysis.

He told the Dispatch in 2005 he wanted his ashes scattered over the English Channel, where he loved to fly during the war.
The single most heinous act of terrorism in history.

Japan had been suing for peace months before this terrorist fvck attacked them.

His ashes should be flushed down the toilet and the lid nailed shut.

Surely, if there's a Hell, he's roasting right now in its deepest pit.
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Last edited by dchristie : 11-01-2007 at 11:37 AM.
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  #3  
Old 11-01-2007, 12:10 PM
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peregrine peregrine is offline
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Re: Pilot Of Plane That Dropped A Bomb Dies

Bush has some nerve...not wanting another country to have the 'bomb' yet we are the first country to actually use it ourselves....it simply blows the mind!!!!
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  #4  
Old 11-01-2007, 01:57 PM
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goodwitchofthesouth goodwitchofthesouth is offline
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Re: Pilot Of Plane That Dropped A Bomb Dies

Regarding the conscience of the pilot of "the" plane and anyone
wondering how he could sleep at night......I have to wonder if any of
the pilots in the planes that attacked Pearl Harbor had any sleep
problems. I doubt it.

War is a nasty, ugly and deadly thing......oops, that would go for the
government too, wouldnt it?
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PROMOTE SELF DEPORTATION.....ENFORCE OUR LAWS.:mad:

What are reparations? Making me pay
for something I had nothing to do with compensates no one
who suffered an injustice therefore I would be penalized for
something I didnt do and someone else would recieve a settlement
for an injury they did not suffer.[/b]

By D.B.

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  #5  
Old 11-01-2007, 10:33 PM
steve burns steve burns is offline
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Re: Pilot Of Plane That Dropped A Bomb Dies

:i agree:
Quote:
Originally Posted by peregrine View Post
Bush has some nerve...not wanting another country to have the 'bomb' yet we are the first country to actually use it ourselves....it simply blows the mind!!!!

Good thinking. We should let everyone have the bomb, even give them the technology. After all, whats fair is fair. If they use it to build missiles to blow us up, at least we did the right thing.
Tell that to the survivors of our country...if there are any.

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  #6  
Old 11-02-2007, 12:00 AM
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EagleOne EagleOne is offline
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Re: Pilot Of Plane That Dropped A Bomb Dies

Don't you just love all that compassion, understanding, caring, tolerance exhibited by dchristie. Now there is someone who understands what it means to be forgiving, as well as compasionate. His tolerance of others viewpoints is something to behold. His posts just make you go warm and fuzzy inside from such gentleness and loving thoughts, deeds and words. Takes it to another level all liberals should strive to achieve.

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  #7  
Old 11-02-2007, 10:25 AM
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goodwitchofthesouth goodwitchofthesouth is offline
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Re: Pilot Of Plane That Dropped A Bomb Dies

I think they already are, Eagle.:i agree:
__________________
Please dont lie, cheat or steal. The government doesnt
like competition. :D


PROMOTE SELF DEPORTATION.....ENFORCE OUR LAWS.:mad:

What are reparations? Making me pay
for something I had nothing to do with compensates no one
who suffered an injustice therefore I would be penalized for
something I didnt do and someone else would recieve a settlement
for an injury they did not suffer.[/b]

By D.B.

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  #8  
Old 11-02-2007, 10:47 AM
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peregrine peregrine is offline
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Re: Pilot Of Plane That Dropped A Bomb Dies

Quote:
Originally Posted by steve burns View Post
:i agree:


Good thinking. We should let everyone have the bomb, even give them the technology. After all, whats fair is fair. If they use it to build missiles to blow us up, at least we did the right thing.
Tell that to the survivors of our country...if there are any.
I suppose you are being sarcastic but thats ok....it would be a lose lose for the planet...doubt there would be any survivors.
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Last edited by peregrine : 11-02-2007 at 10:52 AM.
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  #9  
Old 11-02-2007, 12:28 PM
steve burns steve burns is offline
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Re: Pilot Of Plane That Dropped A Bomb Dies

Quote:
Originally Posted by peregrine View Post
I suppose you are being sarcastic but thats ok....it would be a lose lose for the planet...doubt there would be any survivors.
What I mean to say is:
There should be no nuclear weapons for any country.
Failing that, if there is a country with them, I would rather be in that country. As far as anyone not having them, I would rather be unfair than unsafe.

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  #10  
Old 11-02-2007, 02:05 PM
rubyslippers rubyslippers is offline
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Re: Pilot Of Plane That Dropped A Bomb Dies

Quote:
Originally Posted by peregrine View Post
kudos to him for being able to sleep at night....thats a heavy load!!!

COLUMBUS, Ohio - Paul Tibbets, who piloted the B-29 bomber Enola Gay that dropped the atomic bomb on Hiroshima, died Thursday. He was 92 and insisted almost to his dying day that he had no regrets about the mission and slept just fine at night.

Tibbets died at his Columbus home, said Gerry Newhouse, a longtime friend. He suffered from a variety of health problems and had been in decline for two months.

Tibbets had requested no funeral and no headstone, fearing it would provide his detractors with a place to protest, Newhouse said.

Tibbets' historic mission in the plane named for his mother marked the beginning of the end of World War II and eliminated the need for what military planners feared would have been an extraordinarily bloody invasion of Japan. It was the first use of a nuclear weapon in wartime.

The plane and its crew of 14 dropped the five-ton "Little Boy" bomb on the morning of Aug. 6, 1945. The blast killed 70,000 to 100,000 people and injured countless others.

Three days later, the United States dropped a second nuclear bomb on Nagasaki, Japan, killing an estimated 40,000 people. Tibbets did not fly in that mission. The Japanese surrendered a few days later, ending the war.

"I knew when I got the assignment it was going to be an emotional thing," Tibbets told The Columbus Dispatch for a story on Aug. 6, 2005, the 60th anniversary of the bomb. "We had feelings, but we had to put them in the background. We knew it was going to kill people right and left. But my one driving interest was to do the best job I could so that we could end the killing as quickly as possible."

Tibbets, then a 30-year-old colonel, never expressed regret over his role. He said it was his patriotic duty and the right thing to do.

"I'm not proud that I killed 80,000 people, but I'm proud that I was able to start with nothing, plan it and have it work as perfectly as it did," he said in a 1975 interview.

"You've got to take stock and assess the situation at that time. We were at war. ... You use anything at your disposal."

He added: "I sleep clearly every night."

Paul Warfield Tibbets Jr. was born Feb. 23, 1915, in Quincy, Ill., and spent most of his boyhood in Miami.

He was a student at the University of Cincinnati's medical school when he decided to withdraw in 1937 to enlist in the Army Air Corps.

After the war, Tibbets said in 2005, he was dogged by rumors claiming he was in prison or had committed suicide.

"They said I was crazy, said I was a drunkard, in and out of institutions," he said. "At the time, I was running the National Crisis Center at the Pentagon."

Tibbets retired from the Air Force as a brigadier general in 1966. He later moved to Columbus, where he ran an air taxi service until he retired in 1985.

But his role in the bombing brought him fame - and infamy - throughout his life.

In 1976, he was criticized for re-enacting the bombing during an appearance at a Harlingen, Texas, air show. As he flew a B-29 Superfortress over the show, a bomb set off on the runway below created a mushroom cloud.

He said the display "was not intended to insult anybody," but the Japanese were outraged. The U.S. government later issued a formal apology.

Tibbets again defended the bombing in 1995, when an outcry erupted over a planned 50th anniversary exhibit of the Enola Gay at the Smithsonian Institution.

The museum had planned to mount an exhibit that would have examined the context of the bombing, including the discussion within the Truman administration of whether to use the bomb, the rejection of a demonstration bombing and the selection of the target.

Veterans groups objected that it paid too much attention to Japan's suffering and too little to Japan's brutality during and before World War II, and that it underestimated the number of Americans who would have perished in an invasion.

They said the bombing of Japan was an unmitigated blessing for the United States and its fighting men and the exhibit should say so.

Tibbets denounced it as "a damn big insult."

The museum changed its plan, and agreed to display the fuselage of the Enola Gay without commentary, context or analysis.

He told the Dispatch in 2005 he wanted his ashes scattered over the English Channel, where he loved to fly during the war.
The loss of a truly GREAT American both an officer and a gentleman performing his duty to defeat our enemy at the time.

And did anyone forget the japanese started the war, commited atrocities across Asia, killed our soldiers when they were POW's and were out with the rest of the Axis to destroy freedom.

Add to that all the signs were that they were going to go down fighting to the death every man, woman and child in Japan. As for their peace overtures what part of UNCONDITIONAL SURRENDER didn't they get and even after we dropped the first Atomic Bomb they were debating the matter of surrendering. A faction still wanted to fight on no matter what.

What we did saved lives on our side, on the Japanese side and we did what we had to do. In the case of Germany and Italy there was a clear understanding that we invaded your capital or entered your country it was pretty much over. With Japan we had no idea what we had to do to make them break.

So kudos for this man and the crews that delivered the bomb, the swcientists that designed it and to the fine president Truman who ordered its use.

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  #11  
Old 11-02-2007, 09:13 PM
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dchristie dchristie is offline
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Re: Pilot Of Plane That Dropped A Bomb Dies

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Originally Posted by rubyslippers View Post
The loss of a truly GREAT American both an officer and a gentleman performing his duty to defeat our enemy at the time.

And did anyone forget the japanese started the war, commited atrocities across Asia, killed our soldiers when they were POW's and were out with the rest of the Axis to destroy freedom.

Add to that all the signs were that they were going to go down fighting to the death every man, woman and child in Japan. As for their peace overtures what part of UNCONDITIONAL SURRENDER didn't they get and even after we dropped the first Atomic Bomb they were debating the matter of surrendering. A faction still wanted to fight on no matter what.

What we did saved lives on our side, on the Japanese side and we did what we had to do. In the case of Germany and Italy there was a clear understanding that we invaded your capital or entered your country it was pretty much over. With Japan we had no idea what we had to do to make them break.

So kudos for this man and the crews that delivered the bomb, the swcientists that designed it and to the fine president Truman who ordered its use.
Only in America do you find the type of hopelessly depraved and callous Neanderthal mentality that would consider the incineration of 100,000 human souls in a nuclear inferno to be the the act of a "Great American". Only in America do you encounter the kind of shameless hypocrite who can call those who kill 3000 people "terrorists" while those who kill 200,000 are humanitarians because of their uniform. Ha!

Tibbets was the kind of guy who had no problem exterminating as many men, women and children as was technologically possible whether they be on a school bus, a crowded city street or an office building in a densely populated urban area simply because he was following orders. Where have we hear that before?

The final results are always that the losers are written into history as "The Bad Guys" by the winners who clothe themselves in the vestments of saints.

I get nauseous when I hear these stupid canards about Peal Harbor and the potential loss of life from an invasion of Japan as an excuse and justification for being the only country to have ever used nuclear weapons against a civilian population....even while we wag our bloody sanctimonious fingers at others for allegedly aspiring towards the same technology. This is a sheer display of brazen two faced gall in its most unrepentant arrogant form that simply guarantees other nations will do anything to protect themselves from the same type of genocidal psychos who brought us Hiroshima, Nagasaki and the post quoted above.

We need military officers who, unlike Tibbets, will have the courage to say "Hell No". That's REAL courage.
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Last edited by dchristie : 11-02-2007 at 09:31 PM.
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  #12  
Old 11-02-2007, 09:40 PM
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Re: Pilot Of Plane That Dropped A Bomb Dies

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Originally Posted by dchristie View Post
The final results are always that the losers are written into history as "The Bad Guys" by the winners who clothe themselves in the vestments of saints.
What "saintly" behaviors did the Japanese manifest in the Phillipines, Burma & China? We are, obviously, in need of enlightment.

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Old 11-02-2007, 09:45 PM
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Re: Pilot Of Plane That Dropped A Bomb Dies

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What "saintly" behaviors did the Japanese manifest in the Phillipines, Burma & China? We are, obviously, in need of enlightment.
What's your point? That it provides justification for your own inhumanity? I'd rather keep mine, thanks.
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Old 11-02-2007, 10:13 PM
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Re: Pilot Of Plane That Dropped A Bomb Dies

Reaching a conditional surrender negotiation with Japan is far better than dropping a friggin' ATOMIC BOMB ON A POPULATED CITY. The real reason the bomb was dropped was to show off the the world, especially the Soviet Union, what the United States was capable of. Didn't work too well; the USSR got their own A-Bombs 4 years later. The entire incident was just an attempt to show off, at the expense of over 100,000 lives.

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  #15  
Old 11-02-2007, 10:23 PM
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Re: Pilot Of Plane That Dropped A Bomb Dies

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Originally Posted by Blue Crab of PAIN!!! View Post
Reaching a conditional surrender negotiation with Japan is far better than dropping a friggin' ATOMIC BOMB ON A POPULATED CITY. The real reason the bomb was dropped was to show off the the world, especially the Soviet Union, what the United States was capable of. Didn't work too well; the USSR got their own A-Bombs 4 years later. The entire incident was just an attempt to show off, at the expense of over 100,000 lives.
Correctomundo. It wasn't, by any means, a military necessity. We had the entire nation of Japan blockaded. And like you said, what type of people would incinerate hundreds of thousands based on nothing but semantics? The only point of contention in the surrender negotiations was whether or not they could keep the Emperor. In the end, they kept the Emperor anyway which ceased to be the condition after 200,000 people had been murdered by Openheimer, Teller, Tibbets and their bunch. It was nothing but a grotesque and macabre stunt for the purpose of using Japanese cities as a laboratory experiment and intimidating the Soviets. It intimidated them so much they went to work on developing 40,000 warheads with 1000 times the destructive power of Hiroshima aimed on a hair trigger at every American.
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Last edited by dchristie : 11-02-2007 at 10:28 PM.
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Old 11-03-2007, 01:52 AM
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Re: Pilot Of Plane That Dropped A Bomb Dies

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Originally Posted by dchristie View Post
Correctomundo. It wasn't, by any means, a military necessity. We had the entire nation of Japan blockaded. And like you said, what type of people would incinerate hundreds of thousands based on nothing but semantics? The only point of contention in the surrender negotiations was whether or not they could keep the Emperor. In the end, they kept the Emperor anyway which ceased to be the condition after 200,000 people had been murdered by Openheimer, Teller, Tibbets and their bunch. It was nothing but a grotesque and macabre stunt for the purpose of using Japanese cities as a laboratory experiment and intimidating the Soviets. It intimidated them so much they went to work on developing 40,000 warheads with 1000 times the destructive power of Hiroshima aimed on a hair trigger at every American.
Wow! I just witnessed a first. DC was talking out of both orifices at the same time. Well at least his lips were moving.

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Old 11-03-2007, 08:03 PM
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Re: Pilot Of Plane That Dropped A Bomb Dies

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What's your point? That it provides justification for your own inhumanity? I'd rather keep mine, thanks.
My point was clarification of your statement:

"The final results are always that the losers are written into history as "The Bad Guys" by the winners who clothe themselves in the vestments of saints. "

Are you saying your statement is invalid? If not then please clarify it.

Personally, I believe you're applying the social mores of today to 1945. Viewing an environment of 'total war' through 'limited war' lenses.

Granted... it is simply your opinion in an internet forum... so there is no 'right or wrong'... only opinions.

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Old 11-03-2007, 08:15 PM
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Re: Pilot Of Plane That Dropped A Bomb Dies

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Originally Posted by goodwitchofthesouth View Post
War is a nasty, ugly and deadly thing......
Absolutely... or as Lee said at Fredericksburg (I think)
"It is well that war is so terrible -- lest we should grow too fond of it."


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