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  #1  
Old 04-24-2010, 06:42 AM
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First Europe, then the US – now abuse claims sweep

http://www.independent.co.uk/news/wo...a-1950716.html


The paedophile priest scandal currently enveloping the Vatican has
spread to one of the most Catholic areas of the world following a
string of new abuse revelations throughout Latin America.

Reports of priests raping or abusing minors have now emerged in
Brazil, Bolivia, Uruguay, Mexico and Chile causing growing anger in a
continent that is home to nearly half the world’s Catholics.

In Brazil an 83-year-old priest has been arrested after he was
secretly filmed in bed with a 19-year-old altar boy. The footage was
broadcast on national television networks prompting a police
investigation which led to the arrest of Monsignor Luiz Marques
Barbosa and two other priests in the north eastern state of Alagoas.
They have since been accused of abusing boys as young as 12 and have
been suspended by their diocesan bishop.

The Catholic Church in Chile confirmed this week that there have been
20 alleged or confirmed cases of child abuse by priests. At a press
conference yesterday, Monsignor Alejandro Goic, the head of Chile’s
bishops’ conference, apologised and vowed to crack down on any priests
who had abused children.

"There is no place in the priesthood for those who abuse minors, and
there is nothing that can justify this crime," he said.

Reporters in Uruguay have also discovered that a priest who had been
charged with raping three children in Bolivia had returned to his
homeland and was living openly with full knowledge of local church
officials.


Juan Jose Santana has been on the run from Bolivian authorities since
May 2008. An Interpol warrant has been issued for his arrest but
reporters from the La Republica newspaper tracked him down to his home
town. Asked if allegations that he had abused children were true, the
newspaper reported that Santana said, "It's true. That's all I can
say... You know something? I'm dead."

The Mexican church is already reeling from revelations surrounding the
Legionnaires of Christ, a shadowy but powerful Catholic sect which was
founded by the charismatic Maciel Degollado. Following his death in
2008 it emerged that the staunchly conservative theologian had a
series of sexual affairs with men, women and boys in many different
parts of the world.


This week the Mexican church has also been drawn into a potentially
costly legal battle in the United States. An anonymous Mexican citizen
has filed papers suing Catholic cardinals in Mexico City and Los
Angeles, accusing them of purposely hiding the background of a Mexican
priest accused of sexually abusing dozens of children.

Speaking at his weekly public audience in St Peter’s Square today,
Pope Benedict XVI spoke about meeting abuse victims during his weekend
trip to Malta, in what was a rare public statement on the paedophile
scandal.

"I wanted to meet some people who were victims of abuse by members of
the clergy,” he said. “I shared with them their suffering and with
emotion I prayed with them, promising them action on the part of the
Church."

So far the kind of widespread anti-church outrage seen in European
countries currently experiencing abuse scandals has yet to materialise
in Latin America. But the drip of allegations are potentially damaging
to an institution that is already trying to counter the growing
influence of evangelical missionaries.

Approximately 71 percent of South Americans consider themselves
Catholic, down from 80 percent in 1995. The proportion of people who
consider themselves evangelical or Protestant, meanwhile, rose from 3
percent to 13 percent in the same period.

Professor Manuel Vasquez, an expert in Latin American religion at the
University of Florida, says the Catholic Church still has a “strong
moral standing” in South America because of its history in confronting
despotic regimes throughout the late twentieth century.

“That may insulate the Catholic Church from some of the dramatic anger
that we’ve seen in Europe but it’s also a two-edged sword,” he
explained. “The Church’s moral power comes through confronting
governments on the issue of impunity. But if people believe the Church
is now itself acting with impunity, it leaves them open to allegations
of double standards.”

Church Scandals in Latin America

Uruguay

Juan Jose Santana, a priest, has been on the run from the Bolivian
authorities since May 2008, charged with raping three children. He
returned to Uruguay where he was living openly until he was tracked
down by reporters.

Mexico

The secrets of Maciel Degollado, the head of the powerful Legionnaires
of Christ sect, came to light after his death in 2008. The staunchly
conservative theologian had sexual affairs with men, women and boys in
many different parts of the world.

Chile

The Catholic Church in Chile has confired 20 alleged or confirmed
cases of child abuse by priests. The head of Chile's bishops'
conference said that nothing could excuse such crimes and promised to
crack down on them.
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Old 04-24-2010, 10:02 AM
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Re: First Europe, then the US – now abuse claims s

Quote:
Originally Posted by Yeah Well Fine Then View Post
http://www.independent.co.uk/news/wo...a-1950716.html


The paedophile priest scandal currently enveloping the Vatican has
spread to one of the most Catholic areas of the world following a
string of new abuse revelations throughout Latin America.

Reports of priests raping or abusing minors have now emerged in
Brazil, Bolivia, Uruguay, Mexico and Chile causing growing anger in a
continent that is home to nearly half the world’s Catholics.

In Brazil an 83-year-old priest has been arrested after he was
secretly filmed in bed with a 19-year-old altar boy. The footage was
broadcast on national television networks prompting a police
investigation which led to the arrest of Monsignor Luiz Marques
Barbosa and two other priests in the north eastern state of Alagoas.
They have since been accused of abusing boys as young as 12 and have
been suspended by their diocesan bishop.

The Catholic Church in Chile confirmed this week that there have been
20 alleged or confirmed cases of child abuse by priests. At a press
conference yesterday, Monsignor Alejandro Goic, the head of Chile’s
bishops’ conference, apologised and vowed to crack down on any priests
who had abused children.

"There is no place in the priesthood for those who abuse minors, and
there is nothing that can justify this crime," he said.

Reporters in Uruguay have also discovered that a priest who had been
charged with raping three children in Bolivia had returned to his
homeland and was living openly with full knowledge of local church
officials.

Juan Jose Santana has been on the run from Bolivian authorities since
May 2008. An Interpol warrant has been issued for his arrest but
reporters from the La Republica newspaper tracked him down to his home
town. Asked if allegations that he had abused children were true, the
newspaper reported that Santana said, "It's true. That's all I can
say... You know something? I'm dead."

The Mexican church is already reeling from revelations surrounding the
Legionnaires of Christ, a shadowy but powerful Catholic sect which was
founded by the charismatic Maciel Degollado. Following his death in
2008 it emerged that the staunchly conservative theologian had a
series of sexual affairs with men, women and boys in many different
parts of the world.

This week the Mexican church has also been drawn into a potentially
costly legal battle in the United States. An anonymous Mexican citizen
has filed papers suing Catholic cardinals in Mexico City and Los
Angeles, accusing them of purposely hiding the background of a Mexican
priest accused of sexually abusing dozens of children.

Speaking at his weekly public audience in St Peter’s Square today,
Pope Benedict XVI spoke about meeting abuse victims during his weekend
trip to Malta, in what was a rare public statement on the paedophile
scandal.

"I wanted to meet some people who were victims of abuse by members of
the clergy,” he said. “I shared with them their suffering and with
emotion I prayed with them, promising them action on the part of the
Church."

So far the kind of widespread anti-church outrage seen in European
countries currently experiencing abuse scandals has yet to materialise
in Latin America. But the drip of allegations are potentially damaging
to an institution that is already trying to counter the growing
influence of evangelical missionaries.

Approximately 71 percent of South Americans consider themselves
Catholic, down from 80 percent in 1995. The proportion of people who
consider themselves evangelical or Protestant, meanwhile, rose from 3
percent to 13 percent in the same period.

Professor Manuel Vasquez, an expert in Latin American religion at the
University of Florida, says the Catholic Church still has a “strong
moral standing” in South America because of its history in confronting
despotic regimes throughout the late twentieth century.

“That may insulate the Catholic Church from some of the dramatic anger
that we’ve seen in Europe but it’s also a two-edged sword,” he
explained. “The Church’s moral power comes through confronting
governments on the issue of impunity. But if people believe the Church
is now itself acting with impunity, it leaves them open to allegations
of double standards.”

Church Scandals in Latin America

Uruguay

Juan Jose Santana, a priest, has been on the run from the Bolivian
authorities since May 2008, charged with raping three children. He
returned to Uruguay where he was living openly until he was tracked
down by reporters.

Mexico

The secrets of Maciel Degollado, the head of the powerful Legionnaires
of Christ sect, came to light after his death in 2008. The staunchly
conservative theologian had sexual affairs with men, women and boys in
many different parts of the world.

Chile

The Catholic Church in Chile has confired 20 alleged or confirmed
cases of child abuse by priests. The head of Chile's bishops'
conference said that nothing could excuse such crimes and promised to
crack down on them.

AND THIS MAY ONLY BE THE TIP OF THE ICEBERG

  #3  
Old 04-24-2010, 11:00 AM
Tulip Tulip is offline
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Re: First Europe, then the US – now abuse claims s

It is obvious to me that the abuse of children has been going on by clergy of the Roman Catholic Church all over the world.

The church has chosen to cover up the abuse over many years and now thanks to very brave souls the truth is being uncovered.

The more I learn the angrier I get. The more I read I understand how many knew of these abuses and did nothing.

When the church was facing public ridicule then they chose to set some rules. What would be going on today if these brave people who spoke out and told their stories of sexual abuse would not have come forward?

I want all offenses to be uncovered and exposed. I want all guilty to be punished.

The article I posted has some very good information. Two things I highlighted in this scandal is about sex and the higher ups of the Roman Catholic Church are all male. I do think the cover up of this scandal over the years has to do with the scandal being sexual and males are making the decisions on how to handle the actions taken for correcting the crimes happening in the Roman Catholic Church. The church has no women in it's clergy or high ranking posistions. Also sex is forbidden to priests and nuns.
They chose to hide the sexual abuse of children to cover up how the Roman Catholic Church may need to take a look at the way their strict sexual rules have caused so much harm to their children. I do not see how the churches strict rules about sex do not play a part in priests and nuns having psychological sexual disorders and the churches decision to cover all of this up.
Indulgence

by Hendrik Hertzberg April 19, 2010

On October 31, 1517, a Roman Catholic priest and theologian, Dr. Martin Luther, put the finishing touches on a series of bullet points and, legend has it, nailed the result to the door of the castle church in Wittenberg, Germany—the equivalent, for the time and place, of uploading a particularly explosive blog post. Luther’s was a protest against the sale of chits that were claimed to entitle buyers or their designees to shorter stays in Purgatory. Such chits, known as indulgences, were being hawked as part of Pope Leo X’s fund-raising drive for the renovation of St. Peter’s Basilica. The “Ninety-five Theses on the Power and Efficacy of Indulgences” touched off a high-stakes flame war that rapidly devolved into the real thing, with actual wars, actual flames, and actual stakes. The theological clash that sundered Christendom didn’t just change the face of Western religion; it birthed the modern world.
Half a millennium later, the present agony of Catholicism is very far from being in the same league, even though the National Catholic Reporter has called it “the largest institutional crisis in centuries, possibly in Church history.” The crisis is not about doctrine, at least not directly. It’s about administration; it’s about the structure of power within the Catholic Church; it’s about the Church’s insular, self-protective clerical culture. And, of course, like nearly every one of the controversies that preoccupy and bedevil the Church—abortion, stem-cell research, contraception, celibacy, marriage and divorce and affectional orientation—it’s about sex.
It’s also about indulgence—the institutional indulgence, fitful but systemic, of the sexual exploitation of children by priests. The pattern broke into public consciousness in the United States a quarter of a century ago, when a Louisiana priest pleaded guilty to thirty-three counts of crimes against children and was sentenced to prison. Since then, there have been thousands of such cases, civil and criminal, involving many thousands of children and leading to legal settlements that have amounted to more than two billion dollars and have driven several dioceses into bankruptcy. In 1992, Richard Sipe, a Catholic psychotherapist and researcher who served for eighteen years as a priest and Benedictine monk, told a conference of victims that “the current revelations of abuse are the tip of an iceberg, and if the problem is traced to its foundations the path will lead to the highest halls of the Vatican.”
America’s liberal system of tort law, along with the enterprising reporting of journalists at newspapers like the Boston Globe, brought the problem to light earlier here than elsewhere. But it can no longer be dismissed as an epiphenomenon of America’s sexual libertinism and religious indiscipline. In Ireland, for example, where Church-run orphanages and other institutions for children are supported by the state, a government commission reported last year that


the Dublin Archdiocese’s preoccupations in dealing with cases of child sexual abuse, at least until the mid 1990s, were the maintenance of secrecy, the avoidance of scandal, the protection of the reputation of the Church, and the preservation of its assets. All other considerations, including the welfare of children and justice for victims, were subordinated to these priorities.

The past few years have seen a cascade of revelations from many countries, including, most recently, Germany, and in the past month the cascade has become a flood. Sipe’s prediction has come true. As Cardinal Archbishop of Munich, as Prefect of the Congregation for the Doctrine of the Faith, and now as Pope Benedict XVI, Joseph Ratzinger appears to have been at best neglectful, at worst complicit, in minimizing and covering up specific cases of abuse that came under his supervision.
The response of the ecclesiastical powers that be, once outright denial became untenable, has all along been an unsatisfactory mixture of contrition and irritation. From Benedict on down, Church fathers have made statements of apology and shame. Awareness programs have been launched, studies have been conducted, bishops have been obliged to resign. The Pope met personally with victims of abuse during his visit to the United States, in 2008, and even his critics agree that he has taken the problem more seriously, both before and since his elevation to the throne of St. Peter, than did his predecessor, the soon-to-be-sainted John Paul II.
On the other hand, that’s not setting the bar very high. When serious discipline has been imposed, it has generally been in the wake of bad publicity, usually from outside the Church and always from outside the hierarchy. There has been a lot of bad publicity of late, and some of the reaction has been tinged with resentful paranoia. In an editorial, LOsservatore Romano, the official Vatican newspaper, accused “the media” of having the “rather obvious and ignoble intention of attacking Benedict XVI and his closest collaborators at all costs.” This was echoed, nearer home, by the Archbishop of New York, Timothy Dolan, who, in his blog (yes, he has one), accused the Times of “being part of a well-oiled campaign against Pope Benedict.” Back in Rome, on Palm Sunday, the Pope himself spoke darkly of “the petty gossip of dominant opinion.”
y The Catholic Church is an authoritarian institution, modelled on the political structures of the Roman Empire and medieval Europe. It is better at transmitting instructions downward than at facilitating accountabilitupward. It is monolithic. It claims the unique legitimacy of a line of succession going back to the apostolic circle of Jesus Christ. Its leaders are protected by a nimbus of mystery, pomp, holiness, and, in the case of the Pope, infallibility—to be sure, only in certain doctrinal matters, not administrative ones, but the aura is not so selective. The hierarchy of such an institution naturally resists admitting to moral turpitude and sees squalid scandal as a mortal threat. Equally important, the government of the Church is entirely male.
It is not “anti-Catholic” to hypothesize that these things may have something to do with the Church’s extraordinary difficulty in coming to terms with clerical sexual abuse. The iniquities now roiling the Catholic Church are more shocking than the ones that so outraged Martin Luther. But the broader society in which the Church is embedded has grown incomparably freer. To the extent that the Church manages to purge itself of its shame—its sins, its crimes—it will owe a debt of gratitude to the lawyers, the journalists, and, above all, the victims and families who have had the courage to persevere, against formidable resistance, in holding it to account. Without their efforts, the suffering of tens of thousands of children would still be a secret. Our largely democratic, secularist, liberal, pluralist modern world, against which the Church has so often set its face, turns out to be its best teacher—and the savior, you might say, of its most vulnerable, most trusting communicants.



http://www.newyorker.com/talk/commen...talk_hertzberg



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  #4  
Old 04-24-2010, 06:42 PM
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Re: First Europe, then the US – now abuse claims s

why is this in the POLITICAL area!? is everything political these days!?
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Old 04-24-2010, 08:27 PM
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Re: First Europe, then the US – now abuse claims s

um. none of these boys had parents? the child reports to the parent, the parent reports to he church, and the church says, don't worry about it? what? blame the pope?

parents. parents fail to protect their children. lawyers realized there's no money in suing parents for neglect, but there's lots of money to be made by suing the church.

it is up to the parents to prosecute. if the local police won't do it you go up the political chain of command to get to somebody with real power, and if he won't jail the molester, you go to the media.


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Old 04-25-2010, 05:32 AM
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Re: First Europe, then the US – now abuse claims s

Quote:
Originally Posted by mumbles View Post
um. none of these boys had parents? the child reports to the parent, the parent reports to he church, and the church says, don't worry about it? what? blame the pope?

parents. parents fail to protect their children. lawyers realized there's no money in suing parents for neglect, but there's lots of money to be made by suing the church.

it is up to the parents to prosecute. if the local police won't do it you go up the political chain of command to get to somebody with real power, and if he won't jail the molester, you go to the media.

So even if the alligations are made and admitted aby those accused and also admited to by their employers the church they can continue to do the same things.

So let's see if I got this right. A man or woman by job title is called a priest or a nun, commits the crime of Sodomy or Rape or child abuse. All of which are illegal in most countries of the world and have a sentence in prison if convited in a court of law and doing so with the full knowledge of their employers and supervisors that will transfer them so they don't get caught but can continue to do so.

Now we have not only the person that has commited the crime and the employers and suprvisors that are now accessories before, during and after the fact all go free simply because they are afiliated with a church, and are above the law.

Have I missed anything?
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Old 04-25-2010, 05:34 AM
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Re: First Europe, then the US – now abuse claims s

Hi Guys,

Thanks for sharing us with you views.
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Old 04-25-2010, 05:40 AM
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Re: First Europe, then the US – now abuse claims s

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Hi Guys,

Thanks for sharing us with you views.

Well, you will plenty of that here no doubt.
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Old 04-25-2010, 09:32 AM
Tulip Tulip is offline
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Re: First Europe, then the US – now abuse claims s

Quote:
Originally Posted by mumbles View Post
um. none of these boys had parents? the child reports to the parent, the parent reports to he church, and the church says, don't worry about it? what? blame the pope?

parents. parents fail to protect their children. lawyers realized there's no money in suing parents for neglect, but there's lots of money to be made by suing the church.

it is up to the parents to prosecute. if the local police won't do it you go up the political chain of command to get to somebody with real power, and if he won't jail the molester, you go to the media.
Mumbles many of the sexual abuse cases have been reported after the child grew up. The child became an adult and then got the courage to report the sexual abuse. Many parents were not aware of the crime because of the trust and faith the families had in their church and the priest. The church and the priests took advantage of the families and children because of the trust and power they held over them.

This sexual abuse by the Roman Catholic Church needs to be in the courts and the media. This is why the church was hiding the sexual abuse. Fear of being exposed and fear of financial ruin.

It has now been proven the Pope knew of the sexual abuse taking place in the church. The Pope is the leader (supreme head of the Catholic Church) and has power over all in the Roman Catholic Church, so of course he bears responsibility for everything that happens in his church.


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Old 04-25-2010, 10:19 AM
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Re: First Europe, then the US – now abuse claims s

the claim is: the priests were transferred because the abuse was reported by the child. so, who reported what to who? all of these parents never said to their child: "if any adult touches you tell me immediately"? parents didn't know if their child was going to alone with some adult? why not? the pope is in charge of church policy now, but wasn't then.


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Old 04-25-2010, 10:44 AM
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Re: First Europe, then the US – now abuse claims s

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the claim is: the priests were transferred because the abuse was reported by the child. so, who reported what to who? all of these parents never said to their child: "if any adult touches you tell me immediately"? parents didn't know if their child was going to alone with some adult? why not? the pope is in charge of church policy now, but wasn't then.

I truly believe that members of the Roman Catholic Church have had and do have so much trust and faith in the church and it's leaders that in itself played a large part in the church being able to hide the abuse and for the abuse to take place.

Because of the power and control the church has over it's members I think the crime and responsibility for the sexual abuse crimes falls upon the church and its leaders not the parents of the abused.

Yes parents have the responsibility to teach their children about sexual abuse. In this case where Roman Catholic priests were the ones doing the sexual abuse and the church doing the cover up then they have got to be held accountable. The priest who has committed the assault or assaults have committed a felony charge of sexual abuse against children. While the parents of these abused children may have been negligent in giving to much trust to the church I see the church as being totally responsible for the crimes.

The parents were used and abused by the church just like the children. Many and probably most of these families looked at the Roman Catholic Church as their life. All their trust and faith was with the church. They trusted the churches judgment over their own.

The Roman Catholic Church has used and abused its loyal members. They have to be held accountable.


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Old 04-25-2010, 10:04 PM
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Re: First Europe, then the US – now abuse claims s

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the claim is: the priests were transferred because the abuse was reported by the child. so, who reported what to who? all of these parents never said to their child: "if any adult touches you tell me immediately"? parents didn't know if their child was going to alone with some adult? why not? the pope is in charge of church policy now, but wasn't then.
Parents report to the Church; church then tells parents that priest has been removed and punished for his crime, although he was merely transferred to another location elsewhere to inflict more carnage on innocent children.

It makes me wonder if the Catholic clergy themselves believe in Purgatory. Surely, if they did, it would act as a deterrent to indulge in pedophilia or knowingly cover up the egregious crimes of their fellow clergymen?

If it does exist, I'm sure hell has been burning just that much hotter when another pedophile priest bites the dust.

Good riddance....
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Old 04-26-2010, 01:44 AM
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Re: First Europe, then the US – now abuse claims s

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It makes me wonder if the Catholic clergy themselves believe in Purgatory. .
Probably not.

Didn't the Pope effectively scrap the concept, a year or so ago?

No great surprise.

How many Christians really believe, deep down in their hearts and minds, most of what they espout? I would guess not many, not really. They may say they do, but words are cheap.

How many follow in the instructions that Jesus specifically gave, to gain entry into heaven?

Let's have a little look at this..


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